The Full Wiki

More info on J. Sidlow Baxter

J. Sidlow Baxter: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

J. Sidlow Baxter (born in Australia, 1903; died 1999) was a pastor and theologian who authored as many as thirty books[1] (depending on how anthologies and collections of sermons are to be counted) analysing the Bible and advocating a Christian theological perspective. His most popular work was Explore the Book,[1] a 1760 page tome that analyses and summarizes each book of the Bible.

Baxter was raised in Lancashire, England, and attended Spurgeon's College in London before pastoring in England and Scotland, in Northampton and Sunderland. Memories of his early campaigns in Essex in about 1926[2] survive in the Memories of C. Everett.[3]

References

  1. ^ Baxter, J. Sidlow (1987). Explore the Book. Grand Rapids: Zondervan Publishing Hourse. p. 1760. ISBN 0-310-20620-0. 
  2. ^ Roberts, Andrew (20 July 2001). "Archives Edwin Roberts: Mr Everett's memories". http://www.mdx.ac.uk/www/study/arcechu.htm#SidlowBaxter. 
  3. ^ Roberts, Andrew (20 July 2001). "Archives Edwin Roberts: Memories of Gospel Hall Chapel Street Billericay Essex". http://www.mdx.ac.uk/www/study/arcechu.htm#EverettMemories. 

External links

Writing examples


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

J. Sidlow Baxter (born in Australia, 1903; died 1999) was a pastor and theologian] who authored as many as thirty books[1] (depending on how anthologies and collections of sermons are to be counted) analysing the Bible and advocating a fundamentalist Christian theological perspective.

Sourced

  • Regeneration is the fountain; sanctification is the river (in deeper or shallower degree). 'Entire sanctification' is the river in fullest flow.
    • Divine Healing of the Body (1979), p. 287.
  • Fundamentally, our Lord's message was Himself. He did not come merely to preach a Gospel; He himself is that Gospel. He did not come merely to give bread; He said, "I am the bread". He did not come merely to shed light; He said, "I am the light". He did not come merely to show the door; He said, "I am the door". He did not come merely to name a shepherd; He said, "I am the shepherd". He did not come merely to point the way; He said, "I am the way, the truth, and the life".
    • Baxter's Explore the Book (1987) p. 308.
  • Men may spurn our appeals, reject our message, oppose our arguments, despise our persons, but they are helpless against our prayers.
    • Reported in Charlie Jones, Bob Kelly, The Tremendous Power of Prayer (2000) p. 46.
  • I care not what black spiritual crisis we may come through or what delightful spiritual Canaan we may enter, no blessing of the Christian life becomes continually possessed unless we are men and women of regular, daily, unhurried, secret lingerings in prayer.
    • Reported in Wright L. Lassiter, The Power of Prayer (2005), p. xiv.

External links

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about:
Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message