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MLX01 maglev train at Yamanashi test track
MLX01 maglev train Superconducting magnet Bogie

JR-Maglev is a magnetic levitation train system developed by the Central Japan Railway Company and Railway Technical Research Institute (association of Japan Railways Group). JR-Maglev MLX01 (X means experimental) is one of the latest designs of a series of Maglev trains in development in Japan since the 1970s. It is composed of a maximum five cars to run on the Yamanashi Maglev Test Line. On December 2, 2003, a three-car train reached a maximum speed of 581 km/h (361 mph) (world speed record for railed vehicles) in a manned vehicle run.[1]

Contents

Fundamental technology elements



Levitation System
Levitation System
Guide System
Guide System


Drive System
Drive System

See also: technology in the magnetic levitation train article.

Magnetic levitation trains make use of a levitation system, a guide system, and a driving system.

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Levitation

The JR-Maglev levitation train uses an Electro-dynamic Suspension (EDS) system. Moving magnetic fields create a reactive force in a conductor because of the magnetic field induction effect. This force holds up the train. The maglev-trains have superconducting magnetic coils, and the guide ways contain levitation coils.

When the trains run at high speed, levitation coils on the guide way produce reactive forces in response to the approach of the superconducting magnetic coils onboard the trains.

EDS has the advantage of larger gaps than EMS, but EDS needs support wheels which are employed in low speed running, because EDS can't produce a large levitation force at low(er) speeds (150 km/h or less in JR-Maglev). However, once the train reaches a certain speed, the wheels will actually retract so that the train is floating.

Guide

Levitation coils which are located on the guide way generate guiding and stabilizing forces also.

Driving

JR-Maglev is driven by a Linear Synchronous Motor (LSM) System. This system is needed to supply power to the coils at the guide way.

Yamanashi Test Track

Yamanashi Experiment Lines are facilities that currently have a practical use. It includes about 18.4 km of track (including 16.0 km of tunnels).

History

ML500 1979 world speed record holder of 517 km/h on display in National Transportation Museum in Osaka, Japan.
MXL01-1 at Expo 2005
  • 1962 – Initial technology research was started.
  • 1977 – The experiment run was started at Miyazaki tracks.
  • 1995 - Experiments cease on Miyazaki tracks.
  • 1997 – The experiment run was started at Yamanashi tracks (MLX01) on April.
  • 2004 – Number of passengers for Maglev trial ride exceeded 80,000 people. Test of two trains passing each other at a maximum relative speed of 1,026 km/h.
  • 2005 - Crown Prince Naruhito experienced Maglev trial ride.

Vehicles

  • 1972 – LSM200
  • 1972 – ML100
  • 1975 – ML100A
  • 1977 – ML-500
  • 1979 – ML-500R
  • 1980 – MLU001
  • 1987 – MLU002
  • 1993 – MLU002N
  • 1996 – MLX01
  • 2002 – MLX01-901
  • 2009 - MLX09

Manned record

km/h Train Type Location Date Comments
60 ML100 Maglev RTRI of JNR, Japan 1972
400.8 MLU001 Maglev Miyazaki Maglev Test Track, Japan February 1987 Two-car train set. Former world speed record for maglev trains.
394.3 MLU002 Maglev Miyazaki Maglev Test Track, Japan November 1989 Single-car.
411 MLU002N Maglev Miyazaki Maglev Test Track, Japan February 1995 Single-car.
531 MLX01 Maglev Yamanashi Maglev Test Line, Japan 12 December 1997 Three-car train set. Former world speed record for maglev trains.
552 MLX01 Maglev Yamanashi Maglev Test Line, Japan 14 April 1999 Five-car train set. Former world speed record for maglev trains.
581 MLX01 Maglev Yamanashi Maglev Test Line, Japan 2 December 2003 World speed record for maglev trains.

Unmanned record

km/h Train Type Location Date Comments
504 ML-500 Maglev Miyazaki Maglev Test Track, Japan 12 December 1979
517 ML-500 Maglev Miyazaki Maglev Test Track, Japan 21 December 1979
352.4 MLU001 Maglev Miyazaki Maglev Test Track, Japan January 1986 Three-car train set.
405.3 MLU001 Maglev Miyazaki Maglev Test Track, Japan January 1987 Two-car train set.
431 MLU002N Maglev Miyazaki Maglev Test Track, Japan February 1994 Single-car.
550 MLX01 Maglev Yamanashi Maglev Test Line, Japan 24 December 1997 Three-car train set.
548 MLX01 Maglev Yamanashi Maglev Test Line, Japan 18 March 1999 Five-car train set.

Relative passing speed between two trains

km/h (mph) Train Type Location Date Comments
966 (600.25) MLX01 Maglev Yamanashi Maglev Test Line, Japan December 1998 Former world relative passing speed record
1003 (623.24) MLX01 Maglev Yamanashi Maglev Test Line, Japan November 1999 Former world relative passing speed record
1026 (637.52) MLX01 Maglev Yamanashi Maglev Test Line, Japan 16 November 2004 World relative passing speed record

See also

References

  1. ^ Railway Technology Avalanche No. 7, "Our Manned Maglev System Attains Maximum Speed Record of 581 km/h" (1 January 2005). Retrieved on 16 November 2008.

External links

Coordinates: 35°35′N 138°56′E / 35.583°N 138.933°E / 35.583; 138.933


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