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Jack Kerouac

Jack Kerouac by Tom Palumbo circa 1956
Born Jean Louis Kerouac[1]
March 12, 1922(1922-03-12)
Lowell, Massachusetts, U.S.
Died October 21, 1969 (aged 47)
St. Petersburg, Florida, U.S.
Occupation Novelist, Poet, Painter
Nationality American
Genres Beat Poets
Literary movement Beat
Notable work(s) On the Road
.Jack Kerouac (pronounced /ˈkɛruːæk, ˈkɛrəwæk/; March 12, 1922 – October 21, 1969) was an American novelist and poet.^ Jack Kerouac, American beat novelist, born on March 12, 1922 .
  • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

^ Jack Kerouac (March 12, 1922- October 21, 1969) was an American novelist, writer, poet, artist, and part of the Beat Generation.
  • Books by Jack Kerouac - Bibliography and List of Works 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.biblio.com [Source type: General]

^ Jack Kerouac, American beat novelist, born on March 12, 1922, Subterraneans I'd rather be thin than famous.
  • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

.Alongside William S. Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg, he is considered a pioneer of the Beat Generation, and a literary iconoclast.^ His friendship with Allen Ginsberg, William Burroughs and Gregory Corso, among others, defined a generation.
  • Books by Jack Kerouac - Bibliography and List of Works 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.biblio.com [Source type: General]

^ It was during this time that he met the people with whom he was later to journey around the world, the subjects of many of his novels: the so-called Beat Generation, including Allen Ginsberg, Neal Cassady, John Clellon Holmes, Herbert Huncke and William S. Burroughs.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ Publication of the book—and Allen Ginsberg’s 1955 debut of his poem “Howl” at a Fillmore Street performance gallery—form the beginnings of what Kerouac himself labeled the beat generation.
  • Jack Boulware » Archive » The Kerouac Obsession 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.jackboulware.com [Source type: General]

[2]
.Kerouac is held as an important writer both for his spontaneous style and for his content which consistently dealt with such topics as jazz, promiscuity, Buddhism, drugs, poverty, and travel.^ Kerouac began to cut class regularly; he studied the style of writer Thomas Wolfe (1900 – 1938) and hung out on the New York City streets.
  • Jack Kerouac Facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Jack Kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.encyclopedia.com [Source type: General]

^ Kerouac's spontaneous, confessional language style inspired other writers, including Tom Robbins, Richard Brautigan, Hunter S. Thompson, Ken Kesey, and Bob Dylan.
  • Books by Jack Kerouac - Bibliography and List of Works 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.biblio.com [Source type: General]

^ Whilst Kerouac had been striving to match Wolfe, Proust and Melville, Cassady had found a new, headlong autobiographical style that echoed the jazz music they both loved so dearly.
  • Subterranean Homesick Jack - a knol by Peter Daltrey 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

.His writings have inspired several prominent writers, including Hunter S. Thompson, Tom Robbins, Thomas Pynchon, Lester Bangs, Will Clarke, Richard Brautigan, Ken Kesey, Haruki Murakami, Tom Waits, Bob Dylan, and writers of the New Journalism.^ Kerouac began to cut class regularly; he studied the style of writer Thomas Wolfe (1900 – 1938) and hung out on the New York City streets.
  • Jack Kerouac Facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Jack Kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.encyclopedia.com [Source type: General]

^ Now there were new heroes claiming inspiration from Kerouac-like Bob Dylan, Lenny Bruce, and Ken Kesey, a muscular novelist from the northwest.
  • Culture Wars Magazine - The Apocalypse of Jack Kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.culturewars.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Inspired by grief over his father's death and gripped by determination to write the Great American Novel, he draws largely on his own New England childhood.

His works were sometimes shunned as "slapdash", "grossly sentimental",[3] and "immoral"[4]. .Kerouac did manage to acquire underground celebrity status and was, for a time, labeled as a progenitor of the Hippie movement.^ Kerouac is considered by some as the King of the Beats as well as the Father of the Hippies , although it must be said that he actively disliked such labels, and, in particular, regarded the Hippie movement with some disdain.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ Writer-Director of Earthly movies Sponsored & Angeled in Heaven Some believed that at times Kerouac's writing technique did not produce lively or energetic prose.
  • Books by Jack Kerouac - Bibliography and List of Works 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.biblio.com [Source type: General]

^ Some believed that at times Kerouac's writing technique did not produce lively or energetic prose.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

[5] Disenchanted with mainstream America and never having gotten over the death of his older brother when he was four years old, Kerouac lost his battle to alcoholism and died at the age of 47 in 1969.
Since his death, and thanks in large part to the efforts of editor Ann Charters, Kerouac's literary prestige has steadily grown over the years, with several previously unpublished works surfacing, and all of his books being in print today, among them: On the Road, The Dharma Bums, Mexico City Blues, The Subterraneans, Desolation Angels, Visions of Cody and Big Sur.

Contents

Biography

Family and childhood

.Jack Kerouac was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, to French-Canadian parents, Léo-Alcide Kéroack and Gabrielle-Ange L'Evesque, natives of the province of Quebec, Canada.^ His parents, Leo-Alcide Kerouac and Gabrielle-Ange Levesque, were natives of the province of Quebec in Canada.
  • Books by Jack Kerouac - Bibliography and List of Works 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.biblio.com [Source type: General]

^ Jack Kerouac comes home to Lowell.
  • Jack Kerouac Facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Jack Kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.encyclopedia.com [Source type: General]

^ He was born in 1922 in Lowell, Massachusetts, a factory town his French-Canadian ancestors migrated to from Quebec.
  • Culture Wars Magazine - The Apocalypse of Jack Kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.culturewars.com [Source type: Original source]

.There is some confusion surrounding his original name partly due to variations on the spelling of Kerouac, and partly because of Kerouac's own promotion of his name as Jean-Louis Lebris de Kerouac.^ Jean-Louis Lebris De Kerouac was born on the 12th March 1922 in Lowell, Massachusetts.
  • Subterranean Homesick Jack - a knol by Peter Daltrey 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

^ Born March 12, 1922, in Lowell, Massachusetts, Jean-Louis Lebris de Kerouac was the son of Leo Kerouac, a printer, and Gabrielle Levesque, a factory worker.
  • Jack Kerouac Facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Jack Kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.encyclopedia.com [Source type: General]

^ Douglas Brinkley, an author and history professor at the University of New Orleans, said the original manuscript was especially important because it contains the real names of Kerouac's road companions, not the pseudonyms that were used in the final version of the book.
  • Buffy and Roswell, Jack Kerouac, Brain Shrinkage, Global Warming! 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC richlabonte.net [Source type: News]

.His reason for doing so seems to be linked to an old family legend that the Kerouacs had descended from Baron Francois Louis Alexandre Lebris de Kerouac.^ Born March 12, 1922, in Lowell, Massachusetts, Jean-Louis Lebris de Kerouac was the son of Leo Kerouac, a printer, and Gabrielle Levesque, a factory worker.
  • Jack Kerouac Facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Jack Kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.encyclopedia.com [Source type: General]

^ Jean-Louis Lebris De Kerouac was born on the 12th March 1922 in Lowell, Massachusetts.
  • Subterranean Homesick Jack - a knol by Peter Daltrey 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

^ Jack Kerouac was born Jean-Louis Lebris de Kerouac, in Lowell, Massachusetts to French-Canadian parents, Leo-Alcide Kerouac and Gabrielle-Ange Lévesque, natives of the province of Québec, Canada.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

.Kerouac's baptism certificate lists his name simply as Jean Louis Kirouac.^ Jean-Louis Lebris De Kerouac was born on the 12th March 1922 in Lowell, Massachusetts.
  • Subterranean Homesick Jack - a knol by Peter Daltrey 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

^ Born March 12, 1922, in Lowell, Massachusetts, Jean-Louis Lebris de Kerouac was the son of Leo Kerouac, a printer, and Gabrielle Levesque, a factory worker.
  • Jack Kerouac Facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Jack Kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.encyclopedia.com [Source type: General]

^ Kerouac was born Jean-Louis Louis Kerouac, in Lowell, Massachusetts, to a family of Franco-Americans.
  • Books by Jack Kerouac - Bibliography and List of Works 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.biblio.com [Source type: General]

[6]
.Kerouac often gave conflicting stories about his family history and the origins of his surname.^ Much is known about Kerouac, his life, his family and friends.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Ferlinghetti very kindly gave me the permission to include it amongst the few letters to Kerouac or about Kerouac that I included as the other side of the story to Jack's letters.
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

^ This book includes sketches and stories from Kerouac's teenage and early college years and a fragment of a novel he wrote about his tenure in the Merchant Marines.
  • Books by Jack Kerouac - Bibliography and List of Works 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.biblio.com [Source type: General]

.He sometimes claimed he was descended from a Breton nobleman, granted land after the Battle of Quebec, whose sons all married Native Americans.^ For all his Route-66, All-American-Boy allure and his toying with Buddhism, Kerouac sprang from one of North America's rare, native, Roman Catholic communities.
  • Swans Commentary: Jack Kerouac In The Heel Of Italy, by Peter Byrne - pbyrne18 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.swans.com [Source type: Original source]

[7] .Research has shown him to actually be the descendant of a middle-class merchant colonist whose sons married French Canadians, Kerouac's own father having been born to a family of potato farmers in the village of Saint-Hubert-de-Rivière-du-Loup.^ Jack Kerouac was born Jean-Louis Lebris de Kerouac, in Lowell, Massachusetts to French-Canadian parents, Leo-Alcide Kerouac and Gabrielle-Ange Lévesque, natives of the province of Québec, Canada.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ Kerouac was born Jean-Louis Lebris de Kerouac , in Lowell, Massachusetts , to a family of Franco-Americans.

^ He was the third child of Leo and Gabrielle Kerouac, both French-Canadian immigrants who had met and married in Nashua, New Hampshire.
  • Jack Kerouac's Visions of Gerard 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC beatdom.com [Source type: General]

.He also had various stories on the etymology of his surname, usually tracing it back to Irish, Breton, or other Celtic roots.^ Atop an Underwood Early Stories and Other Writings by ( 1999) The work that made Jack Kerouac famous shows its roots in this collection of his juvenilia.
  • Books by Jack Kerouac - Bibliography and List of Works 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.biblio.com [Source type: General]

.In one interview he claimed it was the name of a dead Celtic language and in another said it was from the Irish for "language of the water" and related to Kerwick.^ Plus the great one in the Paris Reviel interview where he says, "All of it is in my mind, naturally, except tha language that is used at the time it is used."
  • http://www.writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88v/kerouac-per-coolidge.html 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.writing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ "Elizabeth Rickets Hall described O'Farrell as a 'miscreant' and at one stage was said to be involved with the Fenians (fighter for Irish independence), on the assumption of his Irish heritage.
  • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

^ The name probably means 'meeting place' in one of Australia's approximately 700 distinct Aboriginal languages .
  • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

[8] Kerouac, derived from Kervoach, is the name of one hamlet situated in Brittany in Lanmeur, near Morlaix.[9] Deleuze and Guattari cited Kerouac as a literary example of an oscillation from revolutionary left-wing expressions to fascist expressions; they said he "took a revolutionary 'flight'" with his on the road journeys, but later finds himself in the "old fascist dream" of searching for "his Breton ancestors of the superior race".[10]
.Despite the future elaborations, around the house during his childhood, Kerouac was referred to as Ti Jean or little Jean.^ Gerard would lead "Ti Jean" (Little John, Jack's nickname) around the outdoor Stations of the Cross on Sundays, until rheumatic fever rendered the oldest Kerouac child a bedridden invalid.
  • Culture Wars Magazine - The Apocalypse of Jack Kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.culturewars.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Kerouac broke a leg playing football during his freshman season, and argued constantly with coach Lou Little who kept him benched.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ "Ti Jean", it said on it: his childhood nickname in Canuck patois, Little Jack.
  • Misremembering Jack Kerouac | Books | guardian.co.uk 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.guardian.co.uk [Source type: General]

[6] .Kerouac did not start to learn English until the age of six, and at home, he and his family spoke French.^ At home, he and his family spoke Quebec French.
  • Books by Jack Kerouac - Bibliography and List of Works 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.biblio.com [Source type: General]

^ At home, he and his family spoke Quebec French .

^ Jack didn't start to learn English until the age of six.
  • Jack Kerouac Page - DHARMA beat 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wordsareimportant.com [Source type: General]
  • Books by Jack Kerouac - Bibliography and List of Works 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.biblio.com [Source type: General]

[11][12] .When he was four, he was profoundly affected by the death of his nine-year-old brother, Gérard, from rheumatic fever, an event later described in his novel Visions of Gerard.^ When he was four years old his brother, Gerard, died aged just nine.
  • Subterranean Homesick Jack - a knol by Peter Daltrey 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

^ At an early age, he was profoundly affected by the death (from rhuematic fever, age nine) of his elder brother Gérard, an event later described in his novel Visions of Gerard .
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ Gerards death has come to be seen by researchers as a potential source of Kerouacs torments and turmoil, and Visions of Gerard has been described as being told from the standpoint of a man looking from the dark torrents of a raging river at an unattainable peaceful shore.
  • Jack Kerouac's Visions of Gerard 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC beatdom.com [Source type: General]

.Some of Kerouac's poetry was written in French, and in letters written to friend Allen Ginsberg towards the end of his life, he expressed his desire to speak his parents' native tongue again.^ Some of Kerouac's poetry was written in French, and in letters written to friend Allen Ginsberg towards the end of his life, he expressed his desire to speak his parents' native tongue again.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ His parents, Leo-Alcide Kerouac and Gabrielle-Ange Levesque, were natives of the province of Quebec in Canada.
  • Books by Jack Kerouac - Bibliography and List of Works 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.biblio.com [Source type: General]

^ His parents, Leo-Alcide Kerouac and Gabrielle-Ange Lvesque, were natives of the province of Quebec in Canada .

.Recently, it was discovered that Kerouac first started writing On the Road in French, a language in which he also wrote two unpublished novels.^ Kerouac's 'lost' first novel surfaces .
  • Misremembering Jack Kerouac | Books | guardian.co.uk 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.guardian.co.uk [Source type: General]

^ He started writing his first novel, called The Town and the City .
  • Jack Kerouac Page - DHARMA beat 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wordsareimportant.com [Source type: General]
  • Books by Jack Kerouac - Bibliography and List of Works 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.biblio.com [Source type: General]

^ In 1951, Kerouac wrote his most famous novel, On the Road, based on his adventures with Neal Cassady.
  • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

[13] The writings are in dialectal Quebec French.
.There were few African-Americans in Lowell,[14] so the young Kerouac was not raised in an environment of racial hatred as many were at the time, though he was exposed to great degree of anti-Semitism, a movement that was on the rise in 1930s America.^ There is much sympathetic interest in Jack Kerouac's writing, and efforts are underway to favorably re-evaluate his place in American literature.
  • Culture Wars Magazine - The Apocalypse of Jack Kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.culturewars.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Lowell viewed him as a drunk—some there still do (few greeted the idea for a Kerouac commemorative park on Bridge Street with enthusiasm)—the media saw him as an evil Pied Piper leading the young astray, even the beats sneered at his devotion to his mother.
  • Daytripping in Jack Kerouac's Lowell 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC serendipityjones.com [Source type: General]

^ Kerouac is buried in his home town of Lowell and was honored posthumously with a Doctor of Letters degree from his hometown's University of Massachusetts - Lowell on June 2, 2007.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

[15] .Kerouac once recalled to Ted Berrigan, in an interview with the Paris Review, an incident from the 1940s, in which his mother and father were walking together in a Jewish neighborhood in the Lower East Side of New York, saying "And here comes a whole bunch of rabbis walking arm in arm...^ "Once when Kerouac was high on psychedelics with Timothy Leary , he looked out the window and said, 'Walking on water wasn't built in a day.'

^ Who?” he says, and then, dimly recalling as if from a long-ago “heads-up e-mail,” he says, “I think there’s a case with that guy’s stuff here somewhere.” I thrust some money into the lad’s hands and speed-walk through the exhibits until I get to the Kerouac case.
  • Daytripping in Jack Kerouac's Lowell 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC serendipityjones.com [Source type: General]

^ Despite panning it almost universally, critics nevertheless found themselves acknowledging Kerouac's "peculiar genius," as David Dempsey put it in his New York Times review of May 3, 1959.
  • Books by Jack Kerouac - Bibliography and List of Works 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.biblio.com [Source type: General]

teedah- teedah - teedah... and they wouldn't part for this Christian man and his wife. .So my father went POOM! and knocked a rabbi right in the gutter....^ (Leo's wrath was not reserved to priests; once a rabbi got in his way, and Leo knocked the man into a gutter).
  • Culture Wars Magazine - The Apocalypse of Jack Kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.culturewars.com [Source type: Original source]

.Now if you don't like that, Berrigan, that's the history of my family."^ Jack Kerouac Mankind is like dogs, not gods as long as you don't get mad they'll bite you but stay mad and you'll never be bitten.
  • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

^ Iowa I know by now the children must be crying in the land where they let the children cry, and tonight the stars'll be out, and don't you know that God is Pooh Bear?"

^ I'm spending my life listening to it and thinking about it and playing it, but I don't know how many of you know much about its history.
  • http://www.writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88v/kerouac-per-coolidge.html 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.writing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

[16][17]
.Kerouac's athletic prowess led him to become a 100-meter hurdler on his local high school track team, and his skills as a running back in American football earned him scholarship offers from Boston College, Notre Dame and Columbia University.^ Football got me a scholarship to Columbia and I was not sorry to leave."
  • Cindy Rosenthal 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC thegates.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Kerouac was a star football player for his high school team.

^ Later, his athletic prowess led him to become a star on his local football team, and this achievement earned him scholarships to Boston College and Columbia University in New York .

.He entered Columbia University after spending a year at Horace Mann School, where he earned the requisite grades to matriculate to Columbia.^ He entered Columbia University after spending the scholarship's required year at Horace Mann School.
  • Books by Jack Kerouac - Bibliography and List of Works 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.biblio.com [Source type: General]
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ He entered Columbia University after spending the scholarship's required year at Horace Mann School .

^ Kerouac's athletic prowess led him to become a star on his local high school football team and earned him scholarship offers from Boston College, Notre Dame and Columbia University.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

.Kerouac cracked a tibia playing football during his freshman season, and he argued constantly with coach Lou Little who kept him benched.^ Kerouac broke a leg playing football during his freshman season, and argued constantly with coach Lou Little who kept him benched.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ There's a wonderful interview with the poet Philip Whalen, who knew Kerouac very well and watched him writing at one point and described it.
  • http://www.writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88v/kerouac-per-coolidge.html 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.writing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Kerouac is talking about Lee Konitz, who he said "inspired me in 1951 to write the way he plays."
  • http://www.writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88v/kerouac-per-coolidge.html 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.writing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

While at Columbia, Kerouac wrote several sports articles for the student newspaper, the Columbia Daily Spectator.[citation needed] He also studied at The New School.

Early adulthood

.When his football career at Columbia soured, especially because of conflict with Lou Little, Kerouac dropped out of the university.^ Douglas Brinkley, an author and history professor at the University of New Orleans, said the original manuscript was especially important because it contains the real names of Kerouac's road companions, not the pseudonyms that were used in the final version of the book.
  • Buffy and Roswell, Jack Kerouac, Brain Shrinkage, Global Warming! 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC richlabonte.net [Source type: News]

^ Possessed of a talent for football, he leaves his hometown on a sporting scholarship to Columbia University, New York.
  • Books by Jack Kerouac | Whitcoulls 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.whitcoulls.co.nz [Source type: General]

^ Orpheus Emerged by Jack Kerouac ( 2001) This highly autobiographical work, set at a very Columbia-like university, was written in 1945, when Kerouac was 23.
  • Books by Jack Kerouac - Bibliography and List of Works 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.biblio.com [Source type: General]

.He continued to live for a period on New York City's Upper West Side with his girlfriend, Edie Parker.^ After leaving Columbia Kerouac spent two unsettled years in the US Marine before returning to New York where he met and fell in love with Edie Parker.
  • Subterranean Homesick Jack - a knol by Peter Daltrey 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

^ Beatfootprints.com - A Photographic Essay of Beat Generation Landmarks in New York City Just when I thought there was nothing new on the web!

^ The affair began listening to Charlie Parker at the Open Door and continued at the girl`s tenement apartment, Paradise Alley, on the Lowere East Side.
  • Subterranean Homesick Jack - a knol by Peter Daltrey 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

.It was during this time that he met the people—now famous—with whom he would always be associated, the subjects injected into many of his novels: the so-called Beat Generation, including Allen Ginsberg, Neal Cassady, John Clellon Holmes, Herbert Huncke and William S. Burroughs.^ It was during this time that he met the people with whom he was later to journey around the world, the subjects of many of his novels: the so-called Beat Generation, including Allen Ginsberg, Neal Cassady, John Clellon Holmes, Herbert Huncke and William S. Burroughs.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ It was in New York that Kerouac met the people with whom he was to journey around the world, and the subjects of many of his novels: the so-called Beat Generation, which included people such as Allen Ginsberg, Neal Cassady and William S. Burroughs.
  • Books by Jack Kerouac - Bibliography and List of Works 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.biblio.com [Source type: General]

^ His friendship with Allen Ginsberg, William Burroughs and Gregory Corso, among others, defined a generation.
  • Books by Jack Kerouac - Bibliography and List of Works 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.biblio.com [Source type: General]

.Kerouac joined the United States Merchant Marine in 1942, and in 1943 joined the United States Navy, but was honorably discharged during World War II on psychiatric grounds (he was of "indifferent character" with a diagnosis of "schizoid personality").^ In 1943 , he joined the United States Navy , but was discharged during World War II on psychiatric grounds---he was of "indifferent disposition."

^ In 1943, he joined the United States Navy, but was discharged during World War II on psychiatric grounds, he was of "indifferent disposition."
  • Books by Jack Kerouac - Bibliography and List of Works 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.biblio.com [Source type: General]

^ He left Columbia for a short stint in the Merchant Marines, then joined the Navy.
  • Culture Wars Magazine - The Apocalypse of Jack Kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.culturewars.com [Source type: Original source]

[18]
In 1944, Kerouac was arrested as a material witness in the murder of David Kammerer, who had been stalking Kerouac's friend Lucien Carr since Carr was a teenager in St. Louis. (William Burroughs was himself a native of St. Louis, and it was through Carr that Kerouac came to know both Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg.) .When Kammerer's obsession with Carr turned aggressive, Carr stabbed him to death and turned to Kerouac for help.^ Carr had come to each of them and confessed; Kerouac helped him get rid of the weapon .

^ From 1991 to 1993, Weinberg says, he had an arrangement with John Sampas, acting as his agent and helping him sell off portions of the Kerouac archive.
  • Jack Boulware » Archive » The Kerouac Obsession 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.jackboulware.com [Source type: General]

^ So, although he accepted On the Road , he turned down every other manuscript that Kerouac showed him of the dozen that he'd written, including Doctor Sax .
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

.Together, they disposed of evidence.^ Together, they disposed of evidence.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

.As advised by Burroughs, they turned themselves in.^ Advised by Burroughs to turn themselves in, Kerouac's bail was set at $100, which his father first refused to pay.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

.Kerouac's father refused to pay his bail.^ Kerouac`s parents refused to stand bail for their son, threatening to disown him.
  • Subterranean Homesick Jack - a knol by Peter Daltrey 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

Kerouac then agreed to marry Edie Parker if she'd pay it. .Their marriage was annulled a year later, and Kerouac and Burroughs briefly collaborated on a novel about the Kammerer killing entitled And the Hippos Were Boiled in Their Tanks.^ Their marriage was annulled a year later, and Kerouac and Burroughs briefly collaborated on a novel about the Kammerer murder entitled And the Hippos Were Boiled in Their Tanks.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ And the Hippos Were Boiled in their Tanks is a novel that Kerouac wrote with Burroughs, apparently in the first months of 1945.
  • Young Bull and Old Jack | Open Letters Monthly - an Arts and Literature Review 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.openlettersmonthly.com [Source type: General]

^ Kerouac also later wrote about the murder in his novel Vanity of Duluoz.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

.Though the book was not published during the lifetimes of either Kerouac or Burroughs, an excerpt eventually appeared in Word Virus: A William S. Burroughs Reader (and as noted below, the novel was finally published late 2008).^ During Kerouac's time at Columbia University, Burroughs and Kerouac got into trouble with the law for failing to report a murder; this incident formed the basis of a mystery novel the two collaborated on in 1945 entitled And the Hippos Were Boiled in Their Tanks (the novel was never published, although an excerpt from the manuscript would be included in the Burroughs compilation Word Virus ).
  • Books by Jack Kerouac - Bibliography and List of Works 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.biblio.com [Source type: General]

^ The essay was excerpted for APR from a book that had not yet appeared-- Disembodied Poetics: Annals of the Jack Kerouac School edited by Anne Waldman and Andrew Schelling, which was published by the University of New Mexico Press.
  • http://www.writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88v/kerouac-per-coolidge.html 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.writing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ An autobiographical novel (like most of Kerouac's books), ON THE ROAD involves characters who were the author's real-life friends and Beat cohorts: Neal Cassady, Gregory Corso, Allan Ginsberg, and William Burroughs (here appearing, as in Burroughs's own fiction, as the character Bill Lee).
  • Books by Jack Kerouac - Bibliography and List of Works 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.biblio.com [Source type: General]

.Kerouac also later wrote about the killing in his novel Vanity of Duluoz.^ Kerouac also later wrote about the murder in his novel Vanity of Duluoz.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ In 1951, Kerouac wrote his most famous novel, On the Road, based on his adventures with Neal Cassady.
  • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

^ It was at about the time that Kerouac wrote The Subterraneans that he was approached by Ginsberg and others to formally explicate exactly how he wrote it, how he did Spontaneous Prose.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

Jack Kerouac lived with his parents for a time above a corner drug store in Ozone Park (now this flower shop), while writing some of his earliest work.
.Later, he lived with his parents in the Ozone Park neighborhood of Queens, after they, too, moved to New York.^ Later, he lived with his parents in the Ozone Park neighborhood of Queens, after they, too, moved to New York.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ Jack Kerouac lived above this flower shop in Ozone Park.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ Jack moved out of mémêre`s Ozone Park apartment and into Joan`s loft.
  • Subterranean Homesick Jack - a knol by Peter Daltrey 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

.He wrote his first novel, The Town and the City, and, according to at least John Clellon Holmes, began the famous On the Road around 1949 while living there.^ He started writing his first novel, called The Town and the City .

^ In 1951, Kerouac wrote his most famous novel, On the Road, based on his adventures with Neal Cassady.
  • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

^ Fame "so discombobulated him that for the rest of his life he never, never got his needle back on true north," remembered Kerouac's writer friend, John Clellon Holmes.
  • Culture Wars Magazine - The Apocalypse of Jack Kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.culturewars.com [Source type: Original source]

[19] .His friends jokingly called him "The Wizard of Ozone Park," alluding to Thomas Edison's nickname, "the Wizard of Menlo Park" and to the film The Wizard of Oz.^ His friends jokingly called him "The Wizard of Ozone Park."
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ But Ferlinghetti is loyal to him, and as a friend he helps Kerouac out of a jam when he invites him to get away from the publicity that surrounds the film, The Subterraneans , a few years later, in 1960.
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

[20]
.
Beginning of the original typed roll where Kerouac wrote On the Road.
^ In 1951, Kerouac wrote his most famous novel, On the Road, based on his adventures with Neal Cassady.
  • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

^ Jack Kerouac wrote about life on the road, and off the road.

^ Gibbard stayed in the original cabin Kerouac wrote about, to compose songs for his band’s 2008 Grammy-nominated album, Narrow Stairs.
  • JAY FARRAR AND BENJAMIN GIBBARD JOIN FORCES FOR NEW ALBUM INSPIRED BY JACK KEROUAC’S BIG SUR – One Fast Move Or I'm Gone: Kerouac's Big Sur 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.onefastmove.com [Source type: General]

.The first sentence is: "I first met met Neal not long after my father died..."^ I first met Dean not long after my wife and I split up.

^ Jan met her father for the first time in 1962, when her mother’s efforts to gain child support finally forced Kerouac to take a paternity blood test.
  • Jack Boulware » Archive » The Kerouac Obsession 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.jackboulware.com [Source type: General]

^ My father had died recently, and Allen told me a story about his father, the late poet Louis Ginsberg, who had been a high school teacher in New Jersey.
  • Beat America by Aram Saroyan : The Poetry Foundation [article] 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryfoundation.org [Source type: General]

Later it would be replaced by the definitive one: "I first met Dean not long after my wife and I split up."

Early career 1950–1957

.Kerouac tended to write constantly, carrying a notebook with him everywhere.^ There's a wonderful interview with the poet Philip Whalen, who knew Kerouac very well and watched him writing at one point and described it.
  • http://www.writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88v/kerouac-per-coolidge.html 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.writing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ JF : That's true, and, when you know that, you see him writing a letter to Allen Ginsberg in which he's carefully using Yiddishisms---Kerouac's trying to sound Jewish!
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

^ JF : Kerouac is furious when Gary Snyder gives him a paper that a young woman who's been studying with Snyder writes about him.
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

.Letters to friends and family members tended to be long and rambling, including great detail about his daily life and thoughts.^ Letters to friends and family members tended to be long and rambling, including great detail about his daily life and thoughts.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ Much is known about Kerouac, his life, his family and friends.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

^ I included letters, as I did Ferlinghetti's letter or Carolyn Cassady's letter late in Jack's life, to show that many of his friends stayed loyal and tried to comfort him, because he was really fading fast.
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

.Prior to becoming a writer, he tried a varied list of careers.^ Prior to becoming a writer, he tried a varied list of careers.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ When I was in my first career position, trying to climb the corporate latter, I had become quite chummy with my boss whose name was Judy.
  • Race Still Matters - Sparking - Open Salon 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC open.salon.com [Source type: Original source]

.He was a sports reporter for The Lowell Sun; a temporary worker in construction and food service; a United States Merchant Marine and he joined the United States Navy twice.^ He left Columbia for a short stint in the Merchant Marines, then joined the Navy.
  • Culture Wars Magazine - The Apocalypse of Jack Kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.culturewars.com [Source type: Original source]

.The Town and the City was published in 1950 under the name "John Kerouac," and, though it earned him a few respectable reviews, the book sold poorly.^ The Town and the City was published in 1950 under the name "John Kerouac," and, though it earned him a few respectable reviews, the book sold poorly.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ Jack Kerouac's first published book was The Town and the City published in 1950 under the name John Kerouac.

^ Books also continue to be published that were written by Kerouac, many unfinished by him.

.Heavily influenced by Kerouac's reading of Thomas Wolfe, it reflects on the generational epic formula and the contrasts of small town life versus the multi-dimensional, and larger, city.^ Heavily influenced by Kerouac's reading of Thomas Wolfe, it reflects on the generational epic formula and the contrasts of small town life versus the multi-dimensional, and larger, city.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ 'It is the sum of myself, as far as the written word can go' Kerouac on THE TOWN AND THE CITY Kerouac's debut novel is a great coming of age story which can be read as the essential prelude to his later classics.

^ Kerouac's method was heavily influenced by the prolific explosion of Jazz, especially the Bebop genre established by Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk, and others.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

.The book was heavily edited by Robert Giroux; some 400 pages were taken out.^ She edited the third book of her father's Commentary on the Almagest of Ptolemy" Source Library of Alexandria and Christian destruction of Paganism More Destruction of Paganism , from Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire , by Edward Gibbon (note some quotes on this subject, above on this page) .
  • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

^ Kerouac was so taken with Goddard’s book that he memorized pages of text and a couple of times in Dharma one can find Goddard’s California address.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

.For the next six years, Kerouac wrote constantly.^ For the next six years, Kerouac wrote constantly but could not find a publisher.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ Kerouac’s early biographer, Ann Charters, writes that “In the six years it took Jack to publish On the Road, he wrote twelve books”: .
  • Jack Foley. Beat Haiku - Terebess Asia Online (TAO) 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.terebess.hu [Source type: Original source]

^ Was very into Kerouac between the ages of 18 and 23, but haven't read anything of his in the last six years.
  • Misremembering Jack Kerouac | Books | guardian.co.uk 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.guardian.co.uk [Source type: General]

.Building upon previous drafts tentatively titled "The Beat Generation" and "Gone on the Road," Kerouac completed what is now known as On the Road in April 1951 while living at 454 West 20th Street in Manhattan with his second wife, Joan Haverty.^ Jack Kerouac and his second wife, Joan Haverty, conceived their only child in 1951, when he was living in New York, writing what would become On the Road.
  • Jack Boulware » Archive » The Kerouac Obsession 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.jackboulware.com [Source type: General]

^ Building upon previous drafts tentatively titled "The Beat Generation" and "Gone on the Road," Kerouac wrote what is now known as On the Road in April, 1951 (ISBN 0-312-20677-1).
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ Kerouac's best known work is On the Road .

[21] .The book was largely autobiographical and describes Kerouac's road-trip adventures across the United States and Mexico with Neal Cassady in the late-40's, as well as his relationships with other Beat writers and friends.^ The book was largely autobiographical, narrated from the point of view of the character Sal Paradise, describing Kerouac's roadtrip adventures across the United States and Mexico with Neal Cassady, the model for the character of Dean Moriarty.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ In 1951, Kerouac wrote his most famous novel, On the Road, based on his adventures with Neal Cassady.
  • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

^ By RICHARD PYLE Associated Press Writer NEW YORK May 23, 2001 (AP) The original manuscript of Jack Kerouac's "On The Road,'' the book that defined the restless Beat Generation that came of age in the mid-1950s, may soon embark on a road trip of its own after fetching a record $2.43 million at auction.
  • Buffy and Roswell, Jack Kerouac, Brain Shrinkage, Global Warming! 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC richlabonte.net [Source type: News]

.He completed the first version of the novel during a three-week extended session of spontaneous confessional prose.^ Part of the Kerouac myth is that, fueled by Benzedrine and coffee, he completed the first version of the novel during a three week extended session of spontaneous confessional prose.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ Using Benzedrine and coffee, Kerouac wrote the entire novel in only three weeks in an extended session of spontaneous prose, his original writing style, heavily influenced by Jazz (especially BeBop), and later Buddhism.

.Before beginning, Kerouac cut sheets of tracing paper [22] into long strips, wide enough for a type-writer, and taped them together into a 120-foot (37 m) long roll he then fed into the machine.^ [AP photo] The On the Road manuscript is a 120-foot roll of pasted and taped paper.
  • Tampabay: The fight over all things Kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.sptimes.com [Source type: News]

^ In 1954, Kerouac discovered Dwight Goddard's A Buddhist Bible at the San Jose Library, which marked the beginning of Kerouac's immersion into Buddhism.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ Irritated at having to constantly insert paper into the typewriter, Jack taped together "twenty foot strips of Japanese drawing paper to form a roll that could be fed continuously through his typewriter."
  • Culture Wars Magazine - The Apocalypse of Jack Kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.culturewars.com [Source type: Original source]

This allowed him to type continuously without the interruption of reloading pages. .The resulting manuscript contained no chapter or paragraph breaks and was much more explicit than what would eventually be printed.^ Besides, from what he remembers from high school English, Jack didn't like Lowell that much, and Duncan would be the first to agree that no one should stay here any longer than they absolutely have to.
  • Cindy Rosenthal 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC thegates.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ It's much more fun to peruse Kerouac at City Lights bookstore in SF than on Amazon.
  • Jack Kerouac Lives! - Page 1 - The Daily Beast 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thedailybeast.com [Source type: General]

^ A generous offer, no doubt, but Pilcher and his men had already found more than 120 joints.
  • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

.Though "spontaneous," Kerouac had prepared long in advance before beginning to write.^ The ‘spontaneous prose’ that became Kerouac’s hallmark was simply one of the unconventional techniques he employed in the writing of Dharma.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

^ I'm really beginning to see how Kerouac, writing this stuff in this style back in the fifties, helped popularize Buddhism.

[23] .In fact, according to his Columbia professor and mentor Mark Van Doren, he had outlined much of the work in his journals over the several preceding years.^ In fact, according to his Columbia professor and mentor Mark Van Doren, he had outlined much of the work in his journals over several years.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ Written at speed like much of his work, the benzedrine Kerouac was on sustained him, but the memories of thirty years earlier were no less painful.
  • Subterranean Homesick Jack - a knol by Peter Daltrey 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

^ Ginsberg had given the mighty manuscript to Mark van Doren to read.
  • Subterranean Homesick Jack - a knol by Peter Daltrey 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

.Though the work was completed quickly, Kerouac had a long and difficult time finding a buyer.^ Kerouac was so taken with Goddard’s book that he memorized pages of text and a couple of times in Dharma one can find Goddard’s California address.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In a long prose sketch, `October in the Railroad Earth,` Kerouac recorded his experiences working as a brakeman in late 1952 on the Southern Pacific railway.
  • Subterranean Homesick Jack - a knol by Peter Daltrey 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

^ After completing her doctorate she worked with Jack Kerouac on a bibliography of his writings.
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

.Publishers rejected the manuscript because of its experimental writing style and its sympathetic tone towards minorities and marginalized social groups of post-War America.^ Publishers rejected the book due to its experimental writing style and its sympathetic tone towards minorities and marginalized social groups of the United States in the 1950s.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ His publisher is angry because he hasn’t been able to finish his Vietnam book, but no war in the world matters to him as much as the war with the Sampases of Lowell, Mass.
  • Jack Boulware » Archive » The Kerouac Obsession 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.jackboulware.com [Source type: General]

^ A number of the guys I worked with were Kerouac fans and that was how I got into reading him, and indeed other literature from post-war America.
  • Misremembering Jack Kerouac | Books | guardian.co.uk 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.guardian.co.uk [Source type: General]

.Many editors were also uncomfortable with the idea of publishing a book that contained what were, for the era, graphic descriptions of drug-use and homosexual behavior, a move that could result in obscenity charges being filed, a fate that later befell Burroughs' Naked Lunch and Ginsberg's Howl.^ But it also led to Ferlinghetti and his publishing partner being arrested and put on trial for obscenity.
  • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

^ AMY GOODMAN: Explain the significance of Howl and why you published Allen Ginsberg’s poem.
  • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

^ Kerouac was soon living with both Ginsberg and Borroughs, witnessing first hand the latter`s addiction to morphine and heroin and how the writer noted his experiences for use in his later books, `Junkie` and `Naked Lunch.` Jack was now hooked on the unrelenting barb of benzedrine.
  • Subterranean Homesick Jack - a knol by Peter Daltrey 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

.In late 1951, Joan Haverty left and divorced Kerouac while pregnant.^ Jack Kerouac and his second wife, Joan Haverty, conceived their only child in 1951, when he was living in New York, writing what would become On the Road.
  • Jack Boulware » Archive » The Kerouac Obsession 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.jackboulware.com [Source type: General]

^ In a first step towards this idyllic goal Kerouac married Joan Haverty, a tall, dark haired girl, a friend of Ginsberg`s.
  • Subterranean Homesick Jack - a knol by Peter Daltrey 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

.In February 1952, she gave birth to Kerouac's only child Jan Kerouac, though he refused to acknowledge her as his own until a blood test confirmed it 9 years later.^ His only child, Jan, passed away two years ago.
  • Jack Boulware » Archive » The Kerouac Obsession 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.jackboulware.com [Source type: General]

^ Sampas’ brother Sammy was Jack’s boyhood friend, and years later their sister, Stella, would become the third Mrs. Kerouac.
  • Jack Boulware » Archive » The Kerouac Obsession 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.jackboulware.com [Source type: General]

^ But Ferlinghetti is loyal to him, and as a friend he helps Kerouac out of a jam when he invites him to get away from the publicity that surrounds the film, The Subterraneans , a few years later, in 1960.
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

[24] .For the next several years Kerouac continued writing and traveling, taking extensive trips throughout the U.S. and Mexico and often fell into bouts of depression and heavy drug and alcohol use.^ A DVD entitled "Kerouac: King of the Beats" features several minutes of his appearance on Firing Line , William F. Buckley 's television show, during Kerouac's later years when alcoholism had taken control.

^ Through his writings Kerouac provided readers with glimpses into almost every aspect of his wildly fun, controversial and conflicting adventures.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

^ But years of alcohol and drugs, compounded by an inherited blood disease, had ravaged her body.
  • Jack Boulware » Archive » The Kerouac Obsession 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.jackboulware.com [Source type: General]

.During this period he finished drafts for what would become 10 more novels, including The Subterraneans, Doctor Sax, Tristessa, and Desolation Angels, which chronicle many of the events of these years.^ Kerouac developed something of a friendship with the scholar Alan Watts (cryptically named Arthur Wayne in Kerouac's novel Big Sur , and Alex Aums in Desolation Angels ).
  • Jack Kerouac Page - DHARMA beat 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wordsareimportant.com [Source type: General]
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ Blake is the Lil Luke in several novels, including Dharma Bums and Desolation Angels.
  • Tampabay: The fight over all things Kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.sptimes.com [Source type: News]

^ Sampas’ brother Sammy was Jack’s boyhood friend, and years later their sister, Stella, would become the third Mrs. Kerouac.
  • Jack Boulware » Archive » The Kerouac Obsession 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.jackboulware.com [Source type: General]

.In 1954, Kerouac discovered Dwight Goddard's A Buddhist Bible at the San Jose Library, which marked the beginning of his immersion into Buddhism.^ In 1954 , Kerouac discovered Dwight Goddard's A Buddhist Bible at the San Jose Library, which then marked the beginning of his studies of Buddhism and his own personal quest for enlightenment .

^ Goddard’s A Buddhist Bible provided Kerouac with the basics for his Buddhist practice.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The most significant of these books for Kerouac was A Buddhist Bible by Dwight Goddard.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

In 1955 Kerouac wrote a biography of Siddhartha Gautama, entitled Wake Up, which was unpublished during his lifetime but eventually serialised in Tricycle: The Buddhist Review, 1993–95. It was published by Viking in September 2008.[25]
House in Orlando, Florida where Kerouac lived and wrote The Dharma Bums
.In 1957, after being rejected by several other firms, On the Road was finally purchased by Viking Press, which demanded major revisions prior to publication.^ Fifty years ago this week Viking Press published Jack Kerouac’s novel “On The Road”.
  • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

^ AMY GOODMAN: Fifty years ago this week, Viking Press published Jack Kerouac’s novel On the Road .
  • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

^ When `On the road` was finally published in September 1957 it caught the critics off guard.
  • Subterranean Homesick Jack - a knol by Peter Daltrey 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

[23] .Many of the more sexually explicit passages were removed and, fearing libel suits, pseudonyms were used for the book's "characters". These revisions have often led to criticisms of the alleged spontaneity of Kerouac's style.^ Using Benzedrine and coffee, Kerouac wrote the entire novel in only three weeks in an extended session of spontaneous prose, his original writing style, heavily influenced by Jazz (especially BeBop), and later Buddhism.

^ Kerouac’s connection with the texts condensed in Goddard’s book is obvious when reading Dharma.As an anthology of Buddhist texts, Goddard supplied Kerouac, as well as many Westerners, with the opportunity to become familiar with various Buddhist sources and to study the dharma more comprehensively.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

^ This was Ferlinghetti's defense of Kerouac, a letter to TIME magazine written after the publication of Big Sur in 1962 and also after the ragged, wrenching, bad review of the novel by the TIME magazine book critic.
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

[22]

Later career 1957–1969

.In July 1957, Kerouac moved to a small house at 1418½ Clouser Avenue in the College Park section of Orlando, Florida, to await the release of On the Road.^ College Park section of Orlando, Florida to await the release of On the Road .
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ In July 1957, Kerouac moved to a small house on Clouser Ave.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ So we're going to start with 1957, a very important year for Kerouac, the year On the Road gets published.
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

.A few weeks later, the review appeared in the New York Times proclaiming Kerouac the voice of a new generation.^ A few weeks later, the review appears in the New York Times proclaiming Kerouac the voice of a new generation.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ A few lines later Kerouac continues: .
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

^ But Ferlinghetti is loyal to him, and as a friend he helps Kerouac out of a jam when he invites him to get away from the publicity that surrounds the film, The Subterraneans , a few years later, in 1960.
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

.Kerouac was hailed as a major American writer.^ Kerouac was hailed as a major American writer, and reluctantly as the voice of the Beat Generation.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ When On the Road was published in 1957, Jack was instantly hailed as a major American writer, and thrust into the spotlight as the reluctant spokesman for the 'Beat Generation.'"
  • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

^ Jack Kerouac (pronounced [dʒæk ˈkɛɹəwæk] ) (March 12, 1922 – October 21, 1969) was an American novelist, writer, poet, and artist.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

.His friendship with Allen Ginsberg, William S. Burroughs and Gregory Corso, among others, became a notorious representation of the Beat Generation.^ Kerouac's friendship with Allen Ginsberg, William S. Burroughs and Gregory Corso, among others, defined a generation.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ His friendship with Allen Ginsberg , William Burroughs and George Whitman , among others, defined a generation.

^ It was during this time that he met the people with whom he was later to journey around the world, the subjects of many of his novels: the so-called Beat Generation, including Allen Ginsberg, Neal Cassady, John Clellon Holmes, Herbert Huncke and William S. Burroughs.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

.His fame would come as an unmanageable surge that would ultimately be his undoing.^ His fame would come as an unmanagable surge that would ultimately be his undoing.

.Kerouac's novel is often described as the defining work of the post-World War II Beat Generation and Kerouac came to be called "the king of the beat generation,"[26] a term that he never felt comfortable with.^ Kerouac's novel is often described as the defining work of the post-World War II Beat Generation and Kerouac came to be called "the king of the beat generation," a term that he never felt comfortable with, and once observed, I'm not a beatnik, I'm a Catholic.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ The novel is often described as the defining work of the post-World War II jazz -, poetry -, and drug -affected Beat Generation ; it made Kerouac "the king of the beat generation."

^ It was during this time that he met the people with whom he was later to journey around the world, the subjects of many of his novels: the so-called Beat Generation, including Allen Ginsberg, Neal Cassady, John Clellon Holmes, Herbert Huncke and William S. Burroughs.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

.He once observed, "I'm not a beatnik, I'm a Catholic."^ Kerouac's novel is often described as the defining work of the post-World War II Beat Generation and Kerouac came to be called "the king of the beat generation," a term that he never felt comfortable with, and once observed, I'm not a beatnik, I'm a Catholic.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

[27]
.The success of On the Road brought Kerouac instant fame.^ The immediate success of On the Road established Kerouacs reputation as a prominent member and leading spokesman of a new generation of writers, the Beats.
  • Jack Kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.univie.ac.at [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

He soon found he had little taste for celebrity status. After nine months, he no longer felt safe in public. .He was badly beaten by three men outside the San Remo Bar in New York one night.^ One night we talked on the corner of 47th Street and Madison at three in the morning.

^ AMY GOODMAN: Drank himself to death in New York outside the White Horse Tavern.
  • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

^ Right after the Second World War, I tried to get on New York newspapers, but there were two people for every New York newspaper job: the one that had it before the war and the one that filled in.
  • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

.Neal Cassady, possibly as a result of his new notoriety as the central character of the book, was set up and arrested for selling marijuana.^ Kerouac, Ginsberg, Cassady and Holmes himself were central characters in the book.
  • Subterranean Homesick Jack - a knol by Peter Daltrey 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

^ The book was largely autobiographical, narrated from the point of view of the character Sal Paradise, describing Kerouac's roadtrip adventures across the United States and Mexico with Neal Cassady, the model for the character of Dean Moriarty.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ Think of the books, man, a whole new series: The Dharma Bums Grow Up , The Dharma Bums on Wall Street .
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

[28][29]
Publishers were eager for a quick "sequel" to capitalize on On the Road's success. .In response, Kerouac chronicled parts of his own experience with Buddhism, as well as some of his adventures with Gary Snyder and other San Francisco-area poets, in The Dharma Bums, set in California and Washington and published in 1958. It was written in Orlando between November 26[30] and December 7, 1957.[31] To begin writing Dharma Bums, Kerouac typed onto a ten-foot length of teletype paper, to avoid interrupting his flow for paper changes, as he had done six years previously for On the Road.^ On the Road wouldn't be published for another 7 years.

^ He chronicled parts of this, as well as some of his adventures with Gary Snyder , in the book The Dharma Bums , set in Northern California and published in 1958 .

^ Jack Kerouac wrote in response to Gary Snyder's suggestion that he write his first Sutra.

[30]
.Kerouac was demoralized by criticism of Dharma Bums from such respected figures in the American field of Buddhism as Zen teacher Ruth Fuller Sasaki and Alan Watts.^ Author: kerouac , Title: dharma bums .
  • kerouac - dharma bums - AbeBooks 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.abebooks.com [Source type: General]

^ Kerouac was influenced both by Buddhist texts and by practicing North American Buddhists whom he encountered in his travels, including Gary Snyder—‘Japhy Ryder’ of The Dharma Bums—who was a student and practitioner of Zen.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Books such as The Dharma Bums, The Subterraneans and Mexico City Blues revealed how important Buddhism had become to the Catholic Kerouac.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

He wrote to Snyder, referring to a meeting with D. T. Suzuki, that "even Suzuki was looking at me through slitted eyes as tho I was a monstrous imposter." He passed up the opportunity to reunite with Snyder in California, and explained to Whalen, "I'd be ashamed to confront you and Gary now I've become so decadent and drunk and dontgiveashit. I'm not a Buddhist any more."[32]
.Kerouac also wrote and narrated a "Beat" movie entitled Pull My Daisy in 1959. Originally to be called "The Beat Generation," the title was changed at the last moment when MGM released a film by the same name which sensationalized "beatnik" culture.^ I wasn’t a member of the original Beat Generation.
  • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

^ Kerouac also wrote and narrated a "Beat" movie entitled Pull My Daisy in 1958.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ Pull My Daisy [1961] .

.John Antonelli's 1985 documentary Kerouac, the Movie begins and ends with footage of Kerouac reading from On the Road and Visions of Cody on The Tonight Show with Steve Allen in 1957. Kerouac appears intelligent but shy.^ Kerouac appears intelligent but shy.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ John Antonelli's 1985 documentary Kerouac, the Movie begins and ends with footage of Kerouac reading from On the Road and "Visions of Cody" from The Tonight Show with Steve Allen in 1957.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ R.H. Blyth’s monumental, four-volume book, Haiku appeared at the end of the 1940s, from 1949 to 1952, at exactly the moment when the Beat movement was beginning to stir.
  • Jack Foley. Beat Haiku - Terebess Asia Online (TAO) 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.terebess.hu [Source type: Original source]

"Are you nervous?" asks Steve Allen. ."Naw," says Kerouac, sweating and fidgeting.^ "Naw", says Kerouac, sweating and fiddling.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

[citation needed]
.Kerouac developed something of a friendship with the scholar Alan Watts (cryptically named Arthur Wayne in Kerouac's novel Big Sur, and Alex Aums in Desolation Angels).^ Kerouac developed something of a friendship with the scholar Alan Watts (cryptically named Arthur Wayne in Kerouac's novel Big Sur , and Alex Aums in Desolation Angels ).

^ AC : Come visit me in California, which was an experience resulting of course in the novel Big Sur , that alcoholic breakdown on the Pacific coast at Ferlinghetti's cabin.
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

^ Kerouac's motto was "first-thought=best thought", and many of his books exemplified this approach including On the Road , Visions of Cody , Visions of Gerard , Big Sur , and The Subterraneans .

.Kerouac moved to Northport, New York in March 1958, six months after releasing On the Road, to care for his aging mother Gabrielle and to hide from his new-found celebrity status.^ In between sea voyages, Kerouac stayed in New York with friends from Fordham University in The Bronx.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ With four manuscripts rejected by publishers in New York -- On the road; Visions of Cody, (extended notes from `Road); Doctor Sax; and Maggie Cassidy -- Kerouac took the Greyhound to San Francisco to be a brakeman in San Luis Obispo.
  • Subterranean Homesick Jack - a knol by Peter Daltrey 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

^ After leaving Columbia Kerouac spent two unsettled years in the US Marine before returning to New York where he met and fell in love with Edie Parker.
  • Subterranean Homesick Jack - a knol by Peter Daltrey 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

Politics

.In his later life, Kerouac was a politically conservative Catholic, especially under the influence of his mother and father.^ Kerouac's method was heavily influenced by the prolific explosion of Jazz, especially the Bebop genre established by Charlie Parker , Dizzy Gillespie , Thelonious Monk , and others.

^ Using Benzedrine and coffee, Kerouac wrote the entire novel in only three weeks in an extended session of spontaneous prose, his original writing style, heavily influenced by Jazz (especially BeBop), and later Buddhism.

^ The notion of suffering, besides being the cornerstone of Buddhist philosophy, was especially appropriate for Kerouac as his life appears to have revolved around the anguish that his own lifestyle created.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

He supported the Vietnam War and was friendly with William F. Buckley, Jr..[33]

Death

Kerouac died on October 21, 1969 at St. Anthony's Hospital in St. Petersburg, Florida, one day after being rushed with severe abdominal pain from his St. Petersburg home by ambulance.
Lowell, Massachusetts Grave site, Lowell Massachusetts
.His death, at the age of 47, resulted from an internal hemorrhage (bleeding esophageal varices) caused by cirrhosis, the result of a lifetime of heavy drinking.^ His death, at the age of 47, resulted from an internal hemorrhage (bleeding esophageal varices) caused by cirrhosis of the liver, the result of a lifetime of heavy drinking.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ He died on October 21 , 1969 at St. Anthony's Hospital in St. Petersburg , Florida , from an internal hemorrhage at the age of 47, the unfortunate result of a life of heavy drinking.

^ Kerouac died in St. Petersburg, Florida, at the age of 47 from an internal hemorrhage, the result of alcoholism.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

[34][35] Kerouac is buried in his home town of Lowell and was honored posthumously with a Doctor of Letters degree from his hometown's University of Massachusetts Lowell on June 2, 2007.
.At the time of his death, he was living with his third wife, Stella Sampas Kerouac, and his mother, Gabrielle.^ At the time of his death, he was living with his third wife Stella, and his mother Gabrielle.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ He was living at the time with his third wife Stella, and his mother Gabrielle.

^ At the time of his death in 1969, Kerouac's estate was worth little more than ninety-one dollars, but by 2004 had grown to an estimated $20 million.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

.Kerouac's mother inherited most of his estate.^ In his will Jack Kerouac left his entire estate to his mother.
  • Subterranean Homesick Jack - a knol by Peter Daltrey 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

^ Kerouac divided most of his young adult life between roaming the vast American landscape and life at home with his mother.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

When she died in 1973, Stella inherited the rights to his works under a purported will. Family members challenged the will and, on July 24, 2009, a judge in Pinellas County, Florida ruled that the will of Gabrielle Kerouac was a forgery.[36]
.In 2007, to coincide with the 50th anniversary of On the Road's publishing, Viking issued two new editions: On the Road: The Original Scroll, and On the Road: 50th Anniversary Edition.^ JF : Viking of course published On the Road .
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

^ Cowley wanted Jack to write a new book for Viking after On the Road made the bestseller list.
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

^ Kerouac's On The Road Scroll will be coming to Lowell, MA, during the summer of 2007.

[37][38] .By far the more significant is Scroll, a transcription of the original draft typed as one long paragraph on sheets of tracing paper which Kerouac taped together to form a 120-foot (37 m) scroll.^ Kerouac typed it on a scroll singlespaced with no margins or paragraph breaks.
  • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

^ Kerouac typed it on a scroll, single-spaced with no margins or paragraph breaks.
  • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

^ Kerouac displays an unusual form of compassion in the midst of the above-described dilemma; he shows that he is the one who sings happily and toasts to [That] as he, too, swirls down the drain.

.The text is more sexually explicit than Viking allowed to be published in 1957, and also uses the real names of Kerouac's friends rather than the fictional names he later substituted.^ Kerouac understood it to be religion rather than fiction.
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

^ However, they are slowly realizing that Kerouac's creative force was more than 'just typing' (per Truman Capote), and are gradually accepting him into the ranks of "Great American Writers."

^ But Ferlinghetti is loyal to him, and as a friend he helps Kerouac out of a jam when he invites him to get away from the publicity that surrounds the film, The Subterraneans , a few years later, in 1960.
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

Indianapolis Colts owner Jim Irsay paid $2.43 million for the original scroll and allowed an exhibition tour that concluded at the end of 2009. The other new issue, 50th Anniversary Edition, is a reissue of the 40th anniversary issue under an updated title.
.In March 2008, Penguin Books announced that the Kerouac/Burroughs manuscript, And the Hippos Were Boiled in Their Tanks would be published for the first time in November 2008.[39] Previously, a fragment of the manuscript had been published in the Burroughs compendium, Word Virus.^ During Kerouac's time at Columbia University , Burroughs and Kerouac got into trouble with the law for failing to report a murder; this incident formed the basis of a mystery novel the two collaborated on in 1945 entitled And the Hippos Were Boiled in Their Tanks (the novel was never published, although an excerpt from the manuscript would be included in the Burroughs compilation Word Virus ).

^ Kerouac had also recently read the manuscript of William Borroughs first novel, `Junkie.` .
  • Subterranean Homesick Jack - a knol by Peter Daltrey 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

^ Kerouac’s early biographer, Ann Charters, writes that “In the six years it took Jack to publish On the Road, he wrote twelve books”: .
  • Jack Foley. Beat Haiku - Terebess Asia Online (TAO) 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.terebess.hu [Source type: Original source]

[40] .Grove Press published the first American edition of the novel on Nov.^ AMY GOODMAN: Fifty years ago this week, Viking Press published Jack Kerouac’s novel On the Road .
  • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

^ Fifty years ago this week Viking Press published Jack Kerouac’s novel “On The Road”.
  • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

^ It was the first pro-Fidel book published, and “an American tragedy” was the tragedy of our stupid foreign policy.
  • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

1, 2008.

Works, style, and innovations

Style

.Kerouac is generally considered to be the father of the Beat movement, although he actively disliked such labels, and, in particular, regarded the subsequent Hippie movement with some disdain.^ Kerouac is considered by some as the King of the Beats as well as the Father of the Hippies , although it must be said that he actively disliked such labels, and, in particular, regarded the Hippie movement with some disdain.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ Kerouac is considered by some as the "King of the Beats" as well as the "Father of the Hippies".
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ Kerouac is considered by some as the "King of the Beatniks " as well as the "Father of the Hippies ".

.Kerouac's method was heavily influenced by the prolific explosion of Jazz, especially the Bebop genre established by Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, Thelonious Monk, and others.^ Kerouac's method was heavily influenced by the prolific explosion of Jazz, especially the Bebop genre established by Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonious Monk, and others.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ Kerouac's method was heavily influenced by the prolific explosion of Jazz, especially the Bebop genre established by Charlie Parker , Dizzy Gillespie , Thelonious Monk , and others.

^ Jazz is the Beats favourite music; jazz rhythmics and melodiousness color Kerouacs prose; the immediacy of sound made the music of Charlie Parker, Dizzie Gillespie and Lester Young, its ease and readiness for improvisation, the most adequate form of artistic expression, inviting imitation on a literary level.
  • Jack Kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.univie.ac.at [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Later, Kerouac would include ideas he developed in his Buddhist studies, beginning with Gary Snyder.^ Later, Kerouac would include ideas he developed in his Buddhist studies, beginning with Gary Snyder.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ Gary Snyder was greatly admired by Kerouac, and many of his ideas influenced Kerouac.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ Later, Kerouac would include ideas he developed in his Buddhist studies.

.He often referred to his style as Spontaneous prose, a literary technique akin to stream of consciousness.^ He called this style Spontaneous Prose , a literary technique akin to stream of consciousness .

^ He called this style Spontaneous Prose, a literary technique akin to stream of consciousness.
  • Jack Kerouac :: English Language Poet :: English Poetry 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poet.me.uk [Source type: General]

^ Among the writings he set down specifically about his Spontaneous Prose method, the most concise would be Belief and Technique for Modern Prose , a list of thirty "essentials".

.Although Kerouac’s prose was spontaneous and purportedly without edits, he primarily wrote autobiographical novels (or Roman à clef) based upon actual events from his life and the people with whom he interacted.^ In 1951, Kerouac wrote his most famous novel, On the Road, based on his adventures with Neal Cassady.
  • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

^ Using Benzedrine and coffee, Kerouac wrote the entire novel in only three weeks in an extended session of spontaneous prose, his original writing style, heavily influenced by Jazz (especially BeBop), and later Buddhism.

^ It was in New York that Kerouac met the people with whom he was to journey around the world, and the subjects of many of his novels: the so-called Beat Generation , which included people such as Allen Ginsberg , Neal Cassady and William S. Burroughs .

Jack Kerouac's poem in the center of his namesake alley.
.Many of his books exemplified this approach including On the Road, Visions of Cody, Visions of Gerard, Big Sur, and The Subterraneans.^ Kerouac's motto was "first-thought=best thought", and many of his books exemplified this approach including On the Road , Visions of Cody , Visions of Gerard , Big Sur , and The Subterraneans .

^ His books show an extraordinary love of life and all of its experiences whether good or bad, even Big Sur and Visions of Codey are (while gloomy at times) documentaries of what it feels like to be human.
  • Misremembering Jack Kerouac | Books | guardian.co.uk 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.guardian.co.uk [Source type: General]

^ At an early age, he was profoundly marked by the death of his elder brother Grard, later prompting him to write the book Visions of Gerard .

.The central features of this writing method were the ideas of breath (borrowed from Jazz and from Buddhist meditation breathing), improvising words over the inherent structures of mind and language, and not editing a single word (much of his work was edited by Donald Merriam Allen, a major figure in Beat Generation poetry who also edited some of Ginsberg's work as well).^ The central features of this writing method was the idea of breath (borrowed from Jazz), improvising words over the inherent structures of mind and language, and not editing a single word.

^ He would go on for hours to friends and strangers about his method, often drunk, which wasn't well received by Ginsberg, who had an acute awareness of the need to sell literature (to publishers) as much as write it; though he'd later be one of its great proponents.

^ And so, when I went to France on the GI Bill and got a doctorate at the Sorbonne, by then it was 1951, and I figured, well, I’d just try some other city.
  • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

.Connected with his idea of breath was the elimination of the period, preferring to use a long, connecting dash instead.^ Connected with his idea of breath was the elimination of the period , preferring to use a long, connecting dash instead.

^ Here Kerouac merely shapes the descriptive paragraph in a simple manner, which includes the use of dashes as markers of breath.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

.As such, the phrases occurring between dashes might resemble improvisational jazz licks.^ As such, the phrases occurring between dashes might resemble improvisational jazz licks.

.When spoken, the words might take on a certain kind of rhythm, though none of it pre-meditated.^ When spoken, the words might take on a certain kind of rhythm, though none of it pre-meditated.

.Kerouac greatly admired Gary Snyder, many of whose ideas influenced him.^ Kerouac was influenced both by Buddhist texts and by practicing North American Buddhists whom he encountered in his travels, including Gary Snyder—‘Japhy Ryder’ of The Dharma Bums—who was a student and practitioner of Zen.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

^ JF : Kerouac is furious when Gary Snyder gives him a paper that a young woman who's been studying with Snyder writes about him.
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

^ Jack Kerouac wrote in response to Gary Snyder's suggestion that he write his first Sutra.

.The Dharma Bums contains accounts of a mountain climbing trip Kerouac took with Snyder, and also whole paragraphs from letters Snyder had written to Kerouac.^ Kerouac was influenced both by Buddhist texts and by practicing North American Buddhists whom he encountered in his travels, including Gary Snyder—‘Japhy Ryder’ of The Dharma Bums—who was a student and practitioner of Zen.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Books such as The Dharma Bums, The Subterraneans and Mexico City Blues revealed how important Buddhism had become to the Catholic Kerouac.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Think of the books, man, a whole new series: The Dharma Bums Grow Up , The Dharma Bums on Wall Street .
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

[41] .While living with Snyder outside Mill Valley, California in 1956, Kerouac was working on a book centering around Snyder, which he was thinking of calling Visions of Gary.^ Kerouac's motto was "first-thought=best thought", and many of his books exemplified this approach including On the Road , Visions of Cody , Visions of Gerard , Big Sur , and The Subterraneans .

^ Kerouac was so taken with Goddard’s book that he memorized pages of text and a couple of times in Dharma one can find Goddard’s California address.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

^ He chronicled parts of this, as well as some of his adventures with Gary Snyder , in the book The Dharma Bums , set in Northern California and published in 1958 .

[42] .(This eventually became Dharma Bums, which Kerouac described as "mostly about [Snyder]."^ That was when Kerouac wrote The Dharma Bums , which was the second and last book Kerouac did for Viking because they didn't want him after that.
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

^ Kerouac’s main focus in Dharma came to rest mostly on the notion of suffering and its causes.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Kerouac was influenced both by Buddhist texts and by practicing North American Buddhists whom he encountered in his travels, including Gary Snyder—‘Japhy Ryder’ of The Dharma Bums—who was a student and practitioner of Zen.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

)[43] .That summer, Kerouac took a job as a fire lookout on Desolation Peak in the North Cascades in Washington, after hearing Snyder's and Philip Whalen's accounts of their own lookout stints.^ Kerouac, Ginsberg, Snyder, and Whalen spent time together in Berkeley in 1955 talking, drinking, and trading their own versions of...haiku translations.” .
  • Jack Foley. Beat Haiku - Terebess Asia Online (TAO) 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.terebess.hu [Source type: Original source]

^ With the help of people like Allen Ginsberg, Gary Snyder and Philip Whalen, Buddhism began to flourish in America, particularly in California.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

.Kerouac described the experience in his novel Desolation Angels.^ The novel is often described as the defining work of the post-World War II jazz -, poetry -, and drug -affected Beat Generation ; it made Kerouac "the king of the beat generation."

^ Kerouac developed something of a friendship with the scholar Alan Watts (cryptically named Arthur Wayne in Kerouac's novel Big Sur , and Alex Aums in Desolation Angels ).

^ Kerouac described an experience of unconsciousness in which he realized upon awakening that everything is all right forever.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

.He would go on for hours, often drunk, to friends and strangers about his method.^ He would go on for hours to friends and strangers about his method, often drunk, which wasn't well received by Ginsberg, who had an acute awareness of the need to sell literature (to publishers) as much as write it; though he'd later be one of its great proponents.

^ Among the writings he set down specifically about his Spontaneous Prose method, the most concise would be Belief and Technique for Modern Prose , a list of thirty "essentials".

^ Broughton's work (if I may generalize about them without going back to reread them to be certain) also lack many of the requirements for haiku, and thus I would say they are not haiku -- though they are often fun and witty, as well as brief.
  • Jack Foley. Beat Haiku - Terebess Asia Online (TAO) 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.terebess.hu [Source type: Original source]

Allen Ginsberg, initially unimpressed, would later be one of its great proponents, and indeed, he was apparently influenced by Kerouac's free flowing prose method of writing in the composition of his masterpiece "Howl." It was at about the time that Kerouac wrote The Subterraneans that he was approached by Ginsberg and others to formally explicate his style. .Among the writings he set down specifically about his Spontaneous Prose method, the most concise would be Belief and Technique for Modern Prose, a list of thirty "essentials."^ Among the writings he set down specifically about his Spontaneous Prose method, the most concise would be Belief and Technique for Modern Prose , a list of thirty "essentials".

^ He called this style Spontaneous Prose , a literary technique akin to stream of consciousness .

^ It was at about the time that Kerouac wrote The Subterraneans that he was approached by Ginsberg and others to formally explicate exactly how he wrote it, how he did Spontaneous Prose.

  1. Scribbled secret notebooks, and wild typewritten pages, for your own joy
  2. Submissive to everything, open, listening
  3. Try never get drunk outside your own house
  4. Be in love with your life
  5. Something that you feel will find its own form
  6. Be crazy dumbsaint of the mind
  7. Blow as deep as you want to blow
  8. Write what you want bottomless from bottom of the mind
  9. The unspeakable visions of the individual
  10. No time for poetry but exactly what is
  11. Visionary tics shivering in the chest
  12. In tranced fixation dreaming upon object before you
  13. Remove literary, grammatical and syntactical inhibition
  14. Like Proust be an old teahead of time
  15. Telling the true story of the world in interior monolog
  16. The jewel center of interest is the eye within the eye
  17. Write in recollection and amazement for yourself
  18. Work from pithy middle eye out, swimming in language sea
  19. Accept loss forever
  20. Believe in the holy contour of life
  21. Struggle to sketch the flow that already exists intact in mind
  22. Don't think of words when you stop but to see picture better
  23. Keep track of every day the date emblazoned in yr morning
  24. No fear or shame in the dignity of yr experience, language & knowledge
  25. Write for the world to read and see yr exact pictures of it
  26. Bookmovie is the movie in words, the visual American form
  27. In praise of Character in the Bleak inhuman Loneliness
  28. Composing wild, undisciplined, pure, coming in from under, crazier the better
  29. You're a Genius all the time
  30. Writer-Director of Earthly movies Sponsored & Angeled in Heaven
."The only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn, like fabulous yellow Roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars, and in the middle, you see the blue center-light pop, and everybody goes ahh..."^ It’s like ‘burn, burn, burn, like a Roman candle’—I think that’s a paraphrase of a passage in Kerouac.
  • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

^ Add as Favorite Send message RSS Location OURS! Title Traffic Negotiator Company Planet Earth Bio The only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn, like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars...
  • Race Still Matters - Sparking - Open Salon 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC open.salon.com [Source type: Original source]

^ But then they danced down the streets like dingledodies, and I shambled after as I've been doing all my life after people who interest me, because the only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones that never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars and in the middle you see the blue centerlight pop and everybody goes 'Awww!'

from On the Road
.Some believed that at times Kerouac's writing technique did not produce lively or energetic prose.^ Among the writings he set down specifically about his Spontaneous Prose method, the most concise would be Belief and Technique for Modern Prose , a list of thirty "essentials".

^ It was at about the time that Kerouac wrote The Subterraneans that he was approached by Ginsberg and others to formally explicate exactly how he wrote it, how he did Spontaneous Prose.

^ Kerouac had been living in Northport for some time and it is fortunate that these rare haiku have been recorded and kept.

Truman Capote famously said about Kerouac's work, "That's not writing, it's typing." Despite such criticism, it should be kept in mind that what Kerouac said about writing and how he wrote are sometimes seen to be separate. .According to Carolyn Cassady and other people who knew him he rewrote and rewrote.^ And he had helped two people who had written him.
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

^ Those who prefer people of other races are also racist, because they are making decisions about their likes and dislikes on the basis of racial stereotypes.
  • Race Still Matters - Sparking - Open Salon 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC open.salon.com [Source type: Original source]

^ JF : There was a flip side to that for Cassady himself---a sense that he was set up to be busted because the cops knew who he was from On the Road .
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

Some claim his own style was in no way spontaneous. .However it should be taken into account that throughout most of the '50s, Kerouac was constantly trying to have his work published, and consequently he often revised and re-arranged manuscripts in an often futile attempt to interest publishers, as is clearly documented in his collected letters (which are in themselves wonderful examples of his style).^ One should keep in mind that Kerouac was attempting to reconcile his lifestyle with his newfound interest in Buddhism when he began to write this text in 1953.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Something about Kerouac's work which interests me is his reading haiku to jazz accompaniment.
  • Jack Foley. Beat Haiku - Terebess Asia Online (TAO) 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.terebess.hu [Source type: Original source]

^ At this point, certain aspects of Beat style have been assimilated into the mainstream of American culture, but for the Beats themselves, to be was to be other.
  • Jack Foley. Beat Haiku - Terebess Asia Online (TAO) 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.terebess.hu [Source type: Original source]

.The Subterraneans and Visions of Cody are possibly the best examples of Kerouac's free-flowing spontaneous prose method.^ Among the writings he set down specifically about his Spontaneous Prose method, the most concise would be Belief and Technique for Modern Prose , a list of thirty "essentials".

^ The ‘spontaneous prose’ that became Kerouac’s hallmark was simply one of the unconventional techniques he employed in the writing of Dharma.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Kerouac was pioneering a stylistic revolution, forever changing the nature and content of his writing ...Abandoning conventional techniques of editing and revision, Kerouac committed himself to a new method, the practice of spontaneous prose’ (Tonkinson 1995, 23 – 4).
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

.Although the body of Kerouac's work has been published in English, recent research has suggested that, aside from already known correspondence and letters written to friends and family, he also wrote unpublished works of fiction in French.^ Much is known about Kerouac, his life, his family and friends.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Kerouac's best known work is On the Road .

^ At some point in his life Kerouac wrote Wake Up , a biography of Siddhartha Gautama (better known as the Buddha ) that remains unpublished.

.A manuscript entitled Sur le Chemin (On the road) completed in five days in Mexico during December 1952 is a telling example of Kerouac's attempts at writing in Joual,[44] a dialect typical of the French-Canadian working class of the time, which can be summarized as a form of expression utilising both old patois and modern French mixed with modern English words (windshield being a modern English expression used casually by some French Canadians even today).^ After completing her doctorate she worked with Jack Kerouac on a bibliography of his writings.
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

^ Mine was more—my writing was more in the European tradition, like I would say some of the same authors that affected Kerouac greatly affected me, like Marcel Proust and James Joyce, and we had the same backgrounds, and we both spoke French.
  • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

^ As private, manuscript texts, the 'Lives' were able to contain the richly controversial material which is their chief interest, and Aubrey's chief contribution to the formation of modern biographical writing.
  • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

.Set in 1935, mostly on the American east coast, The short manuscript (50 pages), explores some of the recurring themes of Kerouac's literature by way of a narrative very close to, if not identical to the spoken word.^ Kerouac’s main focus or argument in Some of the Dharma is presented to the reader in an original and rarely seen way.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

^ You could very well work in communications in some way and will want to be remembered for the touches of inspiration in your field.

^ JACK KEROUAC: So in the last page of On the Road , I describe how the hero Dean Moriarty has come to see me all the way from the West Coast just for a day or two.
  • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

.It tells the story of a group of men who agree to meet in New York, including a young 13-year-old Kerouac whom he refers to as Ti-Jean.^ Kerouac was influenced both by Buddhist texts and by practicing North American Buddhists whom he encountered in his travels, including Gary Snyder—‘Japhy Ryder’ of The Dharma Bums—who was a student and practitioner of Zen.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

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  • Johnny Depp - Jack Kerouac | SPIKE 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]

^ It was in New York that Kerouac met the people with whom he was to journey around the world, and the subjects of many of his novels: the so-called Beat Generation , which included people such as Allen Ginsberg , Neal Cassady and William S. Burroughs .

.Ti-Jean and his father Leo (Kerouac's father's real name) leave Boston by car, traveling to assist friends looking for a place to stay in the city.^ He wrote about friends, places, and people he met in his travels.

^ They had been traveling in this car together with others for several months, and the year later he looked right through her at some other occasion.
  • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

^ In between his sea voyages, Kerouac stayed in New York with friends from Fordham .

.The story actually follows two cars and their passengers, one driving out of Denver and the other from Boston until they eventually meet in a dingy bar in New York's Chinatown.^ Kerouac and others used what they understood of haiku as a way of entering into a new kind of American poetry.
  • Jack Foley. Beat Haiku - Terebess Asia Online (TAO) 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.terebess.hu [Source type: Original source]

^ He set out with three others for that island; the plan failed when a promised government grant never eventuated.
  • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

^ They had gone to New York and Washington to get money, financial aid, and they were turned down, and then he was desperate for money, and he turned to the Soviet Union for money.
  • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

In it, Kerouac's "French" is written in a form which has little regard for grammar or spelling, relying often on phonetics in order to render an authentic reproduction of his French-Canadian vernacular. .Kerouac does not only use Joual freely but frequently confuses grammatical word genders and verb tenses, a phenomenon typical to the francophone speech pattern of the assimilated French Canadians of the American east coast at the time.^ Kerouac and others used what they understood of haiku as a way of entering into a new kind of American poetry.
  • Jack Foley. Beat Haiku - Terebess Asia Online (TAO) 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.terebess.hu [Source type: Original source]

^ Does the approach that Kerouac took and the substitutions of Buddhist expressions allow us to classify his teachings as a new American form of Buddhism?
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

^ By using repetitive motifs and less ‘heady’ wording, Kerouac has provided a translation of Surangama that is understandable for the average Westerner.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

[45] .Even though this work shares the same title as one of his best known English novels, it is rather the original French version of a short text that would later become Old bull in the Bowery (also unpublished) once translated to English prose by Kerouac himself.^ (Kerouac sometimes worked his haiku into prose passages in his novels.
  • Jack Foley. Beat Haiku - Terebess Asia Online (TAO) 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.terebess.hu [Source type: Original source]

^ Kerouac's best known work is On the Road .

^ Using Benzedrine and coffee, Kerouac wrote the entire novel in only three weeks in an extended session of spontaneous prose, his original writing style, heavily influenced by Jazz (especially BeBop), and later Buddhism.

.Sur le Chemin is Kerouac's second known French manuscript, the first being La nuit est ma Femme written in early 1951 and completed a few days before he began the original English version of On the Road.^ Kerouac's best known work is On the Road .

^ The second quotation is from a book of poems written by Jack Kerouac in San Francisco in the year 1954.
  • Jack Foley. Beat Haiku - Terebess Asia Online (TAO) 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.terebess.hu [Source type: Original source]

^ It was at moments like this that Kerouac’s practice of Buddhism became his second priority, as his first was the bliss he felt while drunk.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

Influences

.Kerouac's technique was heavily influenced by Jazz, especially Bebop, and later, Buddhism, as well as the famous "Joan Anderson letter" authored by Neal Cassady.^ In 1951, Kerouac wrote his most famous novel, On the Road, based on his adventures with Neal Cassady.
  • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

^ Kerouac's method was heavily influenced by the prolific explosion of Jazz, especially the Bebop genre established by Charlie Parker , Dizzy Gillespie , Thelonious Monk , and others.

^ Using Benzedrine and coffee, Kerouac wrote the entire novel in only three weeks in an extended session of spontaneous prose, his original writing style, heavily influenced by Jazz (especially BeBop), and later Buddhism.

[46]
The Diamond Sutra was the most important Buddhist text for Kerouac, and "probably one of the three or four most influential things he ever read."[47] In 1955, he began an intensive study of this sutra, in a repeating weekly cycle, devoting one day to each of the six Pāramitās, and the seventh to the concluding passage on Samādhi. This was his sole reading on Desolation Peak, and he hoped by this means to condition his mind to emptiness, and possibly to have a vision.[48]

Legacy

Kerouac has been cited as an influence by Wakefield band The Ran-Tan Waltz and is mentioned in their song "The Beat Generation".
.Kerouac is considered by some as the "King of the Beats,"[26] a title with which Kerouac himself was deeply uncomfortable.^ Kerouac is considered by some as the "King of the Beatniks " as well as the "Father of the Hippies ".

^ The novel is often described as the defining work of the post-World War II jazz -, poetry -, and drug -affected Beat Generation ; it made Kerouac "the king of the beat generation."

^ Kerouac also wrote and narrated a "Beat" movie titled Pull My Daisy in 1958 .

[citation needed]
.Kerouac's plainspeak manner of writing prose, as well as his nearly long-form free verse style of novelistic "neologism," inspired countless beat writers and neo-beat writers and artists, such as painter George Condo, as well as poets and philosophers such as Roger Craton and filmmaker John McNaughton, etc.^ If you don’t have to be a poet, be a prose writer.
  • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

^ But he was well acquainted with the Beat poets evidently.
  • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

^ Kerouac's spontaneous, confessional language style inspired other writers, including Tom Robbins , Richard Brautigan , Hunter S. Thompson , Ken Kesey , and Bob Dylan .

.In 1974 the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics was opened in his honor by Allen Ginsberg and Anne Waldman at Naropa University, a private Buddhist University in Boulder, Colorado.^ JF : That's true, and, when you know that, you see him writing a letter to Allen Ginsberg in which he's carefully using Yiddishisms---Kerouac's trying to sound Jewish!
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

^ Kerouac’s early biographer, Ann Charters, writes that “In the six years it took Jack to publish On the Road, he wrote twelve books”: .
  • Jack Foley. Beat Haiku - Terebess Asia Online (TAO) 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.terebess.hu [Source type: Original source]

^ AMY GOODMAN: Jack Kerouac, accompanied on piano by Steve Allen.
  • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

The school offers an MFA in Writing & Poetics, a BA in Writing and Literature, a Summer Writing Program, and MFA in Creative Writing.[49] From 1978 to 1992, Joy Walsh published 28 issues of a magazine devoted to Kerouac, Moody Street Irregulars.
In 1997, the house on Clouser Avenue where The Dharma Bums was written was purchased by a newly formed non-profit group entitled The Jack Kerouac Writers in Residence Project of Orlando, Inc. This group continues to this day to provide aspiring writers to live in the same house Kerouac was inspired in, with room and board covered, for three months.
.In 2007, Kerouac was awarded a posthumous honorary degree from the University of Massachusetts Lowell.^ Kerouac was born Jean-Louis Lebris de Kerouac , in Lowell, Massachusetts , to a family of Franco-Americans.

^ Kerouac's On The Road Scroll will be coming to Lowell, MA, during the summer of 2007.

^ Jack Kerouac is buried in Lowell, Massachusetts in the Edson Cemetery located off Gorham Street [you can find his gravesite at the intersection of Seventh and Lincoln.

[50]
.In 2009, a movie entitled "One Fast Move or I'm Gone - Kerouac's Big Sur" was released.^ His books were remaindered, including Big Sur , which was one of the ways I got to afford to buy them, on the remainder tables, when I started collecting Kerouac in the mid-sixties.
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

^ This was Ferlinghetti's defense of Kerouac, a letter to TIME magazine written after the publication of Big Sur in 1962 and also after the ragged, wrenching, bad review of the novel by the TIME magazine book critic.
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

^ I will be having a few drinks in his memory tonight and watching the new 'Big Sur' documentary that was released specially on DVD today.
  • Misremembering Jack Kerouac | Books | guardian.co.uk 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.guardian.co.uk [Source type: General]

.It chronicles the time in Kerouac's life which led to his novel Big Sur.^ His books were remaindered, including Big Sur , which was one of the ways I got to afford to buy them, on the remainder tables, when I started collecting Kerouac in the mid-sixties.
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

^ This was Ferlinghetti's defense of Kerouac, a letter to TIME magazine written after the publication of Big Sur in 1962 and also after the ragged, wrenching, bad review of the novel by the TIME magazine book critic.
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

^ Why don't you read the letter Ferlinghetti wrote defending Kerouac---specifically defending Big Sur .
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

.The movie documents various actors, writers, artists, and close friends giving their insight into the book.^ Even though this text was constructed into various techniques and divided into 10 books, Kerouac stated how the text has no form.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

^ A book of his haikus and dreams also were published, giving interesting insight into how his mind worked.

.The movie also sheds light on the real people and places on which Kerouac based his characters and settings, including the cabin in Bixby Canyon.^ One of the book's main characters, Japhy Ryder, is based on the real poet Gary Snyder, who was a close friend and whose interest in Buddhism influenced Kerouac.
  • Jack Kerouac - Lulu.com 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.lulu.com [Source type: General]

^ Kerouac was cognizant of the impact he was having on the young people of the 1950s and 1960s generations—but what he really wanted was to teach Buddhism, not simply to garner attention.
  • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

.An album was released to accompany the movie, titled "One Fast Move or I'm Gone". It features Benjamin Gibbard (Death Cab for Cutie) and Jay Farrar (Son Volt) who perform songs based on Kerouac's Big Sur.^ His books were remaindered, including Big Sur , which was one of the ways I got to afford to buy them, on the remainder tables, when I started collecting Kerouac in the mid-sixties.
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

^ This was Ferlinghetti's defense of Kerouac, a letter to TIME magazine written after the publication of Big Sur in 1962 and also after the ragged, wrenching, bad review of the novel by the TIME magazine book critic.
  • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

^ I will be having a few drinks in his memory tonight and watching the new 'Big Sur' documentary that was released specially on DVD today.
  • Misremembering Jack Kerouac | Books | guardian.co.uk 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.guardian.co.uk [Source type: General]

Bibliography

Discography

Studio albums
Compilation albums
  • The Jack Kerouac Collection (1990) [Box] (Audio CD Collection of 3 studio albums)

References

  1. ^ McGrath, Charles. "Another Side of Kerouac: The Dharma Bum as Sports Nut," New York Times (May 15, 2009). Accessed May 16, 2009.
  2. ^ The view from On the road: the ... - Google Books. Books.google.com. http://books.google.com/books?id=PNRHQ96szrsC&pg=PA4&lpg=PA4&dq=kerouac+iconoclast+literary&source=bl&ots=vAaUkb3MRu&sig=jTp_7Y-Ty25vUwdoXe-ChfGNZ2U&hl=en&ei=g7wbS57gNpT0sQOjkYX6Bw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CCgQ6AEwCTgo#v=onepage&q=&f=false. Retrieved 2010-01-29. 
  3. ^ "Jack Kerouac's Visions of Gerard". Beatdom.com. http://www.beatdom.com/jack_kerouacs_visions_of_gerard.htm. Retrieved 2010-01-29. 
  4. ^ "On the Road (Criticism): Information from". Answers.com. 2010-01-14. http://www.answers.com/topic/on-the-road-novel-7. Retrieved 2010-01-29. 
  5. ^ Countering the counterculture ... - Google Books. Books.google.com. http://books.google.com/books?id=F5QXB-1D8kgC&pg=PA110&lpg=PA110&dq=kerouac+progenitor+hippie&source=bl&ots=GYCnOk1IGI&sig=5HXeMT3EqOvycT_0w2pT010ai9Y&hl=en&ei=w7gbS7jGJ5L-sgPDtOj8BA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=5&ved=0CBUQ6AEwBA#v=onepage&q=kerouac%20progenitor%20hippie&f=false. Retrieved 2010-01-29. 
  6. ^ a b Nicosia, Gerald- Memory Babe: A Critical Biography of Jack Kerouac, 1983.
  7. ^ Moore, D., 'The Breton Traveller', in Wills, D. (ed.) Beatdom Vol. 4 (Mauling Press: Dundee, 2009)
  8. ^ Berrigan, Ted (1968). "The Art of Fiction No. 43: Jack Kerouac, pg. 49" (PDF). The Paris Review. http://www.parisreview.com/media/4260_KEROUAC.pdf. Retrieved 2008-05-14. 
  9. ^ Dagier, Patricia (2009). Jack Kerouac, Breton d'Amérique. Editions Le Télégramme. 
  10. ^ Deleuze and Guattari (1972) Anti-Oedipus pp. 305, 144
  11. ^ Nicosia, Gerald (October 17, 2004). "Real Kerouac". San Francisco Chronicle. http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2004/10/17/RVGU695CDD1.DTL. Retrieved 2008-04-29. 
  12. ^ Esposito, Carmine (July 18, 2005). "Kerouac, Jack". glbtq.com. http://www.glbtq.com/literature/kerouac_j.html. Retrieved 2008-04-29. 
  13. ^ Anctil, Gabriel (September 5, 2007). "Les 50 ans d'On the Road - Kerouac voulait écrire en français". Le Devoir. http://www.ledevoir.com/2007/09/05/155613.html. Retrieved 2008-04-29. 
  14. ^ Patrick J. Mogan Cultural Center, University of Massachusetts Lowell. "1930 Black History Census Study, from: A Higher Home: An Exhibit on African-Americans in the Lowell Area during the 20th Century". http://ecommunity.uml.edu/blackhistory/pdf/cen_stu_1930.pdf. Retrieved 2008-05-14. 
  15. ^ Sarna, Jonathan D. & Golden, Jonathan (October, 2000). "The American Jewish Experience in the Twentieth Century: Antisemitism and Assimilation". National Humanities Center. http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/tserve/twenty/tkeyinfo/jewishexp.htm. Retrieved 2008-05-15. 
  16. ^ Miles 1998, pg. 8
  17. ^ Berrigan 1968, pg. 14
  18. ^ "Hit The Road, Jack". The Smoking Gun. September 5, 2005. http://www.thesmokinggun.com/archive/0906052_jack_kerouac_1.html. Retrieved 2008-04-29. 
  19. ^ Fenton, Patrick (1997). "THE WIZARD OF OZONE PARK". Dharma Beat. http://www.wordsareimportant.com/ozonepark.htm. Retrieved 2008-05-27. 
  20. ^ Kilgannon, Corey (November 10, 2005). "On the Road, the One Called Cross Bay Boulevard". New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2005/11/10/nyregion/10ink.html. Retrieved 2008-04-29. 
  21. ^ Wolf, Stephen (November 21–27, 2007). "An epic journey through the life of Jack Kerouac". The Villager. http://www.thevillager.com/villager_238/anepic.html. Retrieved 2008-05-14. 
  22. ^ a b Sante, Luc (August 19, 2007). "On the Road Again". New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/19/books/review/Sante2-t-1.html. Retrieved 2008-05-10. 
  23. ^ a b Shea, Andrea (July 5, 2007). "Jack Kerouac's Famous Scroll, 'On the Road' Again". NPR. http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=14112461. Retrieved 2008-04-29. 
  24. ^ Dictionary of Literary Biography. "Jan Kerouac Biography". Dictionary of Literary Biography. http://www.bookrags.com/biography/jan-kerouac-dlb/. Retrieved 2008-05-10. 
  25. ^ "Wake Up! on Amazon.com". http://www.amazon.com/Wake-Up-Buddha-Jack-Kerouac/dp/0670019577/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1228158449&sr=1-1. Retrieved 2008-12-01. 
  26. ^ a b "Beat Generation Elders Meet to Praise Kerouac". New York Times. http://partners.nytimes.com/books/97/09/07/home/kerouac-conference.html. Retrieved 2008-12-16. 
  27. ^ http://www.nytimes.com/books/97/09/07/home/kerouac-obit.html
  28. ^ Suiter 2002, pg. 237
  29. ^ Berrigan 1968, pg. 19–20
  30. ^ a b Suiter, John (2002). Poets on the Peaks Gary Snyder, Philip Whalen, and Jack Kerouac in the North Cascades. Counterpoint. p. 229. ISBN 1582431485. 
  31. ^ Suiter 2002, pg. 233
  32. ^ Suiter 2002, pp. 242–243
  33. ^ American Museum of Beat Art
  34. ^ "Author Kerouac Dies; Led 'Beat Generation'". Daily Collegian. October 22, 1969. http://digitalnewspapers.libraries.psu.edu/Default/Skins/BasicArch/Client.asp?Skin=BasicArch&&AppName=2&enter=true&BaseHref=DCG/1969/10/22&EntityId=Ar00402. Retrieved 2008-04-29. 
  35. ^ "For Kerouac, Off the Road and Deep Into the Bottle, a Rest Stop on the Long Island Shore". The New York Times. December 31, 2006. http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/31/nyregion/31kerouac.html. Retrieved 2008-12-23. 
  36. ^ "Judge Rules Kerouac Will a Forgery" Associated Press (July 28, 2009)
  37. ^ "Uncensored 'On the Road' to be published". MSNBC. July 26, 2006. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/14045410/. Retrieved 2008-04-29. 
  38. ^ Bignell, Paul & Johnson, Andrew (July 29, 2007). "On the Road (uncensored). Discovered: Kerouac 'cuts'". The Independent. http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/books/news/on-the-road-uncensored-discovered-kerouac-cuts-459446.html. Retrieved 2008-04-29. 
  39. ^ "New Kerouac-Burroughs book due out". United Press International. March 2, 2008. http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/Entertainment/2008/03/02/new_kerouac-burroughs_book_due_out/2264/. Retrieved 2008-04-29. 
  40. ^ Burroughs, William (1998). Word virus. Grove Press. p. 576. ISBN 0802116299. 
  41. ^ Suiter 2002, pg. 186
  42. ^ Suiter 2002, pg. 189
  43. ^ Suiter 2002, pg. 228
  44. ^ He refers to it in a letter addressed to Neil Cassady (who is commonly known as his inspiration for the character of Dean Moriarty) written on January 10, 1953
  45. ^ The novel starts: Dans l'mois d'Octobre 1935, y'arriva une machine du West, de Denver, sur le chemin pour New York. Dans la machine était Dean Pomeray, un soûlon; Dean Pomeray Jr., son ti fils de 9 ans et Rolfe Glendiver, son step son, 24. C'était un vieille Model T Ford, toutes les trois avaient leux yeux attachez sur le chemin dans la nuit à travers la windshield.
  46. ^ Cassady, Neal (1964). The First Third. Underground Press. p. 387. OCLC 42789161. 
  47. ^ Suiter 2002, pg. 191
  48. ^ Suiter 2002, pg. 210
  49. ^ "The Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics". Naropa University. http://www.naropa.edu/academics/graduate/writingpoetics/index.cfm. Retrieved 2008-05-10. 
  50. ^ "UMass Lowell Honors Jack Kerouac, U.S. Rep. John Lewis". University of Massachusetts. May 23, 2007. http://www.uml.edu/Media/PressReleases/Commencement_2007.html. Retrieved 2008-04-29. 

Further reading

  • Amburm, Ellis. .Subterranean Kerouac: The Hidden Life of Jack Kerouac.^ Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; .
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Jack Kerouac, American beat novelist, born on March 12, 1922, Subterraneans I'd rather be thin than famous.
    • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

    ^ A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac JACK FOLEY Copyright © 2001 Poetry Flash .
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    St. Martin's Press, 1999. ISBN 0-312-20677-1
  • Amram, David. Offbeat: Collaborating with Kerouac. Thunder's Mouth Press, 2002.ISBN 1-56025-362-2
  • Bartlett, Lee (ed.) The Beats: Essays in Criticism. London: McFarland, 1981.
  • Beaulieu, Victor-Lévy. Jack Kerouac: A Chicken Essay. Coach House Press, 1975.
  • Brooks, Ken. The Jack Kerouac Digest. Agenda, 2001.
  • Cassady, Carolyn. Neal Cassady Collected Letters, 1944-1967. Penguin, 2004. ISBN 0-14-200217-8
  • Cassady, Carolyn. .Off the Road: Twenty Years with Cassady, Kerouac and Ginsberg.^ In 1951, Kerouac wrote his most famous novel, On the Road, based on his adventures with Neal Cassady.
    • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

    ^ I'll be honest, I've only read On The Road, and that's put me off Kerouac for life.
    • Misremembering Jack Kerouac | Books | guardian.co.uk 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.guardian.co.uk [Source type: General]

    ^ Kerouac’s early biographer, Ann Charters, writes that “In the six years it took Jack to publish On the Road, he wrote twelve books”: .
    • Jack Foley. Beat Haiku - Terebess Asia Online (TAO) 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.terebess.hu [Source type: Original source]

    Black Spring Press, 2007.
  • Challis, Chris. Quest for Kerouac. Faber & Faber, 1984.
  • Charters, Ann. Kerouac. .San Francisco: Straight Arrow Books, 1973.
  • Charters, Ann (ed.^ And then, customs in San Francisco were holding the books, and they finally released them after the US attorney refused to prosecute.
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Ann Charters wrote the very first biography of Jack Kerouac, Kerouac: A Biography , which came out in 1973.
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Lawrence Ferlinghetti , poet and co-founder of the San Francisco bookstore and publishing house City Lights Books .
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    ) .The Portable Beat Reader.^ She became the general editor of a two-volume encyclopedia The Beats: Literary Bohemians in Postwar America , and edited The Portable Beat Reader and The Portable Jack Kerouac Reader .
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    New York: Penguin, 1992.
  • Charters, Ann (ed.) .The Portable Jack Kerouac.^ She became the general editor of a two-volume encyclopedia The Beats: Literary Bohemians in Postwar America , and edited The Portable Beat Reader and The Portable Jack Kerouac Reader .
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    New York: Penguin, 1995.
  • Christy, Jim. .The Long Slow Death of Jack Kerouac.^ Jack Kerouac Mankind is like dogs, not gods as long as you don't get mad they'll bite you but stay mad and you'll never be bitten.
    • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

    ECW Press, 1998.
  • Clark, Tom. Jack Kerouac. Harcourt, Brace, Jovanovich, 1984.
  • Coolidge, Clark. .Now It's Jazz: Writings on Kerouac & the Sounds.^ JF : That's true, and, when you know that, you see him writing a letter to Allen Ginsberg in which he's carefully using Yiddishisms---Kerouac's trying to sound Jewish!
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    Living Batch, 1999.
  • Cook, Bruce. The Beat Generation. Charles Scribner's Sons, 1971. ISBN 0-684-12371-1
  • Dagier, Patricia; Quéméner, Hervé. Jack Kerouac: Au Bout de la Route ... La Bretagne. An Here, 1999.
  • Dagier, Patricia ; Quéméner Hervé. Jack Kerouac, Breton d'Amérique. Editions Le Télégramme, 2009.
  • Edington, Stephen. Kerouac's Nashua Roots. Transition, 1999.
  • Ellis, R.J., Liar! Liar! .Jack Kerouac - Novelist.^ Jack Kerouac, American beat novelist, born on March 12, 1922 .
    • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Jack Kerouac, American beat novelist, born on March 12, 1922, Subterraneans I'd rather be thin than famous.
    • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

    Greenwich Exchange, 1999.
  • French, Warren. Jack Kerouac. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1986.
  • Gaffié, Luc. .Jack Kerouac: The New Picaroon.^ And she has, I'm sure, many new insights to add to the work of Jack Kerouac.
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    Postillion Press, 1975.
  • Giamo, Ben. "Kerouac, The Word and The Way". Southern Illinois University Press, 2000.
  • Gifford, Barry. "Kerouac's Town". Creative Arts, 1977.
  • Gifford, Barry; Lee, Lawrence. "Jack's Book: An Oral Biography of Jack Kerouac". St. Martin's Press, 1978. ISBN 0-14-005269-0
  • Goldstein, N.W., "Kerouac's On the Road." .Explicator 50.1. 1991.
  • Haynes, Sarah, "An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism:Text and Life"
  • Heller, Christine Jack Kerouac and Gary Snyder: Chasing Zen Clouds
  • Hemmer, Kurt.^ JF : Kerouac is furious when Gary Snyder gives him a paper that a young woman who's been studying with Snyder writes about him.
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Contrary to these dismissals, a thorough examination of Jack Kerouac's "Mexico City Blues" displays his earnest practice and understanding of Mahayana Buddhism.

    ^ One of the book's main characters, Japhy Ryder, is based on the real poet Gary Snyder, who was a close friend and whose interest in Buddhism influenced Kerouac.
    • Jack Kerouac - Lulu.com 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.lulu.com [Source type: General]

    ."Encyclopedia of Beat Literature: The Essential Guide to the Lives and Works of the Beat Writers". Facts on File, Inc., 2007.
  • Hipkiss, Robert A., "Jack Kerouac: Prophet of the New Romanticism". Regents Press, 1976.
  • Holmes, John Clellon.^ When On the Road was published in 1957, Jack was instantly hailed as a major American writer, and thrust into the spotlight as the reluctant spokesman for the 'Beat Generation.'"
    • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

    ^ AMY GOODMAN: Fifty years ago this week, Viking Press published Jack Kerouac’s novel On the Road .
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    ^ DHARMA BEAT: A Jack Kerouac newszine The Beat Museum .
    • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

    ."Visitor: Jack Kerouac in Old Saybrook". tuvoti, 1981.
  • Holmes, John Clellon.^ In 1986, a book of her photographic portraits called Beats & Company , with a foreword by John Clellon Holmes was published.
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    "Gone In October: Last Reflections on Jack Kerouac". Limberlost, 1985.
  • Holton, Robert. "On the Road: Kerouac's Ragged American Journey". Twayne, 1999.
  • Hrebeniak, Michael. ."Action Writing: Jack Kerouac"s Wild Form," Carbondale IL., Southern Illinois UP, 2006.
  • Huebel, Harry Russell.^ Posted: November 20, 2006 Description: Johhny Depp reads Jack Kerouac.
    • Johnny Depp - Jack Kerouac | SPIKE 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]

    ^ He would have been the right editor for Kerouac if he could have opened himself up to noncommercial writing.
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Jack Kerouac wrote in response to Gary Snyder's suggestion that he write his first Sutra.

    "Jack Kerouac". Boise State University, 1979. available online
  • Hunt, Tim. "Kerouac's Crooked Road". Hamden: Archon Books, 1981.
  • Jarvis, Charles. ."Visions of Kerouac". Ithaca Press, 1973.
  • Johnson, Joyce.^ Joyce Johnson has prepared a book, similar to the format of this selected letters, of her correspondence with Jack Kerouac.
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    ."Minor Characters: A Young Woman's Coming-Of-Age in the Beat Orbit of Jack Kerouac". Penguin Books, 1999.
  • Johnson, Joyce.^ JF : Kerouac is furious when Gary Snyder gives him a paper that a young woman who's been studying with Snyder writes about him.
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Your snide, sneering, condescending, semi-literate, semi-dishonest, spiteful attack on Jack Kerouac and his latest book, BIG SUR, is disgusting.
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    ^ She became the general editor of a two-volume encyclopedia The Beats: Literary Bohemians in Postwar America , and edited The Portable Beat Reader and The Portable Jack Kerouac Reader .
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    ."Door Wide Open: A Beat Love Affair in Letters, 1957-1958". Viking, 2000.
  • Johnson, Ronna C., "You're Putting Me On: Jack Kerouac and the Postmodern Emergence". College Literature.^ You will find that your personal magnetism opens up doors for you even without you realising the reason why.

    ^ AMY GOODMAN: Fifty years ago this week, Viking Press published Jack Kerouac’s novel On the Road .
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; .
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    .27.1 2000.
  • Jones, James T., "A Map of Mexico City Blues: Jack Kerouac as Poet". Southern Illinois University Press, 1992.
  • Jones, James T., "Jack Kerouac's Duluoz Legend". Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1999.
  • Jones, Jim.^ Fifty years ago this week Viking Press published Jack Kerouac’s novel “On The Road”.
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    ^ [The unabridged Book of Dreams by Jack Kerouac has just been published for the first time, as he intended it, by City Lights Books.
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Although Kerouac claimed to be drawn to Mahayana Buddhism's emphasis on compassion, "Mexico City Blues" reveals only a small influence of the compassionate, but examines in depth many less central Mahayana tenets.

    "Use My Name: Kerouac's Forgotten Families". ECW Press, 1999.
  • Jones, Jim. ."Jack Kerouac's Nine Lives". Elbow/Cityful Press, 2001.
  • Kealing, Bob.^ AMY GOODMAN: Fifty years ago this week, Viking Press published Jack Kerouac’s novel On the Road .
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Contrary to these dismissals, a thorough examination of Jack Kerouac's "Mexico City Blues" displays his earnest practice and understanding of Mahayana Buddhism.

    ^ Fifty years ago this week Viking Press published Jack Kerouac’s novel “On The Road”.
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    ."Kerouac in Florida: Where the Road Ends". Arbiter Press, 2004.
  • Kerouac, Joan Havery.^ Fifty years ago this week Viking Press published Jack Kerouac’s novel “On The Road”.
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    ^ AMY GOODMAN: Fifty years ago this week, Viking Press published Jack Kerouac’s novel On the Road .
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Fifty years ago this year Viking Press published Jack Kerouac’s novel On The Road.
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    "Nobody's Wife: The Smart Aleck and the King of the Beats". Creative Arts, 2000.
  • Maher Jr., Paul. "Kerouac: The Definitive Biography". Lanham: Taylor Trade P, July 2004 ISBN 0-87833-305-3
  • McNally, Dennis. ."Desolate Angel: Jack Kerouac, the Beat Generation, and America". Da Capo Press, 2003. ISBN 0-306-81222-3
  • Miles, Barry.^ AMY GOODMAN: Fifty years ago this week, Viking Press published Jack Kerouac’s novel On the Road .
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Fifty years ago this week Viking Press published Jack Kerouac’s novel “On The Road”.
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Jack Kerouac , reading “On The Road” As the literary world marks the 50th anniversary of the publication of “On The Road” we spend the hour today with Lawrence Ferlinghetti, a leading literary figure of the Beat Generation.
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    "Jack Kerouac: King of the Beats". Virgin, 1998.
  • Montgomery, John. ."Jack Kerouac: A Memoir ...". Giligia Press, 1970.
  • Montgomery, John.^ AMY GOODMAN: Fifty years ago this week, Viking Press published Jack Kerouac’s novel On the Road .
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Fifty years ago this week Viking Press published Jack Kerouac’s novel “On The Road”.
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Fifty years ago this year Viking Press published Jack Kerouac’s novel On The Road.
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    "Kerouac West Coast". Fels & Firn Press, 1976.
  • Montgomery, John. "The Kerouac We Knew". Fels & Firn Press, 1982.
  • Montgomery, John. ."Kerouac at the Wild Boar". Fels & Firn Press, 1986.
  • Mortenson, Erik R., "Beating Time: Configurations of Temporality in Jack Kerouac's On the Road". College Literature 28.3. 2001.
  • Motier, Donald.^ Sean O'Hagan on Jack Kerouac's dazzling novel On the Road .
    • Misremembering Jack Kerouac | Books | guardian.co.uk 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.guardian.co.uk [Source type: General]

    ^ In this early interview John Wingate asks what the Beat Generation writers want and what Kerouac was supposedly doing in On the Road .
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    ^ They were together about eighteen months, a very important time for Jack, when On the Road was published.
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    ."Gerard: The Influence of Jack Kerouac's Brother on his Life and Writing". Beaulieu Street Press, 1991.
  • Nicosia, Gerald.^ Fifty years ago this week Viking Press published Jack Kerouac’s novel “On The Road”.
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Charters writes: "I realized after meeting Kerouac that the reality of the man was tragic, but the mark of his genius had been to create novels out of the tragedy of his own life.
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    ^ After completing her doctorate she worked with Jack Kerouac on a bibliography of his writings.
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    ."Memory Babe: A Critical Biography of Jack Kerouac". Berkeley: U of Cal P, 1994. ISBN 0-520-08569-8
  • Parker, Brad.^ Ann Charters wrote the very first biography of Jack Kerouac, Kerouac: A Biography , which came out in 1973.
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    ."Jack Kerouac: An Introduction". Lowell Corporation for the Humanities, 1989.
  • Sandison, David.^ That's not the Jack buried beneath the flat headstone in the cemetery just outside the town of Lowell , about 30 miles outside of Boston, where Kerouac grew up.
    • Misremembering Jack Kerouac | Books | guardian.co.uk 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.guardian.co.uk [Source type: General]

    "Jack Kerouac". Hamlyn, 1999.
  • Swartz, Omar. ."The View From On the Road: The Rhetorical Vision of Jack Kerouac". Southern Illinois University Press, 1999.
  • Swick, Thomas.^ Sean O'Hagan on Jack Kerouac's dazzling novel On the Road .
    • Misremembering Jack Kerouac | Books | guardian.co.uk 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.guardian.co.uk [Source type: General]

    ^ AMY GOODMAN: Fifty years ago this week, Viking Press published Jack Kerouac’s novel On the Road .
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    ^ On The Road, by Jack Kerouac .

    ."South Florida Sun Sentinel". February 22, 2004. Article: "Jack Kerouac in Orlando".
  • Theado, Matt.^ The fat, depressed, apparently antisemitic Jack Kerouac who died after throwing his guts up in the toilet in St Petersburg, Florida – that's not the Jack we like to remember.
    • Misremembering Jack Kerouac | Books | guardian.co.uk 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.guardian.co.uk [Source type: General]

    ^ Tags: depp • jack • johhny • kerouac • short films Posted By: rybthr Videos: 7 Articles: 0 More From User Hung Up - Madonnna (Video Remix) .
    • Johnny Depp - Jack Kerouac | SPIKE 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]

    ^ MEXICAN MAHAYANA: Tracking Jack Kerouac's Dharma Trail Down South .

    ."Understanding Jack Kerouac". Columbia: University of South Carolina, 2000.
  • Turner, Steve.^ AMY GOODMAN: Jack Kerouac, accompanied on piano by Steve Allen.
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Contrary to these dismissals, a thorough examination of Jack Kerouac's "Mexico City Blues" displays his earnest practice and understanding of Mahayana Buddhism.

    ^ Renowned scholar Ann Charters began her thirty year career as a student, teacher, and collector of Beat literature when she was still a graduate student at Columbia University (where both Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg had preceded her as undergraduates).
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    ."Angelheaded Hipster: A Life of Jack Kerouac". Viking Books, 1996. ISBN 0-670-87038-2
  • Walsh, Joy, editor.^ Cowley wanted Jack to write a new book for Viking after On the Road made the bestseller list.
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    ^ AMY GOODMAN: Fifty years ago this week, Viking Press published Jack Kerouac’s novel On the Road .
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; .
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    Moody Street Irregulars: A Jack Kerouac Newsletter
  • Weinreich, Regina. ."The Spontaneous Prose of Jack Kerouac". Southern Illinois University Press, 1987.
  • Wills, David, editor.^ Fifty years ago this week Viking Press published Jack Kerouac’s novel “On The Road”.
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    ^ AMY GOODMAN: Fifty years ago this week, Viking Press published Jack Kerouac’s novel On the Road .
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Fifty years ago this year Viking Press published Jack Kerouac’s novel On The Road.
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    "Beatdom Magazine". Mauling Press, 2007.

External links


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

All our best men are laughed at in this nightmare land.
.Jack Kerouac (1922-03-12 - 1969-10-21), born Jean-Louis Lebris Kerouac, was an American novelist, poet and artist.^ In March of 1922, Jean-Louis Lebris de Kerouac was born in Lowell, Massachusetts.
  • Biography: Jack Kerouac - American Authors - Helium 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.helium.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Jack Kerouac (March 12, 1922 October 21, 1969) was an American novelist, writer, poet, artist, and part of the Beat Generation.
  • Kerouac, Jack quote - I have lots of things to teach you now, in case we ever meet, concerni... 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.quotationsbook.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Jack Kerouac born, Lowell, Massachusetts.
  • Jack Kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.rotten.com [Source type: General]

.He was a central figure among Beat Generation writers.^ He was a central figure among Beat Generation writers.
  • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Jack Kerouac (March 12, 1922 October 21, 1969) was an American novelist, writer, poet, artist, and part of the Beat Generation.
  • Kerouac, Jack quote - I have lots of things to teach you now, in case we ever meet, concerni... 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.quotationsbook.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The 'Beat' generation stemmed from a post-war awareness of materialism and death, and this mindset reflected itself in the abandonment of mainstream ideals by its central figures.
  • On the Road by Jack Kerouac | LibraryThing 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.librarything.com [Source type: General]

See also Maggie Cassidy, On the Road and The Dharma Bums

Contents

Sourced

I want to fish as deep down as possible into my own subconscious in the belief that once that far down, everyone will understand because they are the same that far down.
Who knows, but that the universe is not one vast sea of compassion actually, the veritable holy honey, beneath all this show of personality and cruelty?
All is well, practice kindness, heaven is nigh.
.
All human beings are also dream beings.
^ All human beings are also dream beings.
  • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Jack Kerouac Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Atop an Underwood: Early Stories and Other Writings (1999) All human beings are also dream beings.
  • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

^ So much square-rootedness blocks the dream of a new country being born, though the spiritual quest unclogs all and leads still to Africa it seems.
  • Jazz/Jerry Jazz Musician/David Amram discusses Jack Kerouac in an exclusive interview with Jerry Jazz Musician 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.jerryjazzmusician.com [Source type: General]

.Dreaming ties all mankind together.
  • Maybe that's what life is...^ Dreaming ties all mankind together.
    • Jack Kerouac at Kerouac Alley 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.kerouacalley.com [Source type: General]
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • Jack Kerouac Quotes :: Quoteland :: Quotations by Author 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.quoteland.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I transcribed all the letters myself, and they were checked for accuracy of transcription, but it was putting it together as a life in letters that I was trying to do, with the commentaries giving you the context of the letters, historical and biographical.
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    ^ And unfortunately, he never managed to gather all his autobiographical novels together in a uniform binding published with the names of the "real life" people returned to them.
    • Penguin Reading Guides | On the Road | Jack Kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC us.penguingroup.com [Source type: General]
    • On the Road (Literature Guide) - TeacherVision.com 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.teachervision.fen.com [Source type: General]

    a wink of the eye and winking stars.
    .
    • Letter to Alan Harrington (1949) published in Kerouac: Selected Letters: Volume 1 1940-1956 (1996)
  • All of life is a foreign country.
    • Letter (24 June 1949), published in The Beat Vision: A Primary Sourcebook (1987) edited by Arthur Knight and Kit Knight
  • I want to work in revelations, not just spin silly tales for money.^ Kerouac and the Beats: a primary sourcebook .
    • PAL: Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC web.csustan.edu [Source type: Academic]

    ^ JACK KEROUAC: Selected Letters 1940-1956 edited by Ann Charters.
    • The Only People For Him - 96.08 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.theatlantic.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All of life is a foreign country.

    .I want to fish as deep down as possible into my own subconscious in the belief that once that far down, everyone will understand because they are the same that far down.
    • Letter to Ed White (5 July 1950) as quoted in Jack Kerouac: Angelheaded Hipster (1996) by Steve Turner, p.^ Hendler Jack Kerouac quote .
      • Jack Kerouac quotes 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC thinkexist.com [Source type: General]

      ^ I want to fish as deep as possible into my own subconscious in the belief that once that far down, everyone will understand because they are the same that far down.'

      ^ I want to fish as deep down as possible into my own subconscious in the belief that once that far down, everyone will understand because they are the same that far down."

      .117
  • I hope it is true that a man can die and yet not only live in others but give them life, and not only life but that great consciousness of life.
  • Accept loss forever
    • "Belief & Technique For Modern Prose: List of Essentials" in a letter to Don Allen (1958); published in Heaven & Other Poems (1977)
  • Believe in the holy contour of life
    • "Belief & Technique For Modern Prose: List of Essentials" in a letter to Don Allen (1958); published in Heaven & Other Poems (1977)
  • We should be wondering tonight, "Is there a world?" But I could go and talk on 5, 10, 20 minutes about is there a world, because there is really no world, cause sometimes I'm walkin' on the ground and I see right through the ground.^ We should be wondering tonight, "Is there a world?"

    ^ Because there is no definite teaching: the world is undisciplined.

    ^ I hope it is true that a man can die and yet not only live in others but give them life, and not only life, but that great consciousness of life.
    • Jack Kerouac at Kerouac Alley 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.kerouacalley.com [Source type: General]
    • Jack Kerouac quotes 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC thinkexist.com [Source type: Original source]

    .And there is no world.^ And there is no world.

    ^ There's no place for me in such a world.
    • Real Kerouac / The Beat writer's journals reveal a man apart from his persona - SFGate 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC articles.sfgate.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ At that time, "[T]he world knew that Kerouac was from Lowell, yet within the city of Lowell there had been no official recognition."
    • 2007 Jack Kerouac Memorial Game at the COSMIC BASEBALL ASSOCIATION 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.cosmicbaseball.com [Source type: General]

    .And you'll find out.^ First you'll have to find one.
    • Gerald's Blog - Jack Kerouac, Typist 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.geraldhausman.com [Source type: General]

    ^ And you'll find out.

    ^ If title is "out of stock", click link and let me know you are looking for it & I'll find a replacement copy.
    • thephildickian.com - Jack Kerouac and the Beats. 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thephildickian.com [Source type: General]

    .
    • "Is There A Beat Generation?"^ "Is There A Beat Generation?"
      • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Young people often ask me whether there could ever be another Beat Generation, forgetting one essential tenet of the beat writers: make it new.
      • Remembering Jack Kerouac | Music & Literature | Smithsonian Magazine 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.smithsonianmag.com [Source type: General]
      • Remembering Jack Kerouac | Music & Literature | Smithsonian Magazine 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.smithsonianmag.com [Source type: General]

      ^ There is no question but when he does speak out of the Beat Generation, he is their authentic voice.
      • Jack Kerouac (Rexroth) 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.bopsecrets.org [Source type: Original source]

      forum at Hunter College, New York, New York (8 November 1958)
  • Who knows, but that the universe is not one vast sea of compassion actually, the veritable holy honey, beneath all this show of personality and cruelty? .
    • "Is There A Beat Generation?"^ "Is There A Beat Generation?"
      • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Young people often ask me whether there could ever be another Beat Generation, forgetting one essential tenet of the beat writers: make it new.
      • Remembering Jack Kerouac | Music & Literature | Smithsonian Magazine 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.smithsonianmag.com [Source type: General]
      • Remembering Jack Kerouac | Music & Literature | Smithsonian Magazine 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.smithsonianmag.com [Source type: General]

      ^ There is no question but when he does speak out of the Beat Generation, he is their authentic voice.
      • Jack Kerouac (Rexroth) 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.bopsecrets.org [Source type: Original source]

      forum at Hunter College (8 November 1958)
  • John Clellon Holmes ... and .I were sitting around trying to think up the meaning of the Lost Generation and the subsequent Existentialism and I said, 'You know, this is really a beat generation' and he leapt up and said 'That's it, that's right!'
    • "The Origins of the Beat Generation" in Playboy (June 1959), explaining the origins of the term the "Beat Generation".
  • I went one afternoon to the church of my childhood and had a vision of what I must have really meant with "Beat"...^ I wasn’t a member of the original Beat Generation.
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    ^ "You do one if you want to," Roger said.
    • Jack Kerouac, On the Road, Beat movement - Yankee Magazine 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.yankeemagazine.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Do you know what I mean?
    • http://www.writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88v/kerouac-per-coolidge.html 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.writing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    the vision of the word .Beat as being to mean beatific...
    People began to call themselves beatniks, beats, jazzniks, bopniks, bugniks and finally I was called the "avatar" of all this.^ He writes to Gary Snyder on June 24, 1957, "I mean why on earth…aren't people CONTINUALLY DRUNK?…I want ecstasy of the mind all the time."
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Most people read “Big Sur” as Jack’s "crackup" but I see it as as a kind of Last Testament, where Kerouac sees through all his illusions, his illusions of Beatness, his illusions of being a great writer, his illusions of alcoholism, ultimately his illusions of self.

    ^ There is this whole sense of, on the one hand, being high---and he wants ecstasy all the time, he wants to be high all the time---but if you're high, that also means you have to come down from it, which means low .
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    .
    • "The Origins of the Beat Generation" in Playboy (June 1959)
  • Members of the generation that came of age after World War II-Korean War who join in a relaxation of social and sexual tensions, and who espouse anti-regimentation, mystic-disaffiliation, and material-simplicity values, supposedly as a result of cold-war disillusionment.^ I wasn’t a member of the original Beat Generation.
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Originated the term "Beat Generation."
    • Jack Kerouac - Biography 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.imdb.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Origin of the term "Beat Generation" .
    • http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A187391 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.bbc.co.uk [Source type: General]

    .Coined by Jack Kerouac.^ Coined by Jack Kerouac."
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Jack Kerouac was among the first - perhaps the first - who coined the phrase 'the beat generation', source of the word 'beatnik'.

    ^ Coined by Jack Kerouac.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Definition of "Beat Generation" offered to Random House publishers in 1959, after being asked him if there was anything he'd like to add to the definition they were preparing for the American College Dictionary: "Certain members of the generation that came of age after World War II who affect detachment from moral and social forms and responsibilities, supposedly the result of disillusionment.^ They were members of the generation that Kerouac would later call "Beat."
      • Jack Kerouac: The Beat Goes On 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC partners.nytimes.com [Source type: General]

      ^ I wasn’t a member of the original Beat Generation.
      • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

      ^ It’s as if they weren’t there for him.
      • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

      .Coined by Jack Kerouac."^ Coined by Jack Kerouac."
      • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Jack Kerouac was among the first - perhaps the first - who coined the phrase 'the beat generation', source of the word 'beatnik'.

      ^ Coined by Jack Kerouac.
      • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .The Random House definition eventually published read: "members of the generation that came of age after World War II who, supposedly as a result of disillusionment stemming from the Cold War, espoused forms of mysticism and the relaxation of social and sexual inhibitions."
  • It is not my fault that certain so-called bohemian elements have found in my writings something to hang their peculiar beatnik theories on.^ It is not my fault that certain so-called bohemian elements have found in my writings something to hang their peculiar beatnik theories on.

    ^ Admirers say the writing combines the rhythm of jazz, the madness of drug addiction and the emptiness of post-World War II America.
    • Celebrating 50 years of "On the Road" with Jack Kerouac — JSCMS 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC jscms.jrn.columbia.edu [Source type: General]

    ^ The radio soap opera is something of an easy target in this case, and Burroughs eventually found much more complex relationships between his random source material and his own writing, elevating genre fiction and pornography to artistic heights through nearly incomprehensible layering.
    • Young Bull and Old Jack | Open Letters Monthly - an Arts and Literature Review 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.openlettersmonthly.com [Source type: General]

    .
    • The New York Journal-American (8 Dec 1960)
  • My manners, abominable at times, can be sweet.^ Visions of Gerard [1963] Jack Kerouac.
    • Critical Thinkers :: Jack Kerouac Resources 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.synaptic.bc.ca [Source type: General]

    ^ My manners, abominable at times, can be sweet.

    ^ Visions of Gerard (1963) My manners, abominable at times, can be sweet.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .As I grew older I became a drunk.^ As I grew older I became a drunk.

    ^ I was the loneliest man in Paris if that`s possible.` Now all his horizons were inner vistas of self-doubt and despair: As I grew older I became a drunk.
    • Subterranean Homesick Jack - a knol by Peter Daltrey 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

    Why? .Because I like ecstasy of the mind.^ Because I like ecstasy of the mind.

    ^ Because I like ecstasy of the mind.""
    • Quotes by Jack Kerouac (page 1 of 6) 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    I'm a wretch. But I love, love.
    • Satori in Paris (1966)
.
The house stood, and other men lived in it and were sheltered well in it...
  • You can't fight City Hall.^ "You can't fight City Hall.
    • Jack Kerouac - Biography 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.imdb.com [Source type: General]

    ^ After a few months living and fighting with Neal in San Francisco, Jack moved in with William Borroughs in Mexico City.
    • Subterranean Homesick Jack - a knol by Peter Daltrey 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Then, when you were done with the argument, would take the other side, as if you hadn't really presented your case well.
    • Jazz/Jerry Jazz Musician/David Amram discusses Jack Kerouac in an exclusive interview with Jerry Jazz Musician 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.jerryjazzmusician.com [Source type: General]

    It keeps changing its name.
    • "After Me, The Deluge" in The Chicago Tribune (28 September 1969)
  • All our best men are laughed at in this nightmare land.
    • Pomes All Sizes (1992)
.
The only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones that never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars and in the middle you see the blue centerlight pop and everybody goes "Awww!"
  • As early pioneers in the knowing, that when you lose your reason, you attain highest perfect knowing.^ But then they danced down the street like dingledodies, and I shambled after as I've been doing all my life after people who interest me, because the only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn, like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars and in the middle you see the blue centerlight pop and everybody goes "Awww!"
    • Kerouac, Jack quote - But then they danced down the street like dingledodies, and I shambled... 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC quotationsbook.com [Source type: General]

    ^ They danced down the streets like dingledodies, and I shambled after as I've been doing all my life after people who interest me, because the only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars and in the middle you see the blue centerlight pop and everybody goes "Awww!"
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You know the ones.
    • My Dinner with Jack Kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC themurkyfringe.com [Source type: General]

    .
    • Book of Blues (1995)
  • So long and take it easy, because if you start taking things seriously, it is the end of you.^ Book of Blues [1995] Jack Kerouac.
    • Critical Thinkers :: Jack Kerouac Resources 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.synaptic.bc.ca [Source type: General]

    ^ Book of Blues (1995) So long and take it easy, because if you start taking things seriously, it is the end of you.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ So, if that's not too long, and you keep my address a secret, write and tell me the date you want to come: I'm sure we can get the whole thing done in one afternoon.
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    .
    • Atop an Underwood: Early Stories and Other Writings (1999)
  • All human beings are also dream beings.^ Atop an Underwood: Early Stories and Other Writings (1999) All human beings are also dream beings.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All human beings are also dream beings.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Early stories and other writings by the King of the Beats.

    .Dreaming ties all mankind together.
    • Book of Dreams (2001)
  • The tree looks like a dog, barking at heaven.^ Book of Dreams (2001) The tree looks like a dog, barking at heaven.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It's all like a dream.
    • Quotes by Jack Kerouac (page 1 of 6) 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Book of Dreams more books like this .
    • Jack Kerouac Books (Used, New, Out-of-Print) - Alibris 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.alibris.com [Source type: General]

    • Book of Haikus (2003)

The Town and the City (1950)

.
  • He saw that all the struggles of life were incessant, laborious, painful, that nothing was done quickly, without labor, that it had to undergo a thousand fondlings, revisings, moldings, addings, removings, graftings, tearings, correctings, smoothings, rebuildings, reconsiderings, nailings, tackings, chippings, hammerings, hoistings, connectings — all the poor fumbling uncertain incompletions of human endeavor. They went on forever and were forever incomplete, far from perfect, refined, or smooth, full of terrible memories of failure and fears of failure, yet, in the way of things, somehow noble, complete, and shining in the end.^ Jack Kerouac ( Windblown World: The Journals of Jack Kerouac 1947-1954 ) 28 people liked it "he saw that all the struggles of life were incessant, laborious, painful, that nothing was done quickly, without labor, that it had to undergo a thousand fondlings, revisings, moldings, addings, removings, graftings, tearings, correctings, smoothings, rebuildings, reconsiderings, nailings, tackings, chippings, hammerings, hoistings, connectings — all the poor fumbling uncertain incompletions of human endeavor.
    • Quotes by Jack Kerouac (page 1 of 6) 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ It's just the way he saw things.
    • Misremembering Jack Kerouac | Books | guardian.co.uk 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.guardian.co.uk [Source type: General]

    ^ He saw that all the struggles of life were incessant, laborious, painful, that nothing was done quickly, without labor, that it had to undergo a thousand fondlings, revisings, moldings, addings, removings, graftings, tearings, correctings, smoothings, rebuildings, reconsiderings, nailings, tackings, chippings, hammerings, hoistings, connectings — all the poor fumbling uncertain incompletions of human endeavor.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    This he could sense even from the old house they lived in, with its solidly built walls and floors that held together like rock: some man, possibly an angry pessimistic man, had built the house long ago, but the house stood, and his anger and pessimism and irritable labourious sweats were forgotten; the house stood, and other men lived in it and were sheltered well in it.

On the Road (1957)

These are a few samples from this work, for more see the page for On the Road
.
Whither goest thou, America, in thy shiny car in the night?
  • They danced down the streets like dingledodies, and I shambled after as I've been doing all my life after people who interest me, because the only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars and in the middle you see the blue centerlight pop and everybody goes "Awww!"
    • Part One, Ch.^ It changed my life like it changed everyone else's.
      • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Pomes All Sizes (1992) The only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones that never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars and in the middle you see the blue centerlight pop and everybody goes "Awww!"
      • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Jack Kerouac, Dharma Bums "The only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars..."
      • MySpace - Jack Kerouac - 87 - Male - LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS - myspace.com/jack_kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.myspace.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      .1
  • Whither goest thou, America, in thy shiny car in the night?^ These are a few samples from this work, for more see the page for On the Road Whither goest thou, America, in thy shiny car in the night?
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I mean, man, whither goest thou?
    • Jack Kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.univie.ac.at [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Whither goest thou, America, in thy shiny car in the night?
    • Jack Kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.univie.ac.at [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Part Two, Ch.^ Part Two, Ch.
      • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      3
.
I had nothing to offer anybody except my own confusion.
  • The one thing that we yearn for in our living days, that makes us sigh and groan and undergo sweet nauseas of all kinds, is the remembrance of some lost bliss that was probably experienced in the womb and can only be reproduced (though we hate to admit it) in death.^ And means one thing: Nothing-Ever-Happened.

    ^ I had nothing to offer anybody except my own confusion."
    • Quotes by Jack Kerouac (page 1 of 6) 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ It is all one vast awakened thing.
    • Quotes by Jack Kerouac (page 1 of 6) 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .
    • Part Two, Ch.^ Part Two, Ch.
      • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .4
  • I like too many things and get all confused and hung-up running from one falling star to another till I drop.^ We were all inspired by one another.
    • Jack Kerouac and David Amram 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.davidamram.com [Source type: General]

    ^ It was all like one-one-one-one-one-one-one to infinity.
    • http://www.writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88v/kerouac-per-coolidge.html 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.writing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I like too many things and get all confused and hung-up running from one falling star to another till I drop.

    .This is the night, what it does to you.^ This is the night, what It does to you.

    ^ This is the night, what it does to you.
    • Jack Kerouac at Kerouac Alley 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.kerouacalley.com [Source type: General]
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]
    • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

    .I had nothing to offer anybody except my own confusion.
    • Part Two, Ch.^ I had nothing to offer anybody except my own confusion.

      ^ I had nothing to offer anybody but my own confusion".

      ^ In the year of my own birth, 1946, the two men met and nothing was ever the same again.
      • Subterranean Homesick Jack - a knol by Peter Daltrey 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

      4
What's heaven? What's earth? .All in the mind.
  • The car was swaying as Dean and I both swayed to the rhythm and the IT of our final excited joy in talking and living to the blank tranced end of all innumerable riotous angelic particulars that had been lurking in our souls all our lives.^ The car was swaying as Dean and I both swayed to the rhythm and the IT of our final excited joy in talking and living to the blank tranced end of all innumerable riotous angelic particulars that had been lurking in our souls all our lives.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "The car was swaying as Dean and I both swayed to the rythm and the IT of our final excited joy in talking and living to the blank tranced end of all innumerable riotous angelic particulars that had been lurking in our souls all our lives."

    ^ Or have we all be corralled into our homes, discouraged from embarking on roaming adventures, turned on to comfort and technological luxuries, and told to live quietly and obediently?
    • Jack Kerouac | Refractor Blog 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC supraterranean.com [Source type: General]

    .
    • Part Three, Ch.^ Part Three, Ch.
      • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .5
  • What difference does it make after all?^ What difference does it make after all?
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Or, he could be talking about many different butterflies, flying all at once, their wings making the stained-glasslike appearance.
    • Klein on Kerouac's Haiku 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC old.millikin.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He had to make up ways of doing what he heard Jo doing, so when he finally did get to see Jo Jones play he realized he was doing it all differently.
    • http://www.writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88v/kerouac-per-coolidge.html 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.writing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    — anonymity in the world of men is better than fame in heaven, for what's heaven? what's earth? .All in the mind.
    • Part Three, Ch.^ Part Three, Ch.
      • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

      .11
  • So in America when the sun goes down and I sit on the old broken-down river pier watching the long, long skies over New Jersey and sense all that raw land that rolls in one unbelievable huge bulge over to the West Coast, and all that road going, all the people dreaming in the immensity of it, and in Iowa I know by now the children must be crying in the land where they let the children cry, and tonight the stars'll be out, and don't you know that God is Pooh Bear?^ Iowa I know by now the children must be crying in the land where they let the children cry, and tonight the stars'll be out, and don't you know that God is Pooh Bear?"

    ^ You know the ones.
    • My Dinner with Jack Kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC themurkyfringe.com [Source type: General]

    ^ And I will die, and you will die, and we all will die, and even the stars will fade out one after another in time.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    the evening star must be drooping and shedding her sparkler dims on the prairie, which is just before the coming of complete night that blesses the earth, darkens all rivers, cups the peaks and folds the final shore in, and nobody, nobody knows what's going to happen to anybody besides the forlorn rags of growing old, I think of Dean Moriarty, I even think of Old Dean Moriarty the father we never found, I think of Dean Moriarty, I think of Dean Moriarty.
    • Part Five

The Dharma Bums (1958)

Now you understand the Oriental passion for tea...
.
I felt like lying down by the side of the trail and remembering it all.
^ I felt like lying down by the side of the trail and remembering it all.

^ All these cops were following me around like hound dogs on the scent of David Janssen (TV’s former “fugitive,” for those of you too young to remember).

^ I remember some nights talking with him where we felt like it's absolutely up there somewhere and it's not paint and it's not words.
  • http://www.writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88v/kerouac-per-coolidge.html 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.writing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

.The woods do that to you...
  • "Now you understand the Oriental passion for tea," said Japhy.^ "Now you understand the Oriental passion for tea," said Japhy.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Now you understand the Oriental passion for tea...
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It's a spontaneous flow that comes, and nobody could understand what I was talking about when I said you should just open up and let it come out.
    • Jack Foley. Beat Haiku - Terebess Asia Online (TAO) 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.terebess.hu [Source type: Original source]

    ."Remember that book I told you about; the first sip is joy, the second is gladness, the third is serenity, the fourth is madness, the fifth is ecstasy."
  • Pretty girls make graves.
  • Colleges being nothing but grooming schools for the middleclass non-identity which usually finds its perfect expression on the outskirts of the campus in rows of well-to-do houses with lawns and television sets in each living room with everybody looking at the same thing and thinking the same thing at the same time while the Japhies of the world go prowling in the wilderness...
  • I felt like lying down by the side of the trail and remembering it all. The woods do that to you, they always look familiar, long lost, like the face of a long-dead relative, like an old dream, like a piece of forgotten song drifting across the water, most of all like golden eternities of past childhood or past manhood and all the living and the dying and the heartbreak that went on a million years ago and the clouds as they pass overhead seem to testify (by their own lonesome familiarity) to this feeling.^ Scripture of the Golden Eternity more books like this .
    • Jack Kerouac Books (Used, New, Out-of-Print) - Alibris 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.alibris.com [Source type: General]

    ^ I'm a fan like all of you.
    • MySpace - Jack Kerouac - 87 - Male - LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS - myspace.com/jack_kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.myspace.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ But like you said, he always paid the bills first...
    • Beat America by Aram Saroyan : The Poetry Foundation [article] 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryfoundation.org [Source type: General]

    .Ecstacy, even, I felt, with flashes of sudden remembrance, and feeling sweaty and drowsy I felt like sleeping and dreaming in the grass.
  • Sociability is just a big smile, and a big smile is nothing but teeth.
  • I saw that my life was a vast glowing empty page and I could do anything I wanted.
  • Trouble with you is you don't do plenty night zazen especially when it's cold out, that's best, besides you should get married and have halfbreed babies, manuscripts, homespun blankets and mother's milk on your happy ragged mat floor like this one.^ It changed my life like it changed everyone else's.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Sociability is just a big smile, and a big smile is nothing but teeth."

    ^ Trouble with you is you don't do plenty night zazen especially when it's cold out, that's best, besides you should get married and have halfbreed babies, manuscripts, homespun blankets and mother's milk on your happy ragged mat floor like this one.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Get yourself a hut house not too far from town, live cheap, go ball in the bars once in awhile, write and rumble in the hills and learn how to saw boards and talk to grandmas you damn fool, carry loads of wood for them, clap your hands at shrines, get supernatural favors, take flower-arrangement lessons and grow chrysanthemums by the door, and get married for krissakes, get a friendly smart sensitive human-being gal who don't give a shit for martinis every night and all that dumb white shit in the kitchen.^ He could type faster than any human being you ever saw.
    • http://www.writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88v/kerouac-per-coolidge.html 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.writing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All human beings are also dream beings.
    • Jack Kerouac at Kerouac Alley 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.kerouacalley.com [Source type: General]
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Get yourself a hut house not too far from town, live cheap, go ball in the bars once in awhile, write and rumble in the hills and learn how to saw boards and talk to grandmas you damn fool, carry loads of wood for them, clap your hands at shrines, get supernatural favors, take flower-arrangement lessons and grow chrysanthemums by the door, and get married for krissakes, get a friendly smart sensitive human-being gal who don't give a shit for martinis every night and all that dumb white shit in the kitchen.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    If you have ice cream I will give you some.
    If you have no ice cream I will take it away from you.
    (It is an ice cream kōan [cone].)
Compare “For unto every one that hath shall be given, and he shall have abundance: but from him that hath not shall be taken away even that which he hath.” Matthew 25:29, King James Version

Lonesome Traveler (1960)

  • No man should go through life without once experiencing healthy, even bored solitude in the wilderness, finding himself depending solely on himself and thereby learning his true and hidden strength. Learning for instance, to eat when he's hungry and sleep when he's sleepy.

Big Sur (1962)

Ah, life is a gate, a way, a path to Paradise anyway, why not live for fun and joy and love...
  • Ah, life is a gate, a way, a path to Paradise anyway, why not live for fun and joy and love or some sort of girl by a fireside, why not go to your desire and LAUGH...
  • Everything is the same, the fog says 'We are fog and we fly by dissolving like ephemera,' and the leaves say 'We are leaves and we jiggle in the wind, that's all, we come and go, grow and fall' — Even the paper bags in my garbage pit say 'We are mantransformed paper bags made out of wood pulp, we are kinda proud of being paper bags as long as that will be possible, but we'll be mush again with our sisters the leaves come rainy season' — The tree stumps say 'We are tree stumps torn out of the ground by men, sometimes by the wind, we have big tendrils full of earth that drink out of the earth' — Men say 'We are men, we pull out tree stumps, we make paper bags, we think wise thoughts, we make lunch, we look around, we make a great effort to realise everything is the same.'
  • I feel guilty for being a member of the human race.

Desolation Angels (1965)

I will die, and you will die, and we all will die, and even the stars will fade out one after another in time.
  • And I will die, and you will die, and we all will die, and even the stars will fade out one after another in time.
  • But O Sarina come with me to my bed of woes, let me love you gently in the night, long time, we got all night, till dawn, till Juliet's rising sun and Romeo's vial sink, till I have slaked my thirst of Samsara at your portal rosy petal lips and left saviour juice in your rosy flesh garden to melt and dry and ululate another baby for the void, come sweet Sarina in my naughty arms, be dirty in my clean milk, and I'll detest the defecate I leave in your milky empowered cyst-and-vulva chamber, your cloacan clara file-hool through which slowly drool the hall-gyzm, to castles in your hassel flesh and I'll protect you trembling thighs against my heart and kiss your lips and cheeks and Lair and love you everywhere and that'll be that...
There's your Karma ripe as peaches.
  • I could give you a list a mile long of the homosexuals in the arts but there's no point in making a big tzimis about a relatively harmless and cool state of affairs — Each man to his own tastes.
  • Everything is going to the beat — It's the beat generation, it be-at, it's the beat to keep, it's the beat of the heart, it's being beat and down in the world and like oldtime lowdown and like in ancient civilizations the slave boatmen rowing galleys to a beat and servants spinning pottery to a beat...
  • There's your Karma ripe as peaches.

Visions of Cody (1960)

.
I accept lostness forever.
  • It no longer makes me cry and die and tear myself to see her go because everything goes away from me like that now — girls, visions, anything, just in the same way and forever and I accept lostness forever.
  • I'm writing this book because we're all going to die — In the loneliness of my life, my father dead, my brother dead, my mother far away, my sister and my wife far away, nothing here but my own tragic hands that once were guarded by a world, a sweet attention, that now are left to guide and disappear their own way into the common dark of all our death, sleeping in me raw bed, alone and stupid...
  • The mad road, lonely, leading around the bend into the openings of space towards the horizon Wasatch snows promised us in the vision of the West, spine heights at the world's end, coast of blue Pacific starry night — nobone halfbanana moons sloping in the tangled night sky, the torments of great formations in mist, the huddled invisible insect in the car racing onwards, illuminate.^ "Then suddenly everything was just like jazz," Kerouac writes.
    • roamin' legions - bookforum.com / in print 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.bookforum.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Visions of Cody more books like this .
    • Jack Kerouac Books (Used, New, Out-of-Print) - Alibris 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.alibris.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Visions of Gerard more books like this .
    • Jack Kerouac Books (Used, New, Out-of-Print) - Alibris 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.alibris.com [Source type: General]

    — The raw cut, the drag, the butte, the star, the draw, the sunflower in the grass — orangebutted west lands of Arcadia, forlorn sands of the isolate earth, dewy exposures to infinity in black space, home of the rattlesnake and the gopher the level of the world, low and flat: the charging restless mute unvoiced road keening in a seizure of tarpaulin power into the route.

Some of the Dharma (1997)

.
My witness is the empty sky.
  • A man who allows wild passion to arise within, himself burns his heart, then after burning adds the wind that thereto which ignites the fire again, or not, as the case may be.
  • Literature is no longer Necessary Teaching is left.
  • Mankind is like dogs, not gods — as long as you don't get mad they'll bite you — but stay mad and you'll never be bitten.^ Jack Kerouac Mankind is like dogs, not gods as long as you don't get mad they'll bite you but stay mad and you'll never be bitten.
    • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

    ^ A man who allows wild passion to arise within, himself burns his heart, then after burning adds the wind that thereto which ignites the fire again, or not, as the case may be.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Literature is no longer Necessary Teaching is left.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    Dogs don't respect humility and sorrow.
  • My witness is the empty sky.

Unsourced

  • Great things are not accomplished by those who yield to trends and fads and popular opinion.
  • If moderation is a fault, then indifference is a crime.

Misattributed

.
  • Here's to the crazy ones.^ Here's to the crazy ones.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. .The round pegs in the square holes.^ The round pegs in the square holes.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .The ones who see things differently.^ So people see one thing in me.
    • Explore World Hum - Tag: Jack Kerouac - World Hum 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.worldhum.com [Source type: News]

    ^ The ones who see things differently.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Those who know me well can see me striking through my main literary inspirations, and the only one left is Henry Miller.
    • Jack Kerouac | Refractor Blog 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC supraterranean.com [Source type: General]

    .They're not fond of rules, and they have no respect for the status quo.^ They're not fond of rules, and they have no respect for the status quo.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They set up some rules that seem like “no rules” since they violate the received traditions.

    .You can quote them; disagree with them; glorify or vilify them.^ You can quote them; disagree with them; glorify or vilify them.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .About the only thing you can't do is ignore them.^ About the only thing you can't do is ignore them.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You only go on to the next work after you've put everything in it that you can, I mean, dig that as a statement about composition.
    • http://www.writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88v/kerouac-per-coolidge.html 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.writing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ You can argue about whether it's enough or not, and we can all look forward to the day it's no longer an issue, but let's not ignore that it's better than before.
    • Race Still Matters - Sparking - Open Salon 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC open.salon.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Because they change things.^ Because they change things.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They tell me to go to the Mogan Cultural Center, because “They know all of that.” I feel that it must be a good thing in life to “know all of that,” so I head to the Mogan Cultural Center for enlightenment.
    • Daytripping in Jack Kerouac's Lowell 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC serendipityjones.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world are the ones who do.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .They push the human race forward.^ They push the human race forward.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .And while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius.^ And while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Unfortunately, your home computer may cause some glitches that effect how you see our Site -- and that is beyond our control.
    • Johnny Depp - Jack Kerouac | SPIKE 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.spike.com [Source type: General]

    .Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world are the ones who do.^ Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world are the ones who do.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Because they change things.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But the sadness is not sentimentality, because many of the people in the book who inhabit that world would be happy to see it go or else are too drunk or forlorn to care.
    • Drive, He Wrote : The New Yorker 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.newyorker.com [Source type: General]

    • Used in the Apple "Think Different" marketing campaign and sometimes attributed to Kerouac, perhaps because it evokes his famous quote from On the Road: "The only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn, like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars and in the middle you see the blue centerlight pop and everybody goes "Awww!"

Quotes about Kerouac

.
  • I consider On The Road sort of holy because it helped change my life as it did to so many others and as it continues to do so.^ I consider On The Road sort of holy because it helped change my life as it did to so many others and as it continues to do so.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It changed my life like it changed everyone else's.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This pure reading changed my life.
    • Beat America by Aram Saroyan : The Poetry Foundation [article] 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryfoundation.org [Source type: General]

    .Jack wanted his papers enshrined in a library but they are now in the hands of highly non-literary people more interested in their monetary value than in their literary or cultural value.^ Jack wanted his papers enshrined in a library but they are now in the hands of highly non-literary people more interested in their monetary value than in their literary or cultural value.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ No wonder, it's valued at more than $10-million now.
    • Tampabay: The fight over all things Kerouac 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.sptimes.com [Source type: News]

    ^ You are a non-conformist and have an original approach to life that lets you get more out of it than more cautious people.

    .
  • Caringosity killed the Kerouac cat.^ Al Aronowitz in an interview in The 3rd Page : Journal of Ongrowing Natures (15 May 2005) Caringosity killed the Kerouac cat.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Scripture’s small 38-page text is divided into 66 scriptures, which Kerouac managed to fill with doublespeak logic that seems to have come quite naturally to him.
    • thezensite: An Exploration of Jack Kerouac's Buddhism 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.thezensite.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The Town and the City, composed in 1946-48 and published in 1950, may be a derivative apprentice work but it showed that Kerouac's natural bent was for long prose narrative.
    • Swans Commentary: Jack Kerouac In The Heel Of Italy, by Peter Byrne - pbyrne18 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.swans.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
  • I read On the Road in maybe 1959. It changed my life like it changed everyone else's.^ It changed my life like it changed everyone else's.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I read On the Road in maybe 1959, Bob Dylan said.
    • On the road with Jack Kerouac - Google Earth Community 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC bbs.keyhole.com [Source type: General]

    ^ It changed my life like it changed everyone elses.
    • On the road with Jack Kerouac - Google Earth Community 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC bbs.keyhole.com [Source type: General]

  • Someone handed me Mexico City Blues in St. Paul [Minnesota] in 1959 and it blew my mind. .It was the first poetry that spoke my own language.^ It was the first poetry that spoke my own language.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ So I’m first trying to get back on my regular schedule of heavy reading, and hopefully the writing will flow on its own.
    • Jack Kerouac | Refractor Blog 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC supraterranean.com [Source type: General]

  • Once when Kerouac was high on psychedelics with Timothy Leary, he looked out the window and said, "Walking on water wasn't built in a day." Our goal was to save the planet and alter human consciousness. .That will take a long time, if it happens at all.^ That will take a long time, if it happens at all.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "He thinks I'm competitive in a long pleasant souse of Wishing all of ye bleed stay meditation everybody martini destroy my black " Something that also happens ...
    • http://www.writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88v/kerouac-per-coolidge.html 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.writing.upenn.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ All the time I've been here I haven't had any girl but Inez -- this only happens to me in New York!

    .
  • You don't know what I'm all about
    Like killing cops and reading Kerouac
  • If you're working with words, it's got to be poetry.^ You all know the story.
    • Gerald's Blog - Jack Kerouac, Typist 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.geraldhausman.com [Source type: General]

    ^ For in the end, the Kerouac obsession is not about novels or poetry at all.
    • Jack Boulware » Archive » The Kerouac Obsession 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.jackboulware.com [Source type: General]

    ^ I don't like all the smoke and mirrors.
    • Race Still Matters - Sparking - Open Salon 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC open.salon.com [Source type: Original source]

    .I grew up with Kerouac.^ I grew up with Kerouac.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ John Sampas, the youngest of 10 children, grew up in Lowell, which was also Jack Kerouac’s hometown.
    • Jack Boulware » Archive » The Kerouac Obsession 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.jackboulware.com [Source type: General]

    ^ That's not the Jack buried beneath the flat headstone in the cemetery just outside the town of Lowell , about 30 miles outside of Boston, where Kerouac grew up.
    • Misremembering Jack Kerouac | Books | guardian.co.uk 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.guardian.co.uk [Source type: General]

    .If he hadn't wrote On The Road, the Doors would have never existed.^ If Jack hadn't been famous he never would have had to describe what he had been doing in On the Road .
    • Poetry Flash:"A Life in Letters: Ann Charters on Jack Kerouac"#288; 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.poetryflash.org [Source type: General]

    ^ If he hadn't wrote On The Road , the Doors would have never existed.

    ^ They are indeed far from any sort of classical haiku--yet without haiku Broughton's poems would never have existed.
    • Jack Foley. Beat Haiku - Terebess Asia Online (TAO) 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.terebess.hu [Source type: Original source]

    .Morrison read On The Road down in Florida, and I read it in Chicago.^ We’d both prepared for the trip by re-reading “On the Road,” and peppered each other with questions and theories about the beatnik era and attitude during the entire drive down.
    • Happy Birthday, Jack Kerouac | Bob Wire | Columbia Gorge | New West Columbia Gorge 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.newwest.net [Source type: General]

    ^ Irsay, 41, said he was honored to acquire the manuscript of "On The Road,'' which he first read as a teen-ager in Chicago.
    • Buffy and Roswell, Jack Kerouac, Brain Shrinkage, Global Warming! 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC richlabonte.net [Source type: News]

    ^ Morrison read On The Road down in Florida, and I read it in Chicago.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    .That sense of freedom, spirituality, and intellectuality in On The Road — that's what I wanted in my own work.^ That sense of freedom, spirituality, and intellectuality in On The Road that's what I wanted in my own work."

    ^ That sense of freedom, spirituality, and intellectuality in On The Road — that's what I wanted in my own work.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He wanted time to work, but found that success robbed him of his freedom.
    • Jack Kerouac and David Amram 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.davidamram.com [Source type: General]

    .
  • The world that [Kerouac] trembling stepped out into in that decade was a bitter, gray one.^ Ray Manzarek , The Doors ' keyboard player .

    ^ Ray Manzarek , The Doors ' keyboard player The world that [Kerouac] trembling stepped out into in that decade was a bitter, gray one.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ DA   In Kerouac's case, after one book came out, On the Road , he was hailed as the greatest new novelist since Thomas Wolfe.
    • Jazz/Jerry Jazz Musician/David Amram discusses Jack Kerouac in an exclusive interview with Jerry Jazz Musician 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.jerryjazzmusician.com [Source type: General]

    .
  • Kerouac was "locked in the Cold War and the first Asian debacle" in "the gray, chill, militaristic silence, [...] the intellective void [...] the spiritual drabness.^ The trail led from San Francisco to Kerouac’s hometown of Lowell, Massachusetts.
    • Jack Boulware » Archive » The Kerouac Obsession 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.jackboulware.com [Source type: General]

    ^ LAWRENCE FERLINGHETTI: Well, Rexroth was the leading elder poet in San Francisco in the 1950s when I arrived, and he had a program on KPFA. And he didn’t review just literature.
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    ^ In 1953, Ferlinghetti co-founded City Lights Bookstore in San Francisco, the first all-paperbound bookshop in the country.
    • Legendary Beat Generation Bookseller and Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti of City Lights Books on the 50th Anniversary of Jack Kerouac’s “On The Road”, Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl” and Poetry As Insurgent Art 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.democracynow.org [Source type: General]

    .
  • Kerouac opened a million coffee bars and sold a million pairs of Levis to both sexes.^ Michael McClure , San Francisco poet Kerouac opened a million coffee bars and sold a million pairs of Levis to both sexes.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Later that year Ginsberg introduced Kerouac to the jazz poets of San Francisco, Philip Lamantia, Michael McClure, Philip Whalen and Lawrence Ferlinghetti who ran the City Lights book store and press.
    • Subterranean Homesick Jack - a knol by Peter Daltrey 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Published in 1956 , at the leading edge of the San Francisco Poetry Renaissance , he used his early publicity and influence to help push forward the careers of many other young writers and poets, Kerouac included.
    • Jack Kerouac character reference key@Everything2.com 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: General]

    Woodstock rises from his pages. .
  • That's not writing, it's typing.^ William S. Burroughs That's not writing, it's typing.
    • Jack Kerouac - Wikiquote 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC en.wikiquote.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Kerouac fled to Tangier where he lived in a room above William Burroughs who was writing `Naked Lunch.` But Jack stayed for just seven weeks.
    • Subterranean Homesick Jack - a knol by Peter Daltrey 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

    .
  • We will write a postcard To our friends and family In free verse On the road with Kerouac Sheltered in his Bivouac On this road we'll never die...^ While Beat poet Allen Ginsberg praised it as "a magnificent single paragraph, several blocks long, rolling, like the road itself,'' author Truman Capote disparaged it as "typing, not writing.''
    • Buffy and Roswell, Jack Kerouac, Brain Shrinkage, Global Warming! 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC richlabonte.net [Source type: News]

    ^ Jack Kerouac Mankind is like dogs, not gods as long as you don't get mad they'll bite you but stay mad and you'll never be bitten.
    • *�*  Wilson's Almanac free daily ezine | Book of Days | March 12 |Martyrdom of Hypatia Marduk Moshoeshoe Jack Kerouac Bishop George BerkeleyO'Farrell Clontarf 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.wilsonsalmanac.com [Source type: General]

    ^ On the Road chronicles Jack Kerouac's years traveling the North American continent with his friend Neal Cassady, "a sideburned hero of the snowy West."

    .
  • Did the tea-time of your soul/Make you long for wilder days/Did you never let Jack Kerouac/Wash over you in waves?^ What would Jack Kerouac make of all this?
    • Jack Boulware » Archive » The Kerouac Obsession 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.jackboulware.com [Source type: General]

    ^ How would you characterize your friendship with Jack Kerouac?
    • Jazz/Jerry Jazz Musician/David Amram discusses Jack Kerouac in an exclusive interview with Jerry Jazz Musician 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.jerryjazzmusician.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Did you ever talk to Kerouac when he was here?
    • In Search of Jack Kerouac -- A. E. Sadler -- Eclectica Magazine v2n3 17 January 2010 0:50 UTC www.eclectica.org [Source type: Original source]

External links

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about:

Simple English

Jean-Louis Lebris de Kerouac (born March 12, 1922 – died October 21, 1969), better known as Jack Kerouac, was an American author and poet. He was part of the Beat Generation movement of writers and artists of the 1950s and 1960s, and gave the movement its name. His most famous work was a long novel titled On the Road, which was published in 1957.

Kerouac was a friend of writers Allen Ginsberg, William S. Burroughs, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, and Gregory Corso, among many others. Nearly all of Kerouac's writings were directly based on his own life, but he mostly changed names and details, to protect everyone's privacy. The man he wrote about most was his friend Neal Cassady, who was called "Dean Moriarty" in On the Road. Kerouac influenced many other writers and poets who came along later, and also many musicians of the 1960s, through his works. He also changed the way Americans saw themselves, and their country.

Contents

Early life

Kerouac was born in Lowell, Massachusetts to French-Canadian parents (named Leo and Gabrielle), and was the youngest of three children. He spoke only French until he started school. His family was Roman Catholic. His father was a printer, and Kerouac became interested in printed works. He liked to make his own handwritten newspapers and books. He enjoyed reading, and imitated the styles of writers he liked, such as Thomas Wolfe. He became an expert typist, and could type faster than 100 words per minute.

Kerouac was a good athlete, and went to Columbia University in New York on a football scholarship, but an injury during a practice game ended his football career. He dropped out of Columbia, and devoted himself to writing stories and plays. He met Allen Ginsberg at college. Their circle of friends included many future writers and artists, like William S. Burroughs, and Herbert Huncke.

During World War II, Kerouac served in the Merchant Marine, which made him a veteran of the American military. He kept journals of his experiences, and he used them later to write other works. He was also able to get veteran's benefits later, such as medical help when he was sick with phlebitis, and grant money to pay his bills while he wrote. Kerouac was proud to be an American, and always said good things about his country.

Kerouac's father died of stomach cancer in 1946. He made Kerouac promise to always work to support his mother. He tried to talk Kerouac out of becoming a writer, because he knew it was hard to succeed in such a career. Kerouac had a hard time staying with any other kind of work, though. He would become impatient or restless, or a disagreement with someone at work would turn into trouble. Kerouac did his best to earn enough money to pay for both his and his mother's living, but his mother also had to work. She was a nurse. She worked in a factory when there were no nursing jobs.

Early career

Kerouac published a few short stories and reviews in New York magazines and newspapers in the 1940s. He worked briefly for his hometown newspaper, The Lowell Sun. His first novel, The Town and the City, was published in 1950. For his second novel, Kerouac wanted to write a book about cross-country road trips and hitchhiking. Hitchhiking was safer to do in the 1940s, in America, than it is today. Kerouac stopped and restarted writing this book several times. Kerouac did not want to just tell an ordinary story. He wanted to give an idea of how the people he met thought things through, and expressed this to each other, along with telling what they did and said. He also knew he needed more experiences, to tell a better story.

Many experiences came through Kerouac's friendship with Neal Cassady. Cassady was a handsome, bright young drifter with a teenaged wife, named Luanne Henderson. Cassady and Luanne had a hard relationship, and broke up and got back together many times. He later married another woman named Carolyn Robinson, who was older than Luanne and understood him better, but Carolyn and Cassady also had troubles. Kerouac was briefly married, to girlfriend Edie Parker. They did not stay together long, and were soon divorced. Cassady taught Kerouac, who never had a driver's license, how to drive, while Kerouac taught Cassady about writing.


Neal Cassady traveled back and forth across the country, usually driving cars like Hudsons at high speed. He looked for jobs, fresh experiences, and new friends. Kerouac began to travel with him. They lived in and visited cities such as Denver, San Francisco, Monterey, and even Mexico City. They also looked sometimes for Cassady's father, who disappeared years earlier. Kerouac got sick in Mexico City, and Cassady left him behind at the hospital. Kerouac had to make his own way home. He took this very hard, and was angry with Cassady. He forgave him later, when they met again, and he made Cassady the central character of his new book. One job Kerouac could fall back on, thanks to Cassady, was as a railroad brakeman.


Many people in the 1940s and 1950s used stimulant drugs such as benzedrine, to help them stay alert. Jazz music was also popular, and some jazz musicians and listeners smoked marijuana. Kerouac was influenced by both drugs, and they changed the way he wrote. He began to write what he called "spontaneous prose", jotting down words in much the same way a musician improvises a solo in a song. (Kerouac played no musical instruments, but could scat sing well, and had many of the same instincts as a musician.) His new writing style was strange to many people, and even seen as bad by some older authors and critics. It was six years before Kerouac published his second novel.


The version of On the Road that finally satisfied Kerouac was written over three weeks in 1951. It was typed on a single roll of teletype paper. Kerouac liked to type on rolls of paper, because he did not have to stop to change pages. He had just gotten married for the second time, to Joan Haverty. The manuscript was Kerouac's way to explain his friendship with Neal Cassady to his new wife. The explanation made a fine rough draft for a novel, but it did not help his marriage. Joan felt that Kerouac's nonstop work on the manuscript was an obsession, and she did not want to stay married to him after it was finished. They were soon divorced, as he was with his first wife.

The editor who worked on The Town and the City found the long, scroll-like manuscript hard to understand, and even harder to work with. Kerouac's publisher rejected the novel, as did every other publisher he went to. Nor was anyone interested in The Subterraneans, a shorter novel he wrote in three nights, about his romance with an African-American woman. Such a relationship was taboo in America during the 1950s. Kerouac continued to write, from short stories and essays to long novels, and even poetry. He tried many different subjects, but had almost nothing published. He also worked different jobs, including brakeman and night watchman.

It turned out that Joan Haverty was pregnant by Kerouac, and she gave birth to a daughter, Jan-Michelle. Kerouac denied he was the father at first, but a blood test later proved it was likely. She also grew to look like him, and he accepted her as his child. Joan sued Kerouac for child support, but he was ill and could not work at the time, and she collected almost no money. Kerouac only saw Jan a few times, but talked to her more often by telephone. Joan mostly kept them apart.

Fame

Allen Ginsberg became well-known during the 1950s for his writings, in particular a poem called "Howl", whose title came from Kerouac's critique of it. Ginsberg mentioned his friends in some of his works, including Kerouac, and wanted the people who liked him to give them and their writings a chance. Finally Viking Press agreed to publish On the Road, after many changes to the manuscript. The novel became a bestseller, and Kerouac was a celebrity after years of little success. Magazines began to request articles and essays from him. He appeared on many television programs, including The Steve Allen Show. Steve Allen liked him, and they recorded an album together, with Kerouac reading aloud and Allen playing piano. He recorded another album later, with jazz musicians Al Cohn and Zoot Sims.

Kerouac wrote and published more novels, including The Dharma Bums, Doctor Sax, Maggie Cassidy, Visions of Gerard (a memoir of his older brother, who died in childhood), Big Sur (about the stresses brought on by fame, and how the people he knew saw him differently), Desolation Angels, and Book of Dreams (a dream journal). He studied Buddhism, and this also influenced his writing. He wrote Some of the Dharma as an introduction to Buddhism, though he remained a Catholic.

As Kerouac, Ginsberg, and their friends became famous, a trend among the group of writers and artists was noticed, and was written about in the mainstream media. Kerouac was asked to describe his generation. He explained that the pressures of 20th century living had 'beaten' normal ways of thinking and working out of them, and they preferred the beat of bebop and jazz to most other music, "so I guess you could say we're a beat generation."

"Beat Generation" became the name for the new sense of style coming from artists and writers in New York and San Francisco. Kerouac's circle of friends and acquaintances (and their imitators) were called the Beats, with Kerouac himself called "King of the Beats" by the media. (The term was later parodied as "beatniks", implying such people were Communists, and would hurt the country.) Kerouac narrated a movie, called Pull My Daisy, about the Beat phenomenon.

An ongoing problem Kerouac had with fame was that people thought he did all the things he wrote about. Much of what he described (like Neal Cassady's lawless nature, promiscuity, and drug use) was only what he saw in other people. Not everyone who read Kerouac's stories understood this. Some people wanted to blame him for doing bad things, or getting others to do them. Other people wanted to do those kinds of things with Kerouac. Shy by nature, Kerouac pulled away. He became almost a recluse in the house he bought for his mother. He also began to abuse alcohol.

Later life and career

During the 1960s, American society went through many changes, in part because of the influence of the Beats. Many young people read On the Road, and saw things they related to, and it made them want to experience more in their own lives. Other writers liked the looseness of Kerouac's style, and it made them think more about their own writing, how to study life, and how to better express themselves. Many musicians were affected by Kerouac's books, including Bob Dylan, Donovan, and The Doors.

Kerouac was more disappointed than happy to be famous. Even though he liked some of what he inspired, he felt that the public largely got the wrong message from his books. He saw many people take what the Beats wrote as a kind of permission to get into trouble, or abandon (give up) people and things they cared about. He felt sympathy for the hippies, but disagreed with them on the Vietnam War, the role of government, and patriotism. He also lost some of his old friends, when their views differed.

Kerouac still abused alcohol and other drugs, and it harmed his health. He became bloated and irritable, and looked drunk on his last television appearance, on William F. Buckley's Firing Line in 1968. He married for the third time, to Stella Sampas, the sister of a boyhood friend. Stella looked after Kerouac and his mother, kept the public and others away, and tried to get him to stop drinking alcohol.

His daughter Jan-Michelle also began to write during her teen years. He gave her his blessing, and told her "You can use my (last) name." She wrote under the name Jan Kerouac, and published novels and stories herself, from the 1970s to the 1990s. Kerouac's mother became sick, and he sometimes worked at her bedside on stories. She helped him work out the ending of Pic, his novel about a young African-American.


Kerouac wrote and reworked new material until the last day of his life. He died during emergency surgery, to try to repair a hemorrhage caused by his alcohol abuse. He was buried in his hometown, and was hardly remembered there at first. Even though he was world famous, Kerouac earned very little money as a writer. He died with only a few hundred dollars in the bank. It was years before his grave received a headstone.

Neal Cassady died more than a year before, of exposure, alongside a railroad track in Mexico. He set out to become a writer or musician, but he never got far with either. He only published one book, The First Third, which was about his youth. Cassady earned most of his money from labor, and was often out of work and owed money. He spent a long time in jail after he was arrested for selling marijuana. Sometimes the fact that Cassady was well-known through Kerouac kept him from having the life he wanted. Cassady had a family with Carolyn, but she had to both work, and raise the children when her husband was away. Carolyn later wrote a memoir.

Legacy

Kerouac's works, especially On the Road, are now more popular than ever. Generations have discovered his works, as a means of learning about life and attitudes in America during his lifetime, as a way to measure their own sense of experience, or as examples of free association and stream of consciousness in creative writing.


Less than half of Kerouac's writings were published during his lifetime, but nearly all are now available. The ones published later drew hundreds of times more money than his most famous works, when they first appeared. His hometown Lowell remembers Kerouac today with a memorial, and cultural events every year. His grave now has a headstone, which reads "He honored life". A street in Lowell was renamed "Jack Kerouac Alley" in his memory.

In other media

The Subterraneans was made into a movie by MGM in 1960, but the storyline was almost completely different from the book. On the Road was considered many times to be made into a movie, once with actor Marlon Brando as Dean Moriarty and another time with Sean Penn, but this never got farther than negotiations. The movie rights were recently resold, for more than ten times Kerouac's lifetime earnings.

A movie, Heart Beat, was made in 1980, about the relationship between Carolyn Robinson, Neal Cassady and Jack Kerouac. It starred Sissy Spacek, Nick Nolte, and John Heard.

Kerouac appears as "Hank" in William S. Burroughs's novel Naked Lunch, and was played by Nicholas Campbell in the 1991 movie version.

He was also the subject of a song by 10,000 Maniacs, "Hey Jack Kerouac".

He and Neal Cassady are the subject of a song by Tom Waits, "Jack & Neal/California Here I Come".

Tom Waits covers a song written by Kerouac called "On the Road". The song appears on Waits' album "Orphans".

Sources

  • Kerouac: A Biography, by Ann Charters (St. Martin's Press)
  • Jack Kerouac, by Tom Clark (Marlowe & Company)


Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 25, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on Jack Kerouac, which are similar to those in the above article.








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