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Jack Peart
Personal information
Full name John George Peart
Date of birth 3 October 1888(1888-10-03)
Place of birth    South Shields, England
Date of death    3 September 1948 (aged 59)
Place of death    Paddington, England
Playing position Centre-forward
Youth career
000000 Adelaide South Shields
Senior career1
Years Club App (Gls)*
1907–1909
1909–1912
1912–1913
1913–1919
000000
000000
000000
1919
1919–1920
1920–1922
1922
1922–1923
1923–1924
Sheffield United
Stoke
Newcastle United
Notts County
Rochdale (guest)
Barnsley (guest)
Leeds City
Birmingham
Derby County
Ebbw Vale Steel & Iron Company
Port Vale
Norwich City
Rochdale
27 0(8)
44 (38)
17 0(6)
82 (51)



03 0(0)
09 0(1)

07 0(0)
21 0(7)
21 (10)   
Teams managed
000000
1923–1930
1930–1935
1935–1948
Ebbw Vale Steel & Iron Company
Rochdale
Bradford City
Fulham

1 Senior club appearances and goals
counted for the domestic league only.
* Appearances (Goals)

John George "Jack" Peart (3 October 1888 – 3 September 1948) was an English footballer who played centre forward for 13 different teams, in a career which spanned the First World War. After he retired he became a football manager until his death in 1948.

Contents

Playing career

Peart was a centre forward who had a nomadic career. He played for eight league clubs in a career which spanned 19 years and every division of the Football League. He also played non-league football in the Southern and Welsh leagues, as well as guested for other clubs during the First World War. Peart was known as the 'most injured man in football', which included a broken leg in 1910 at Sheffield United keeping him out of football for two seasons.[1]

He left Adelaide South Shields to sign with First Division Sheffield United in 1907. Eight goals in 27 league appearances preceded a move to Stoke in the Birmingham & District League two years later. He left the Potteries in 1912 to return to top-flight football with Newcastle United. The next year he dropped down to the with Second Division Notts County. His time at County spanned the Great War, in his six years with the club he scored 51 goals in 82 league appearances. During the war he also guested for Rochdale and Barnsley.

After a time with Leeds City, he joined Birmingham in 1919, before moving on to Derby County later in the year. In 1920 he joined Ebbw Vale Steel & Iron Company as player-manager, though he resigned his post in January 1922, returning to the English Second Division with Port Vale. Injury limited his contribution to the Vale's 1922–23 campaign to just seven appearances and he was released upon its conclusion.[2]

At 34 years old, Peart joined Norwich City in the Third Division South for the 1923–24 season. He was appointed player-manager at Rochdale for the 1924–25 season, retiring as a player at the season's end with a tally of 10 goals in 21 league games.

Management career

Peart spent short periods as player-manager at Ebbw Vale and Rochdale. He left Rochdale in 1924 to become manager of Bradford City. He took over from the club's most successful manager, Peter O'Rourke in July 1930. During his five years at Valley Parade he maintained the club's position in Division Two but he had offered to resign at the end of 1933–34 before agreeing to see out the final two years of his contract.[1]

In 1935, he joined Fulham where he remained until his death in September 1948 at the age of 59. The team he built went on to win the Division Two championship the season after his 13-year reign.

References

  1. ^ a b Frost, Terry (1988). Bradford City A Complete Record 1903–1988. Breedon Books Sport. pp. 67–68. ISBN 0907969380.  
  2. ^ Kent, Jeff (1996). Port Vale Personalities. Witan Books. p. 228. ISBN 0952915200.  

External links

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