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Jackson Pollock
.Photographer Hans Namuth extensively documented Pollock's unique painting techniques.^ Namuth wanted to photograph and film Pollock at work, painting .
  • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

^ An earlier ten-minute documentary Jackson Pollock (1951) was directed by Hans Namuth and had music by Morton Feldman.
  • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

^ Pollock promised to start a new painting especially for the photographic session, but when Namuth arrived, Pollock apologized and told him the painting was finished.
  • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

Birth name Paul Jackson Pollock
Born January 28, 1912(1912-01-28)
Cody, Wyoming, U.S.
Died August 11, 1956 (aged 44)
Springs, New York, U.S.
Nationality American
Field Painter
Training Art Students League of New York
Movement Abstract expressionism
Patrons Peggy Guggenheim
Influenced by Thomas Hart Benton, Pablo Picasso
.Paul Jackson Pollock (January 28, 1912 – August 11, 1956) was an influential American painter and a major figure in the abstract expressionist movement.^ August 15, 1956: Jackson Pollock's funeral is held.
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

^ June 1956: Jackson Pollock rejects label of "Abstract Expressionism."
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

^ Paul Jackson Pollock (January 28, 1912 – August 11, 1956) was an influential American artist and a major force in the abstract expressionism movement.
  • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

During his lifetime, Pollock enjoyed considerable fame and notoriety. He was regarded as a mostly reclusive artist. He had a volatile personality and struggled with alcoholism all of his life. .In 1945, he married the artist Lee Krasner, who became an important influence on his career and on his legacy.^ In 1944 Pollock married his live-in lover of many years, Lee Krasner and in 1945 they moved to The Springs, in the East Hampton area of Long Island.
  • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

^ The exhibition and catalogue will offer a deeply moving reassessment of the artist’s entire career, including his struggles and his triumphs—personal as well as artistic—and the powerful legacy of his work.” .
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

^ According to the curators, Hofmann, while clearly recognized as an important painter, has often been heralded more for his influence as a teacher than as an artist.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

[1]
.Pollock died at the age of 44 in an alcohol-related, single-car crash.^ Pollock's career was cut short when he died in an alcohol-related, single car crash in 1956 at the age of only 44, killing one of his passengers, Edith Metzger.
  • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

.In December 1956, he was given a memorial retrospective exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City, and a larger more comprehensive exhibition there in 1967. More recently, in 1998 and 1999, his work was honored with large-scale retrospective exhibitions at MoMA and at The Tate in London.^ In 1968, he was given a major retrospective at the Guggenheim Museum in New York.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

^ This year his works have been exhibited at the Guggenheim Museum New York as part of the exhibition The Third Mind.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

^ Born Paul Jackson Pollock in Wyoming, he headed to California, but left before finishing high school to study at the Art Students League in New York.
  • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]
  • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]

[2]
.In 2000, Pollock was the subject of an Academy Award–winning film directed by and starring Ed Harris.^ He was the subject of the documentaries Jackson Pollock (1987) and Jackson Pollock - Love & Death on Long Island (1999) as well as a movie drama called Pollock (2000) starring Ed Harris.
  • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

^ Pollock Script - transcript from the screenplay and/or Ed Harris Jackson Pollock movie Pollock Script - Dialogue Transcript .
  • Pollock Script - transcript from the screenplay and/or Ed Harris Jackson Pollock movie 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.script-o-rama.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Contents

Early life

.Pollock was born in Cody, Wyoming in 1912,[3] the youngest of five brothers.^ He was born in Cody, Wyoming, and grew up in Arizona and California, later moving to New York in 1930, following his brother, Charles Pollock , where they both studied under Thomas Hart Benton at the Art Students League.
  • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

^ Born Paul Jackson Pollock in Wyoming, he headed to California, but left before finishing high school to study at the Art Students League in New York.
  • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]
  • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]

^ Born in Codi, WY (US) It was Jackson Pollock who blazed an astonishing trail for the other Abstract Expressionist painters to follow.
  • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]
  • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]

.His parents, Stella May McClure and LeRoy Pollock, grew up in Tingley, Iowa.^ We had a good small museum in Richmond where I grew up and my parents often took us there after church on Sunday.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

.His father had been born McCoy but took the surname of his neighbors, who adopted him after his own parents had died within a year of one another.^ How can the viewer become enveloped in the color, or experience the “body-transfer” that the artist himself desires, if one’s own image is constantly reflected within the paint?
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

Stella and LeRoy Pollock were Presbyterian; the former, Irish; the latter, Scotch-Irish.[4] LeRoy Pollock was a farmer and later a land surveyor for the government.[3] Jackson grew up in Arizona and Chico, California. .Expelled from one high school in 1928, he enrolled at Los Angeles' Manual Arts High School, from which he was also expelled.^ Born Paul Jackson Pollock in Wyoming, he headed to California, but left before finishing high school to study at the Art Students League in New York.
  • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]
  • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]

^ In the early 70s, as I was finishing high school, Ward had a one-man show at the Virginia Museum.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

^ The exhibition will travel to Tate Modern, London (Spring 2010) and The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (Summer 2010) following its debut in Philadelphia.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

During his early life, he experienced Native American culture while on surveying trips with his father.[3][5] .In 1930, following his brother Charles Pollock, he moved to New York City where they both studied under Thomas Hart Benton at the Art Students League of New York.^ He was born in Cody, Wyoming, and grew up in Arizona and California, later moving to New York in 1930, following his brother, Charles Pollock , where they both studied under Thomas Hart Benton at the Art Students League.
  • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

^ My brother Charles was studying with Benton...
  • Pollock Script - transcript from the screenplay and/or Ed Harris Jackson Pollock movie 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.script-o-rama.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ She moved from Boston to New York in the late 1920s to study art.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

.Benton's rural American subject matter shaped Pollock's work only fleetingly, but his rhythmic use of paint and his fierce independence were more lasting influences.^ Benton's influence on Pollock's formative work can be seen in his use of curvilinear undulating rhythms and in the use of rural American subject matter.
  • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

^ In this process he moved away from figurative art, and changed the Western tradition of using an easel and brush, as well as moving away from use only of the hand and wrist - as he used his whole body to paint.
  • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

^ This research consequently provides potential evidence that Pollock did indeed use acrylic on drip style paintings and not only on his late works.

[3] .From 1935 to 1943, Pollock worked for the WPA Federal Art Project.^ In 2000, she sent the work to the International Foundation for Art Research for authentication; they returned it with a document stating they don't believe the painting to be a Pollock.
  • The Reeler > Features > The $50 Million Question 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.thereeler.com [Source type: General]

^ In the 1970's there was an art teacher at Santa Clara University, Terrence Netter, who emulated the work of Pollock.
  • The Reeler > Features > The $50 Million Question 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.thereeler.com [Source type: General]

^ MY MASTERPIECE and decided it was not done.After finishing I recalled the the way the Hoton and pollock were so similar, and thought maybe just maybe this is her work of art.
  • The Reeler > Features > The $50 Million Question 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.thereeler.com [Source type: General]

[6]

The Springs period and the unique technique

.In October 1945, Pollock married another important American painter, Lee Krasner, and in November they moved to what is now known as the Pollock-Krasner House and Studio in Springs on Long Island, New York.^ Krasner's studio was in the house, she did not work in the barn studio while occupied by Pollock.

^ Born Paul Jackson Pollock in Wyoming, he headed to California, but left before finishing high school to study at the Art Students League in New York.
  • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]
  • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]

^ In the mid-1950s, Fine built a studio in Springs, Long Island, near friends and colleagues Lee Krasner and Jackson Pollock, becoming a member of a sparse but ultimately enduring artistic community.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

.Peggy Guggenheim loaned them the down payment for the wood-frame house with a nearby barn that Pollock made into a studio.^ Krasner's studio was in the house, she did not work in the barn studio while occupied by Pollock.

^ According the Helen Harrison, Director of the Pollock Krasner House, all the paint cans on display belonged to Jackson Pollock and have been preserved as integral to the rest of the studio.

^ Figure 4b shows Pollock in front of his paintings in his barn studio, The Springs, Long Island.

.It was there that he perfected the technique of working spontaneously with liquid paint.^ Also, with no other known evidence of the painting, there needs to be more than 1 thing that is correct with the work.
  • The Reeler > Features > The $50 Million Question 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.thereeler.com [Source type: General]

^ Among his student works were the paintings he had made while studying with Hans Hofmann, and in them, there is a free, gestural energy added to his interest in figure / ground.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

^ The ghosts of many if not most of his works between 1947 and 1953 remain there, along with paint samples, and other evidences of his working process.

.Pollock was introduced to the use of liquid paint in 1936 at an experimental workshop operated in New York City by the Mexican muralist David Alfaro Siqueiros.^ Born Paul Jackson Pollock in Wyoming, he headed to California, but left before finishing high school to study at the Art Students League in New York.
  • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]
  • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]

^ LB: "Siqueiros became a pioneer of the use of synthetic paint media for public spaces who launched an experimental workshop in New York in 1936, attended by Jackson Pollock and other young Americans interested in learning about such new products as Duco (nitrocellulose-based automotive lacquers and industrial paints."

^ This research consequently provides potential evidence that Pollock did indeed use acrylic on drip style paintings and not only on his late works.

.He later used paint pouring as one of several techniques on canvases of the early 1940s, such as "Male and Female" and "Composition with Pouring I." After his move to Springs, he began painting with his canvases laid out on the studio floor, and he developed what was later called his "drip" technique.^ He began painting with his (usually large) canvases placed on the floor, and developed what was called his "drip" technique, or the more preferred term, his "pour" technique.
  • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

^ Flinging, dripping, pouring, spattering - he would energetically move around the canvas, almost like a dance - and would not stop until he saw what he wanted to see.
  • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

^ In this process he moved away from figurative art, and changed the Western tradition of using an easel and brush, as well as moving away from use only of the hand and wrist - as he used his whole body to paint.
  • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

.Therefore, Pollock turned to synthetic resin-based paints called alkyd enamels, which, at that time, was a novel medium.^ When I took paint samples from the floor of the Pollock studio a number of them were taken from paint marks that were clearly overextended drippings while creating a composition - therefore, not accidental spills.

^ Consumers often associate the term with alkyd, so-called oil-based products.

^ Jackson Pollock Black Enamel Paintings - Gagosian Gallery - Madison Avenue, New York City, NY .
  • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]
  • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]

.Pollock described this use of household paints, instead of artist’s paints, as "a natural growth out of a need".[7] He used hardened brushes, sticks, and even basting syringes as paint applicators.^ Each of the artists uses Nature as a point of departure.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

^ This research consequently provides potential evidence that Pollock did indeed use acrylic on drip style paintings and not only on his late works.

^ These particles appear on a match stick from Jackson Pollock's studios floor found embedded in paint.

.Pollock's technique of pouring and dripping paint is thought to be one of the origins of the term action painting.^ This research consequently provides potential evidence that Pollock did indeed use acrylic on drip style paintings and not only on his late works.

^ One problem that I have with monochrome painting in general is that all of the action seems to be relegated to the margins.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

^ An imprint of canvas left in a drip of paint on the floor of the Pollock-Krasner House.

.With this technique, Pollock was able to achieve a more immediate means of creating art, the paint now literally flowing from his chosen tool onto the canvas.^ In 2000, she sent the work to the International Foundation for Art Research for authentication; they returned it with a document stating they don't believe the painting to be a Pollock.
  • The Reeler > Features > The $50 Million Question 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.thereeler.com [Source type: General]

^ The new data now firmly identifies Jackson Pollock as the contributor of the fingerprint on the blue paint can as well as on the Horton submission.

^ Pollocks technique in overextending his pouring movements and thereby the trajectories of flying paint extend beyond the bounds of the canvas.

.By defying the convention of painting on an upright surface, he added a new dimension, literally,[citation needed] by being able to view and apply paint to his canvases from all directions.^ Revision 4: Added Part IV with new findings on paint media, independent confirmation of fingerprint comparison, and references to media coverage.

^ In all cases, whether gestured or minimal, the painting was acknowledged as a unified surface plane and the painting presented as a special object.” VL .
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

^ The art critic, Joseph Masheck suggests in his essay, “The Carpet Paradigm” that all abstract painting might be viewed as either a portrait or a landscape.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

.In the process of making paintings in this way, he moved away from figurative representation, and challenged the Western tradition of using easel and brush.^ However, the intention of the curator was to present a variety of ways of approach to making painting.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

^ The comparison print was discovered on a paint can that was evidently used in the painting process.

^ The brushes in his paint cans can still be moved even though they are submerged considerably.

.He also moved away from the use of only the hand and wrist, since he used his whole body to paint.^ In this process he moved away from figurative art, and changed the Western tradition of using an easel and brush, as well as moving away from use only of the hand and wrist - as he used his whole body to paint.
  • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

^ This research consequently provides potential evidence that Pollock did indeed use acrylic on drip style paintings and not only on his late works.

.In 1956, Time magazine dubbed Pollock "Jack the Dripper" as a result of his unique painting style.^ February 20, 1956: Time magazine refers to Jackson Pollock as "Jack the Dripper."
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

^ This research consequently provides potential evidence that Pollock did indeed use acrylic on drip style paintings and not only on his late works.

^ "Pollock: MoMA exhibit captures the complexity of Jack the Dripper."
  • Jackson Pollock Bibliography | Reviews of the 1998-99 MoMA and Tate Exhibit 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC research.moma.org [Source type: General]

[8]
.My painting does not come from the easel.^ My painting does not come from the easel.

^ My considerations in examining the collected evidence were based on the sole condition that the prints must come from surfaces that had to do with the painting process and be of substances that were used in the painting process i.e.

.I prefer to tack the unstretched canvas to the hard wall or the floor.^ I prefer to tack the unstretched canvas to the hard wall or the floor.
  • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

.I need the resistance of a hard surface.^ I need the resistance of a hard surface.

.On the floor I am more at ease.^ On the floor I am more at ease.
  • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

.I feel nearer, more part of the painting, since this way I can walk around it, work from the four sides and literally be in the painting.^ My own work centers around paint samples from Pollock's studio floor.

^ Since Pollock was known to work alone and had no assistants or pupils, the probability of the fingerprint on the blue paint can being Pollocks is very high.

^ Lastly, I will comment on the statement " Pollock almost always worked within predetermined borders, leaving a significant edge of bare canvas around his paint area".

I continue to get further away from the usual painter's tools such as easel, palette, brushes, etc. .I prefer sticks, trowels, knives and dripping fluid paint or a heavy impasto with sand, broken glass or other foreign matter added.^ I prefer sticks, trowels, knives and dripping fluid paint or a heavy impasto with sand, broken glass or other foreign matter added.
  • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

^ I prefer sticks, trowels, knives and dripping fluid paint or a heavy impasto with sand, broken glass or other foreign matter added.When I am in my painting, I'm not aware of what I'm doing.
  • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

^ He began painting with his (usually large) canvases placed on the floor, and developed what was called his "drip" technique, or the more preferred term, his "pour" technique.
  • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

When I am in my painting, I'm not aware of what I'm doing. It is only after a sort of 'get acquainted' period that I see what I have been about. .I have no fear of making changes, destroying the image, etc., because the painting has a life of its own.^ I have no fear of making changes, destroying the image, etc., because the painting has a life of its own.
  • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

^ How can the viewer become enveloped in the color, or experience the “body-transfer” that the artist himself desires, if one’s own image is constantly reflected within the paint?
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

.I try to let it come through.^ I try to let it come through.
  • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

.It is only when I lose contact with the painting that the result is a mess.^ It is only when I lose contact with the painting that the result is a mess.
  • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

Otherwise there is pure harmony, an easy give and take, and the painting comes out well.
Pollock observed Indian sandpainting demonstrations in the 1940s. Other influences on his dripping technique include the Mexican muralists and Surrealist automatism. .Pollock denied "the accident"; he usually had an idea of how he wanted a particular piece to appear.^ According to Ruth, Pollock initially didn't want her to go but she convinced him it would be a good idea.
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

.His technique combined the movement of his body, over which he had control, the viscous flow of paint, the force of gravity, and the absorption of paint into the canvas.^ It is about as difficult as it would be to describe the myriad physical forces acting on the flowing paint in this most radical artistic process.

^ Pollocks technique in overextending his pouring movements and thereby the trajectories of flying paint extend beyond the bounds of the canvas.

^ Figure 4 also illustrates Pollocks technique in overextending his pouring movements and thereby the trajectories of flying paint extend beyond the bounds of the canvas.

It was a mixture of controllable and uncontrollable factors. .Flinging, dripping, pouring, and spattering, he would move energetically around the canvas, almost as if in a dance, and would not stop until he saw what he wanted to see.^ I’ve been able to see how he would gnaw on an idea sometimes over a span of years, before committing it to canvas.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

^ Lastly, I will comment on the statement " Pollock almost always worked within predetermined borders, leaving a significant edge of bare canvas around his paint area".

.Studies by Taylor, Micolich and Jonas have examined Pollock's technique and have determined that some works display the properties of mathematical fractals.^ Early on, I became familiar with the work of many artists, techniques, art materials and styles including Jackson Pollocks.

^ And like Mondrian, whose early works in particular showed the influence of his spiritual engagement with Theosophy, Ward’s work was to some extent colored by his own spiritual studies.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

^ As the result of these latest examinations my conviction that Teri's Find is indeed a work by Jackson Pollock has been further strengthened.

[9] .They assert that the works become more fractal-like chronologically through Pollock's career.^ These sketchbooks were an important part of his process and it has been fascinating for me to go through them as I have become more familiar with his linear development.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

[10] .The authors even speculate that Pollock may have had an intuition of the nature of chaotic motion, and attempted to form a representation of mathematical chaos, more than ten years before "Chaos Theory" itself was proposed.^ I have many more issues with the orthodoxy of the Radical Painting than with the art itself.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

^ This deleterious effect was slightly diminished in this instance in that the gallery is relying on natural light, so the space is darker, and the light more ambient than one might expect.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

^ To his credit, Marioni manages to achieve more nuance with acrylic paint, than most painters are even capable of realizing with oil.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

.Other experts[11] suggest that Pollock may have merely imitated popular theories of the time in order to give his paintings a depth not previously seen.^ It goes on further to say " I have never seen a Pollock painting made on a canvas such as this.

^ He arrived and she opened a bottle of wine, telling him about the first time she had seen one of his paintings.
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

^ Not only has the painting stood the test of time it has not precipitated any negative feedback from any recognized expert.

.In 1950, Hans Namuth, a young photographer, wanted to photograph and film Pollock at work.^ An extraordinary body of work created by Hans Hofmann for the architect Josep Sert’s 1950 city plan called the Chimbote Project is the genesis for this exhibition.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

.Pollock promised to start a new painting especially for the photographic session, but when Namuth arrived, Pollock apologized and told him the painting was finished.^ The connection to a fingerprint from a paint can from Pollock's studio as well as to an undisputed work by him is very strong evidence.

^ He arrived and she opened a bottle of wine, telling him about the first time she had seen one of his paintings.
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

^ The new data now firmly identifies Jackson Pollock as the contributor of the fingerprint on the blue paint can as well as on the Horton submission.

Namuth's comment upon entering the studio:
.A dripping wet canvas covered the entire floor.^ An imprint of canvas left in a drip of paint on the floor of the Pollock-Krasner House.

. . There was complete silence. . . .Pollock looked at the painting.^ The song "Going Down" also features the cryptic line "Yeah, she look like a painting / Jackson Pollock's, Number 5."
  • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

^ While that finding may look promising, Pollock experts such as Karmel say the paints Pollock used were common and widely used by many artists.
  • Exclusive: Mystery painting by Jackson Pollock? | Scottsdale Arizona News - Scottsdale News - Scottsdale AZ news | eastvalleytribune.com 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.eastvalleytribune.com [Source type: News]

^ There was complete silence… Pollock looked at the painting .
  • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

Then, unexpectedly, he picked up can and paint brush and started to move around the canvas. It was as if he suddenly realized the painting was not finished. .His movements, slow at first, gradually became faster and more dance like as he flung black, white, and rust colored paint onto the canvas.^ From the earliest black and white diamonds, Ward was interested in the primary vertical structure of the form, and its reinforced cruciform symmetry lent itself to the punchy diagrammatic nature of some of his more mandala-like paintings, especially in later diamond works from the 80s and 90s.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

^ What often appears black at first glance is often two or more distinct color glazes that produce the effect of black in their overlay.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

^ Wouldn’t more internalized counterpoints, besides marginalia, be advantageous to the advancement of color painting?
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

He completely forgot that Lee and I were there; he did not seem to hear the click of the camera shutter. . . My photography session lasted as long as he kept painting, perhaps half an hour. .In all that time, Pollock did not stop.^ Did you people eat like this all the time?
  • Pollock Script - transcript from the screenplay and/or Ed Harris Jackson Pollock movie 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.script-o-rama.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.How could one keep up this level of activity?^ How could one keep up this level of activity?
  • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

^ Although in Ruth's account she maintains that she was the one who wanted to end the relationship, she also recounts how devastated she was by the break-up.
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

Finally, he said 'This is it.'
.Pollock’s finest paintings… reveal that his all-over line does not give rise to positive or negative areas: we are not made to feel that one part of the canvas demands to be read as figure, whether abstract or representational, against another part of the canvas read as ground.^ The painting had to have been done with the canvas being level with the ground.

^ It goes on further to say " I have never seen a Pollock painting made on a canvas such as this.

^ One problem that I have with monochrome painting in general is that all of the action seems to be relegated to the margins.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

There is not inside or outside to Pollock’s line or the space through which it moves…. .Pollock has managed to free line not only from its function of representing objects in the world, but also from its task of describing or bounding shapes or figures, whether abstract or representational, on the surface of the canvas.^ Figure 4 also illustrates Pollocks technique in overextending his pouring movements and thereby the trajectories of flying paint extend beyond the bounds of the canvas.

(Karmel 132)
Pollock's Studio in Springs, New York.

The 1950s and beyond

Pollock's most famous paintings were made during the "drip period" between 1947 and 1950. He rocketed to popular status following an August 8, 1949 four-page spread in Life Magazine that asked, "Is he the greatest living painter in the United States?" At the peak of his fame, Pollock abruptly abandoned the drip style.[12]
.Pollock's work after 1951 was darker in color, including a collection painted in black on unprimed canvases.^ Even the patterns of paint on the floor itself, where lines and drops of pigment had spilled over from the edges of the recumbent canvases, were recognizably 'Pollock.'
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

^ Transit, the painting that you mentioned at the very beginning of our talk and that was included in the Singular Forms show at the Guggenheim, is a good example of his breakthrough work.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

This was followed by a return to color,[13] and he reintroduced figurative elements. .During this period Pollock had moved to a more commercial gallery and there was great demand from collectors for new paintings.^ During that period Ward had also been regularly sending me copies of the publication that he and two partners had started called Art Now New York.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

^ The new data now firmly identifies Jackson Pollock as the contributor of the fingerprint on the blue paint can as well as on the Horton submission.

^ New York in the 50s must have been a great place to be a young painter with its heated air of intense debate and discussion and Ward was there.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

In response to this pressure, along with personal frustration, his alcoholism deepened.[citation needed]

From naming to numbering

.Pollock wanted an end to the viewer's search for representational elements in his paintings, thus he abandoned titles and started numbering the paintings instead.^ This works well here in that I specially wanted to see if the paints on Teri's painting were like those on the Pollock studio floor.

^ Exploded view of the fingerprint under examination from Jackson Pollock: Untitled (Red Painting Number 4) c.

^ When I took paint samples from the floor of the Pollock studio a number of them were taken from paint marks that were clearly overextended drippings while creating a composition - therefore, not accidental spills.

.Of this, Pollock commented: "...look passively and try to receive what the painting has to offer and not bring a subject matter or preconceived idea of what they are to be looking for."^ Still, I loved the idea that we had an artist in the family and felt a real kinship with him just from looking at his paintings.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

^ Lastly, I will comment on the statement " Pollock almost always worked within predetermined borders, leaving a significant edge of bare canvas around his paint area".

^ I came away from my personal experience of Teris Find , though subjective then, that it is exactly what it appears to be: a poured painting by Jackson Pollock c.

.Pollock's wife, Lee Krasner, said Pollock "used to give his pictures conventional titles...^ July 9, 1956: Jackson Pollock asks Ruth Kligman to move in after Lee Krasner decides to leave for Europe.
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

^ So, I arranged a visit to the Pollock- Krasner House being keen to see the many paint cans and tools exhibited there that were used by Jackson Pollock .

^ In all, 33 partial fingerprints were documented at the Pollock Krasner House, and many more that are too partial to be useful.

but now he simply numbers them. Numbers are neutral. They make people look at a picture for what it is - pure painting."[7]

Death

Jackson Pollock's grave in the rear with Lee Krasner's grave in front in the Green River Cemetery.
.In 1955 Pollock painted Scent and Search which proved to be his last two paintings.^ Outstanding issues are the comparison of pigment samples from Teri's find with paint samples collected at the Pollock-Krasner House as well as the DNA work on the two sets of hair samples.

[14] .Pollock did not paint at all in 1956.[13] After struggling with alcoholism his entire life, Pollock's career was cut short on August 11, 1956 at 10:15pm when he died in a single-car crash in his Oldsmobile convertible while driving under the influence of alcohol.^ This research consequently provides potential evidence that Pollock did indeed use acrylic on drip style paintings and not only on his late works.

^ Exploded view of the fingerprint under examination from Jackson Pollock: Untitled (Red Painting Number 4) c.

^ A strand of hair under the painted surface of the floor of the Pollock studio.

.One of the passengers, Edith Metzger, was also killed in the accident, which occurred less than a mile from Pollock's home.^ Jackson Pollock was killed last night in an automobile accident.'
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

^ August 11, 1956 (Night): Jackson Pollock and Edith Metzger die in a car accident.
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

^ Janis recalled "we had a little less trouble selling a de Kooning for $10,000 than we had a month earlier trying to sell one for $5,000."
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

The other passenger, Pollock's girlfriend Ruth Kligman, survived.[15] .After Pollock's death at the age of 44, his widow, Lee Krasner, managed his estate and ensured that Pollock's reputation remained strong despite changing art-world trends.^ July 9, 1956: Jackson Pollock asks Ruth Kligman to move in after Lee Krasner decides to leave for Europe.
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

^ Early August, 1956: Jackson Pollock tells Ruth Kligman that Lee Krasner is coming back.
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

^ After the funeral Lee Krasner returned to her and Jackson's home in the Springs and then moved to Manhattan where she would remain for the next two years.
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

.They are buried in Green River Cemetery in Springs with a large boulder marking his grave and a smaller one marking hers.^ Later a boulder would be erected on the grave to mark it.
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

^ Jackson Pollock was buried in Green River Cemetery in the Springs.
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

Legacy

.The Pollock-Krasner House and Studio is owned and administered by the Stony Brook Foundation, a non-profit affiliate of the State University of New York at Stony Brook.^ Krasner's studio was in the house, she did not work in the barn studio while occupied by Pollock.

^ Tuesday, August 7, 1956: Ruth Kligman tells Jackson Pollock she is going to New York for a few days.
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

^ My own work centers around paint samples from Pollock's studio floor.

There are regular tours of the house and studio from May through October.
A separate organization, the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, was established in 1985. The Foundation not only functions as the official Estate for both Pollock and his widow Lee Krasner, but also, under the terms of Krasner's will, serves "to assist individual working artists of merit with financial need."[16] The U.S. copyright representative for the Pollock-Krasner Foundation is the Artists Rights Society (ARS).[17]
.His papers were donated by Lee Krasner in 1983 to the Archives of American Art.^ They are excerpted here only as relevant from the Smithsonian Archives on American Art.

^ Entry tags: Jackson Pollock , Lee Krasner , Pollock-Krasner House Action/Abstraction: Pollock, de Kooning, and American Art, 1940-1976, The Jewish Museum, New York, NY .
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

.They were later included with Lee Krasner's own papers.^ Bir insists that the same materials spattered the floor of the artist's studio - never mind that the stains might have been made much later by Lee Krasner, Pollock's wife and a successful painter in her own right.

^ Lee Krasner discovered Ruth and Jackson as they were walking toward the car after they had secretly spent the night together in the barn while Krasner was sleeping in the house.
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

.The Archives of American Art also houses the Charles Pollock Papers which includes correspondence, photographs, and other files relating to his brother, Jackson Pollock.^ In other news, the first complete-- Jackson Pollock?
  • Pollock Script - transcript from the screenplay and/or Ed Harris Jackson Pollock movie 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.script-o-rama.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ "Der Mut der frühen Jahre: Das New Yorker Museum of Modern Art zeigt eine grosse Retrospektive des Malers Jackson Pollock."
  • Jackson Pollock Bibliography | Reviews of the 1998-99 MoMA and Tate Exhibit 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC research.moma.org [Source type: General]

^ So, I arranged a visit to the Pollock- Krasner House being keen to see the many paint cans and tools exhibited there that were used by Jackson Pollock .

Pollock in pop culture & news

.In 1960, Ornette Coleman's album "Free Jazz" featured a Pollock painting as its cover artwork.^ Pollocks liking for aluminium paint, which he applies freely straight out of the can.

In 1973, Blue Poles (Blue Poles: Number 11, 1952), was purchased by the Australian Whitlam Government for the National Gallery of Australia for US $2 million (AU $1.3 million at the time of payment). .At the time, this was the highest price ever paid for a modern painting.^ Time magazine referred to him as the "shock trooper of modern painting."
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

In the conservative climate of the time, the purchase created a political and media scandal. .The painting is now one of the most popular exhibits in the gallery, and is thought to be worth between $100 and $150 million, according to 2006 estimates.^ This is easily one of the most ambitious painting exhibitions of the year.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

^ His first one-person exhibition was at the Tibor de Nagy Gallery in 1955.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

^ At roughly seven by seven feet, the smallest but still sizable painting in the exhibition, also titled Painting, 2006, is also one of the show’s most radiant.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

[18] .It was a centerpiece of the Museum of Modern Art's 1998 retrospective in New York, the first time the painting had returned to America since its purchase.^ (JP248-9) She returned to New York immediately.
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

^ The exhibition consisted of 209 paintings, sculptures and prints selected by The Museum of Modern Art in New York.
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

^ In 1968, he was given a major retrospective at the Guggenheim Museum in New York.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

.In 1999 a CD titled Jackson Pollock Jazz was released and only available at the MOMA.^ Reviews of the 1998-99 MoMA and Tate Exhibit Jackson Pollock Bibliography : Reviews of the 199899 Exhibition Jackson Pollock (at its MoMA and Tate Gallery venues) how to search .
  • Jackson Pollock Bibliography | Reviews of the 1998-99 MoMA and Tate Exhibit 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC research.moma.org [Source type: General]

^ Reviews of the Jackson Pollock Exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, November 1, 1998February 2, 1999 top .
  • Jackson Pollock Bibliography | Reviews of the 1998-99 MoMA and Tate Exhibit 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC research.moma.org [Source type: General]

^ "Jackson Pollock in het MoMA in New York."
  • Jackson Pollock Bibliography | Reviews of the 1998-99 MoMA and Tate Exhibit 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC research.moma.org [Source type: General]

The CD had 17 tracks with jazz music inspired by Pollock. The CD has been discontinued.
In 2000, the biographical film Pollock was released. Marcia Gay Harden won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her portrayal of Lee Krasner. .The movie was the project of Ed Harris who portrayed Pollock and directed it.^ Finally, the Pollock script is here for all you fans of the second Harry Potter movie starring Ed Harris as Jackson Pollock and Marcia Gay Harden, who won an Oscar .  This script is a transcript that was painstakingly transcribed using the screenplay and/or viewings of Pollock.
  • Pollock Script - transcript from the screenplay and/or Ed Harris Jackson Pollock movie 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.script-o-rama.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Pollock Script - transcript from the screenplay and/or Ed Harris Jackson Pollock movie Pollock Script - Dialogue Transcript .
  • Pollock Script - transcript from the screenplay and/or Ed Harris Jackson Pollock movie 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.script-o-rama.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

He was nominated for Academy Award for Best Actor.
.In 2003, twenty-four Pollock-esque paintings and drawings were found in a Wainscott, New York locker.^ These particles appear on a match stick from Jackson Pollock's studios floor found embedded in paint.

^ In the 1950’s four highly different approaches to painting might be said to have surfaced represented by Jackson Pollock, Rothko, Kline and Clifford Still.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

^ "A New York, una mostra celebra Jackson Pollock " Vogue Italia (Milan) no.
  • Jackson Pollock Bibliography | Reviews of the 1998-99 MoMA and Tate Exhibit 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC research.moma.org [Source type: General]

.There is an inconclusive ongoing debate about whether or not these works are Pollock originals.^ Additionally I have the opportunity to also apply these techniques to pigment samples from Jackson Pollock material where there is no doubt about authenticity.

^ (PP328) Although Pollock talked about getting back to work, he never did.
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

^ As the result of these latest examinations my conviction that Teri's Find is indeed a work by Jackson Pollock has been further strengthened.

Physicists have argued over whether fractals can be used to authenticate the paintings. .This would require an analysis of geometric consistency of the paint splatters in Pollock's work at a microscopic level, and would be measured against the finding that patterns in Pollock's paintings increased in complexity with time.^ This research consequently provides potential evidence that Pollock did indeed use acrylic on drip style paintings and not only on his late works.

^ Lastly, I will comment on the statement " Pollock almost always worked within predetermined borders, leaving a significant edge of bare canvas around his paint area".

^ I came away from my personal experience of Teris Find , though subjective then, that it is exactly what it appears to be: a poured painting by Jackson Pollock c.

[19] .Analysis of the synthetic pigments shows that some were not patented until the 1980s, and therefore that it is highly improbable that Pollock could have used such paints.^ This research consequently provides potential evidence that Pollock did indeed use acrylic on drip style paintings and not only on his late works.

^ It goes on further to say " I have never seen a Pollock painting made on a canvas such as this.

^ So, I arranged a visit to the Pollock- Krasner House being keen to see the many paint cans and tools exhibited there that were used by Jackson Pollock .

[20][21]
In November 2006, Pollock's No. 5, 1948 became the world's most expensive painting, when it was sold privately to an undisclosed buyer for the sum of $140,000,000. The previous owner was film and music-producer David Geffen. It is rumored that the current owner is a German businessman and art collector.
.Also in 2006 a documentary, Who the #$&% Is Jackson Pollock? was made concerning Teri Horton, a truck driver who in 1992 bought an abstract painting for the price of five dollars at a thrift store in California.^ The painting was bought in 1992 or 1993.

^ Based on the foregoing, I am personally convinced that Teri's find is indeed a work by Jackson Pollock until the present evidence is disproved.

^ It goes on further to say " I have never seen a Pollock painting made on a canvas such as this.

.This work may be a lost Pollock painting.^ This research consequently provides potential evidence that Pollock did indeed use acrylic on drip style paintings and not only on his late works.

^ The connection to a fingerprint from a paint can from Pollock's studio as well as to an undisputed work by him is very strong evidence.

^ My own work centers around paint samples from Pollock's studio floor.

If so it would be worth millions; its authenticity, however, remains debated.
In September 2009, Henry Adams claimed in Smithsonian Magazine that Pollock had written his name in his famous painting "Mural"[22]

Relationship to Native American art

.Pollock stated: “I feel nearer, more a part of the painting, since this way I can walk round it, work from the four sides and literally be in the painting.^ Frank Stella making paintings that are equal parts Pollock and Johns.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

^ In the 1950’s four highly different approaches to painting might be said to have surfaced represented by Jackson Pollock, Rothko, Kline and Clifford Still.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

^ Since Pollock was known to work alone and had no assistants or pupils, the probability of the fingerprint on the blue paint can being Pollocks is very high.

This is akin to the methods of the Indian sand painters of the West.”[23]

Critical debate

.Pollock's work has always polarized critics and has been the focus of many important critical debates.^ My own work and sensibility, though, has always had a softer focus.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

^ Early on, I became familiar with the work of many artists, techniques, art materials and styles including Jackson Pollocks.

^ "It is impossible to make a forgery of Jackson Pollock's work," Time magazine critic Robert Hughes claimed in 1982.

.In a famous 1952 article in ARTnews, Harold Rosenberg coined the term "action painting," and wrote that "what was to go on the canvas was not a picture but an event.^ How do you go about getting the paint on the canvas?
  • Pollock Script - transcript from the screenplay and/or Ed Harris Jackson Pollock movie 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.script-o-rama.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Since the particles also appear on the top of the finished surface of the painting it is reasonable to suggest that the event of the creation as well as of the preparation of the canvas took place in the same environment.

The big moment came when it was decided to paint 'just to paint.' The gesture on the canvas was a gesture of liberation from value — political, aesthetic, moral." Many people assumed that he had modeled his "action painter" paradigm on Pollock.
Clement Greenberg supported Pollock's work on formalistic grounds. .It fit well with Greenberg's view of art history as a progressive purification in form and elimination of historical content.^ Feeley’s abstract works with their bright colors, simple repetitive forms and symmetrical compositions occupy an important place in the history of twentieth-century American art.
  • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

.He therefore saw Pollock's work as the best painting of its day and the culmination of the Western tradition going back via Cubism and Cézanne to Manet.^ This research consequently provides potential evidence that Pollock did indeed use acrylic on drip style paintings and not only on his late works.

^ The connection to a fingerprint from a paint can from Pollock's studio as well as to an undisputed work by him is very strong evidence.

^ My own work centers around paint samples from Pollock's studio floor.

.Some posthumous exhibitions of Pollock's work were sponsored by the Congress for Cultural Freedom, an organization to promote American culture and values backed by the CIA.^ (PP328) Although Pollock talked about getting back to work, he never did.
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

.Certain left-wing scholars, most prominently Eva Cockcroft, argue that the U.S. government and wealthy elite embraced Pollock and abstract expressionism in order to place the United States firmly in the forefront of global art and devalue socialist realism.^ June 1956: Jackson Pollock rejects label of "Abstract Expressionism."
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

^ Jackson Pollock commented that he didn't care for the label of "Abstract Expressionism" (or "nonobjective" or nonrepresentational") in an interview with Selden Rodman for the book Conversations with Artists .
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

^ The Pollock-De Kooning breakthrough soon found a following, and a label: abstract expressionism.
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

[24][25] In the words of Cockcroft, Pollock became a "weapon of the Cold War".[26]
.Painter Norman Rockwell's work Connoisseur[27] also appears to make a commentary on the Pollock style.^ This research consequently provides potential evidence that Pollock did indeed use acrylic on drip style paintings and not only on his late works.

^ Again, the work of Jackson Pollock is so unique and complex that, and it has been said by noted connoisseurs on Pollock, that his work defies forgery [xxxi] a view I happen to share.

^ Early on, I became familiar with the work of many artists, techniques, art materials and styles including Jackson Pollocks.

.The painting features what seems to be a rather upright man in a suit standing before a Jackson Pollock-like spatter painting.^ Bill and I always wanted to a child" and would tell others at the Cedar that the baby looked like Jackson Pollock.
  • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

^ You're Jackson Pollock and you don't paint!
  • Pollock Script - transcript from the screenplay and/or Ed Harris Jackson Pollock movie 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.script-o-rama.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ "Jackson Pollock is participating at his first one-man show...
  • Pollock Script - transcript from the screenplay and/or Ed Harris Jackson Pollock movie 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.script-o-rama.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Others such as artist, critic, and satirist Craig Brown, have been "astonished that decorative 'wallpaper', essentially brainless, could gain such a position in art history alongside Giotto, Titian, and Velázquez."[28]
Reynold's News in a 1959 headline said, "This is not art — it's a joke in bad taste."[24]

List of major works

.
Number 1, 1950 (Lavender Mist), National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC.

Notes

  1. ^ Naifeh, Steven and Smith, Gregory White, Jackson Pollock:an American saga, p.503, Published by Clarkson N. Potter, Inc.1989, ISBN 0-517-56084-4
  2. ^ Varnedoe, Kirk and Karmel, Pepe, Jackson Pollock: Essays, Chronology, and Bibliography. Exhibition catalog, New York: The Museum of Modern Art, Chronology pp. 315–329, 1998, ISBN 0-87070-069-3.
  3. ^ a b c d Piper, David. The Illustrated History of Art, ISBN 0753701790, p460-461.
  4. ^ B. H. Friedman, Jackson Pollock: Energy Made Visible, p.4. Da Capo Press, 1995, ISBN 0306806649
  5. ^ Robert Sickels, The 1940s, p.223. Greenwood Publishing Group, 2004, ISBN 0313312990
  6. ^ "Jackson Pollock". The American Museum of Beat Art. http://www.beatmuseum.org/pollock/jacksonpollock.html. Retrieved 2007-09-28. 
  7. ^ a b Boddy-Evans, Marion. "What Paint Did Pollock Use?". about.com. http://painting.about.com/od/colourtheory/a/Pollock_paint.htm. Retrieved 2007-09-28. 
  8. ^ "The Wild Ones". Time (magazine). http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,808194-2,00.html. Retrieved 2008-09-15. 
  9. ^ Pollock or Not? Can Fractals Spot a Fake Masterpiece?, by JR Minkel for Scientific American, 31 October 2007. Retrieved 29 January 2009.
  10. ^ Taylor, Richard; Micolich, Adam P.; Jonas, David, Can Science Be Used To Further Our Understanding Of Art?, http://www.phys.unsw.edu.au/phys_about/PHYSICS!/FRACTAL_EXPRESSIONISM/fractal_taylor.html, retrieved 2008-09-15 
  11. ^ Ouellette, Jennifer (2001-11-01). "Physicist Richard Taylor's study". Discover magazine. http://discovermagazine.com/2001/nov/featpollock. Retrieved January 28, 2009. 
  12. ^ Jerry Saltz. "The Tempest" (reprint). Artnet.com. http://www.artnet.com/magazineus/features/saltz/saltz9-18-06.asp. Retrieved 2009-08-30. 
  13. ^ a b "Biography". Jackson-pollock.com. http://www.jackson-pollock.com/biography.html. Retrieved 2007-09-28. 
  14. ^ Abstract Expressionism in 1955. Retrieved August 28, 2009.
  15. ^ Varnedoe, Kirk and Karmel, Pepe, Jackson Pollock: Essays, Chronology, and Bibliography. Exhibition catalog, New York: The Museum of Modern Art, Chronology, p.328, 1998, ISBN 0-87070-069-3
  16. ^ "The Pollock-Krasner Foundation website: Press Release page". Pkf.org. http://www.pkf.org/press.html. Retrieved 2009-08-30. 
  17. ^ "Most frequently requested artists list of the Artists Rights Society". Arsny.com. http://arsny.com/requested.html. Retrieved 2009-08-30. 
  18. ^ "Our Poles world's top-priced painting?". The Canberra Times. November 4, 2006. http://canberra.yourguide.com.au/detail.asp?class=news&subclass=general&story_id=528424&category=General&m=11&y=2006. 
  19. ^ Schreyach, Michael (2007-08-01). "I am nature". Apollo. http://apollo-magazine.co.uk/features/71129/i-am-nature.thtml. Retrieved 2009-06-02. "An attempt has been made to determine the authenticity of some newly discovered paintings that may be by Jackson Pollock on the basis of a belief that his art incorporates fractal patterns seen in the natural world" 
  20. ^ Kennedy, Randy (December 2, 2006). "The Case of Pollock’s Fractals Focuses on Physics". New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/02/books/02frac.html?ex=1322715600&en=088aba6319b31d32&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss. Retrieved 2009-08-30. 
  21. ^ McGuigan, Cathleen (August 20–27, 2007). "Seeing Is Believing? Is this a real Jackson Pollock? A mysterious trove of pictures rocks the art world". Newsweek. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20216976/site/newsweek/. Retrieved 2009-08-30. 
  22. ^ http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/Decoding-Jackson-Pollock.html?utm_source=dedicated09252009&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=JacksonPollock
  23. ^ Jackson Pollock, "My Painting", in Pollock: Painting (edited by Barbara Rose), Agrinde Publications Ltd: New York (1980), page 65; originally published in Possibilities I, New York, Winter 1947-8
  24. ^ a b "Expression of an age". Pubs.socialistreviewindex.org.uk. http://pubs.socialistreviewindex.org.uk/sr229/molyneux.htm. Retrieved 2009-08-30. 
  25. ^ Saunders, F. S. (2000), The Cultural Cold War. The CIA and the World of Arts and Letters, New York: Free Press.
  26. ^ Eva Cockcroft, ‘Abstract Expressionism, Weapon of the Cold War’ in Artforum vol.12, no.10, June 1974, pp. 43–54.
  27. ^ Rockwell, Norman the Artchive
  28. ^ BBC2 Late Review: review of Jackson Pollock exhibition at the Tate Gallery, London, 1999
  29. ^ "Male and Female" (jpeg). www.ibiblio.org. http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/pollock/pollock.male-female.jpg. 
  30. ^ "Stenographic Figure" (jpeg). www.ibiblio.org. http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/pollock/pollock.stenographic.jpg. 
  31. ^ "UIMA: Mural". Uiowa.edu. http://www.uiowa.edu/uima/collections/img/eur-amer/1959_6.html. Retrieved 2009-08-30. 
  32. ^ a b Posted by University of Iowa Museum of Art (2009-03-24). "Art Matters: UIMA moves first paintings into the Figge Art Museum". Uima.blogspot.com. http://uima.blogspot.com/2009/03/uima-moves-first-paintings-into-figge.html. Retrieved 2009-08-30. 
  33. ^ "Moon-Woman Cuts the Circle" (jpeg). www.beatmuseum.org. http://www.beatmuseum.org/pollock/images/moon.jpg. 
  34. ^ "The She-Wolf" (jpeg). www.ibiblio.org. http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/pollock/pollock.she-wolf.jpg. 
  35. ^ "Blue (Moby Dick)" (jpeg). www.ibiblio.org. http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/pollock/pollock.moby-dick.jpg. 
  36. ^ "Troubled Queen". www.mfa.org. http://www.mfa.org/collections/search_art.asp?recview=true&id=34645&coll_keywords=Pollock&coll_accession=&coll_name=&coll_artist=&coll_place=&coll_medium=&coll_culture=&coll_classification=&coll_credit=&coll_provenance=&coll_location=&coll_has_images=&coll_on_view=&coll_sort=1&coll_sort_order=1&coll_view=0&coll_package=0&coll_start=1. 
  37. ^ "Eyes in the Heat" (jpeg). www.ibiblio.org. http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/pollock/pollock.eyes-heat.jpg. 
  38. ^ "The Key" (jpeg). www.ibiblio.org. http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/pollock/pollock.key.jpg. 
  39. ^ "The Tea Cup" (jpeg). www.ibiblio.org. http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/pollock/pollock.tea-cup.jpg. 
  40. ^ "Shimmering Substance" (jpeg). www.ibiblio.org. http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/pollock/pollock.shimmering.jpg. 
  41. ^ "Portrait of H.M.". digital.lib.uiowa.edu. http://digital.lib.uiowa.edu/cdm4/document.php?CISOROOT=/uima&CISOPTR=213&REC=5. 
  42. ^ "Full Fathom Five" (jpeg). www.ibiblio.org. http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/pollock/fathom-five/pollock.fathom-five.jpg. 
  43. ^ "Jackson Pollock - Painting - Cathedral". Beatmuseum.org. http://www.beatmuseum.org/pollock/cathedral.html. Retrieved 2009-08-30. 
  44. ^ "Enchanted Forest" (jpeg). www.guggenheimcollection.org. http://www.guggenheimcollection.org/images/lists/work/129_4_lg.jpg. 
  45. ^ "Jackson Pollock's Lucifer". SFMOMA. http://www.sfmoma.org/multimedia/interactive_features/61#. Retrieved 2009-08-30. 
  46. ^ "Painting" (jpeg). www.centrepompidou.fr. http://www.centrepompidou.fr/images/oeuvres/XL/3I01535.jpg. 
  47. ^ "New Orleans Museum of Art Educational Guide". www.noma.org. http://www.noma.org/educationguides/Pollock.pdf. 
  48. ^ "Number 1". www.moca.org. http://www.moca.org/museum/pc_artwork_detail.php?&acsnum=89.23&keywords=No.%201%2C%201949&x=27&y=3. 
  49. ^ "Number 10". www.mfa.org. http://www.mfa.org/collections/search_art.asp?recview=true&id=34114&coll_keywords=Pollock&coll_accession=&coll_name=&coll_artist=&coll_place=&coll_medium=&coll_culture=&coll_classification=&coll_credit=&coll_provenance=&coll_location=&coll_has_images=&coll_on_view=&coll_sort=1&coll_sort_order=1&coll_view=0&coll_package=0&coll_start=1. 
  50. ^ "Number 1, 1950 (Lavender Mist)" (jpeg). www.ibiblio.org. http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/pollock/lavender-mist/pollock.lavender-mist.jpg. 
  51. ^ "Autumn Rhythm (Number 30)". The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. http://www.metmuseum.org/Works_of_Art/viewOne.asp?dep=21&viewmode=0&item=57.92. Retrieved 2009-08-30. 
  52. ^ "Artist Page: Jackson Pollock". Cybermuse.gallery.ca. http://cybermuse.gallery.ca/cybermuse/search/artist_e.jsp?iartistid=4391. Retrieved 2009-08-30. 
  53. ^ "One: Number 31, 1950". MoMA. http://www.moma.org/collection/browse_results.php?object_id=78386. Retrieved 2009-08-30. 
  54. ^ "Jackson Pollock - Kunstsammlung NRW". Kunstsammlung.de. 2006-02-17. http://www.kunstsammlung.de/index.php?id=179&L=1. Retrieved 2009-08-30. 
  55. ^ "Number 7, 1951 - Image". Nga.gov. http://www.nga.gov/cgi-bin/pimage?62343+0+0. Retrieved 2009-08-30. 
  56. ^ "Convergence". www.albrightknox.org. http://www.albrightknox.org/ArtStart/art/K1956_7.jpg. 
  57. ^ "Blue poles". Nga.gov.au. http://nga.gov.au/International/Catalogue/Detail.cfm?IRN=36334&ViewID=2&GalID=1. Retrieved 2009-08-30. 
  58. ^ "Portrait and a Dream". The Guardian. http://arts.guardian.co.uk/portrait/story/0,,991689,00.html. Retrieved 2009-08-30. 
  59. ^ "Easter and the Totem" (jpeg). www.ibiblio.org. http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/pollock/pollock.easter-totem.jpg. 
  60. ^ "Ocean Greyness" (jpeg). www.artbarreiro.com. http://www.artbarreiro.com/artistas/pollock/photos/oceanGreyness.jpg. 

See also

References

.
  • Herskovic, Marika, American Abstract and Figurative Expressionism Style Is Timely Art Is Timeless An Illustrated Survey With Artists' Statements, Artwork and Biographies. (New York School Press, 2009.) ISBN 9780967799421. p. 127; p. 196-199
  • Herskovic, Marika.^ Jackson's death made the front page of The New York Times and was covered in most of the major newspapers and magazines.
    • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

    ^ (S.P., "About Art and Artists: Work of 12 Contemporary U.S. Painters and Sculptors at the Modern Museum," The New York Times (May 30, 1956)) .
    • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

    ^ (Kline's obituary in The New York Times in 1962 mentions that Kline exhibited in a group show of American artists at the Tate in 1956 but doesn't specify the actual exhibition name or dates).
    • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

    American .Abstract Expressionism of the 1950s An Illustrated Survey, (New York School Press, 2003.) ISBN 0-9677994-1-4. pp. 262–265
  • Herskovic, Marika.^ Art Press (New York) no.
    • Jackson Pollock Bibliography | Reviews of the 1998-99 MoMA and Tate Exhibit 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC research.moma.org [Source type: General]

    ^ New York Observer , November 9, 1998, pp.
    • Jackson Pollock Bibliography | Reviews of the 1998-99 MoMA and Tate Exhibit 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC research.moma.org [Source type: General]

    ^ "Jackson Pollock and the New York School."
    • Jackson Pollock Bibliography | Reviews of the 1998-99 MoMA and Tate Exhibit 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC research.moma.org [Source type: General]

    .New York School Abstract Expressionists Artists Choice by Artists, (New York School Press, 2000.) ISBN 0-9677994-0-6. p. 18; p. 38; pp. 278–281
  • Karmel, Pepe, (Ed),Jackson Pollock: Key Interviews, Articles and Reviews Museum of Modern Art, Pepe Karmel, and Kirk Varnedoe (Editors), Publisher: Abrams,Harry N Inc., ISBN 0-87070037-5, 1999.
  • Varnedoe, Kirk and Karmel, Pepe, Jackson Pollock: Essays, Chronology, and Bibliography.^ "New Yorker Museum ehrt Jackson Pollock."
    • Jackson Pollock Bibliography | Reviews of the 1998-99 MoMA and Tate Exhibit 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC research.moma.org [Source type: General]

    ^ The article was about the direction of modern art.
    • Pollock Script - transcript from the screenplay and/or Ed Harris Jackson Pollock movie 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.script-o-rama.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Reviews of the Jackson Pollock Exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, November 1, 1998February 2, 1999 top .
    • Jackson Pollock Bibliography | Reviews of the 1998-99 MoMA and Tate Exhibit 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC research.moma.org [Source type: General]

    Exhibition catalog, New York: The Museum of Modern Art, 1998, ISBN 0-87070-069-3.
  • O'Connor, Francis V. Jackson Pollock [exhibition catalogue] (New York, Museum of Modern Art, [1967]) OCLC 165852
  • Taylor, Richard; Micolich, Adam; Jonas, David: Fractal Expressionism, Physics World, October 1999
  • Naifeh, Steven and Smith, Gregory White, Jackson Pollock:an American saga, Published by Clarkson N. Potter, Inc.1989, ISBN 0-517-56084-4
  • http://www.jackson-pollock.com/didyouknow.html

External links

.

Museums


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

.Paul Jackson Pollock (1912-01-281956-08-11) was one of the leading artists and an influential American painter in the Abstract Expressionist movement, together with Willem de Kooning.^ Lot 33: Jackson Pollock (1912-1956) .
  • Jackson Pollock [1912-1956]: Auction Price Results - Artfact 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfact.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Lot 28: Jackson Pollock (1912-1956) .
  • Jackson Pollock [1912-1956]: Auction Price Results - Artfact 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfact.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Painter Paul Jackson Pollock (January 28, 1912 – August 11, 1956) was an influential American painter and a major force in the abstract expressionist movement.
  • Today In History™ - January 28 1912 Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC my.opera.com [Source type: General]

Sourced

  • I am nature.(1942) .
    • As quoted by Lee Krasner in an interview with Dorothy Strickler (1964-11-02) for the Smithsonian Institution Archives of American Art.^ Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC .
      • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]
      • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]

      ^ Color as Field - American Painting, 19501975 - Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC .
      • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]
      • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]

      ^ Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution Smithsonian Archives of American Art Advanced Search Home About Us Research Collections Exhibitions Publications News & Events Support the Archives Ask Us Research Collections > Collections Online > Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers > Jackson Pollock And Lee Krasner Papers, circa 1905-1984 .
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      .In Krasner's words, "When I brought Hofmann up to meet Pollock and see his work which was before we moved here, Hofmann’s reaction was — one of the questions he asked Jackson was, do you work from nature?^ No one asked you!
      • Pollock Script - transcript from the screenplay and/or Ed Harris Jackson Pollock movie 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.script-o-rama.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ What do you think of Jackson Pollock?
      • Pollock Script - transcript from the screenplay and/or Ed Harris Jackson Pollock movie 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.script-o-rama.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ You've got to see his work.
      • Pollock Script - transcript from the screenplay and/or Ed Harris Jackson Pollock movie 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.script-o-rama.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      .There were no still lifes around or models around and Jackson’s answer was, 'I am nature.'^ Additionally I have the opportunity to also apply these techniques to pigment samples from Jackson Pollock material where there is no doubt about authenticity.

      ^ To date, some still claim there are no fingerprints in the Pollock-Krasner House.

      ^ Think about it: why are there no apples in a Jackson Pollock?
      • Haber's Art Reviews: Jackson Pollock at the Modern 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.haberarts.com [Source type: Original source]

      .And Hofmann’s reply was, 'Ah, but if you work by heart, you will repeat yourself.'^ Reply Report Haven't you seen the film of him *working* a canvas?
      • Jackson Pollock's name hidden in his painting Mural? Boing Boing 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.boingboing.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ I always find that whole "If you don't like my work, go F yourself" posture as about as disingenuo us as you can get.
      • Anyone watch the Jackson Pollock bio on Ovation? - Ovation TV Community Forum - Ovation TV Message Board - Make Life Creative 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC community.ovationtv.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ Reply Report Ah, Spencercat, I loved Al Hirschfeld's work.
      • Jackson Pollock's name hidden in his painting Mural? Boing Boing 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.boingboing.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      To which Jackson did not reply at all." .The meeting between Pollock and Hofmann took place in 1942.
  • ..people have always frightened and bored me, consequently I have been within my own shell..^ My own work and sensibility, though, has always had a softer focus.
    • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

    ^ In his book Rodman notes that the interview took place in the Springs "eight weeks before Pollock's tragic death in August 1956."
    • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

    .(1929)
    • as quoted in Abstract Expressionism David Anfam, Thames and Hudson Ltd London, 1990, p.^ Thames and Hudson, Ltd., 1959-1964, 1969 .
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      .30
  • My work with Benton was important as something against which to react very strongly, later on; in this, it was better to have worked with him than with a less resistant personality who would have provided a much less strong opposition.^ It is much less art than it is marketing.
    • #$&% Jackson Pollock - Raise the Hammer 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.raisethehammer.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Wasserman is a Brooklyn man who believed the painting he purchased for less than $100 at a Manhattan frame shop in 1954 was an authentic Pollock.
    • Exclusive: Mystery painting by Jackson Pollock? | Scottsdale Arizona News - Scottsdale News - Scottsdale AZ news | eastvalleytribune.com 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.eastvalleytribune.com [Source type: News]

    ^ The connection to a fingerprint from a paint can from Pollock's studio as well as to an undisputed work by him is very strong evidence.

    .At the same time Benton introduced me to Renaissance art.^ At the same time, if the example of past crises holds true, artists can also take over the factory, make the art industry their own.
    • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

    (on his former teacher Benton)
    • Art and Architecture Vol. 61 no. .2, February 1944; as quoted in Abstract Expressionism: Creators and Critics, p.^ This show amounts to Abstract Expressionism's critical comeback.
      • Haber's Art Reviews: Jackson Pollock at the Modern 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.haberarts.com [Source type: Original source]

      137, ed. .Clifford Ross, Abrahams Publishers, New York 1990
  • ..I have a definite feeling for the West, the vast horizontality of the land, for instance..^ NEW LOCATION~~ Winkleman Gallery 621 West 27th Street New York, NY 10001 .

    ^ Sandler is the author, among many other books, of what is still taken by many to be the definitive account of the New York School, The Triumph of American Painting: A History of Abstract Expressionism.
    • Irving Sandler on Abstract Expressionism and the Cold War 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artcritical.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ "I ran into Jackson Pollock less than a week after returning to New York from Taliesin West.
    • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

    ..I have always been very impressed with the plastic qualities of American Indian art. The Indians have the true painter’s approach in their capacity to get hold of appropriate images, and in their understanding of what constitutes painterly subject-matter. Their colour is essentially Western, their vision has the basic universality of all real art. .Some people find references to American Indian art and calligraphy in parts of my pictures.^ I was discouraged by the various people connected with this painting about my chances of finding any fingerprints there.

    ^ During my 15 years of research on the Pollock myth...one day I decided to try and find what it was that make people so goofy about his work.
    • #$&% Jackson Pollock - Raise the Hammer 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.raisethehammer.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Revision 4: Added Part IV with new findings on paint media, independent confirmation of fingerprint comparison, and references to media coverage.

    That wasn’t intentional; probably (it) was the result of early memories and enthusiasm.
    • Art and Architecture Vol. 61 no. .2, February 1944; as quoted in Twentieth-century American painting, Gail Levin, The Thyssen-Bornemisza collection.^ Feeley’s abstract works with their bright colors, simple repetitive forms and symmetrical compositions occupy an important place in the history of twentieth-century American art.
      • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

      London, 1987, p. .267
  • I accept the fact that the important painting of the last hundred years was done in France.^ By painting himself years younger, the victim of a father Pollock in fact hardly knew, he combines evasion with a severe case of self-dramatization.
    • Haber's Art Reviews: Jackson Pollock at the Modern 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.haberarts.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Most of what I say to people these days about what has happened in painting over last 120 years has been some version of what I heard from Kimmelman.
    • Anyone watch the Jackson Pollock bio on Ovation? - Ovation TV Community Forum - Ovation TV Message Board - Make Life Creative 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC community.ovationtv.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Paint like today is your last day on Earth...Happy New Year to my WC family!!
    • Nov 09 Artist of the Month: Jackson Pollock - Page 4 - WetCanvas 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.wetcanvas.com [Source type: General]

    .American painters have generally missed the point of modern painting from beginning to end..^ Museum of Modern Art, "New American Painting," 1958-1959 .
    • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

    ^ Has anybody thought to question how this painting ended up in a thrift store to begin with?

    ..Thus the fact that good .European moderns (European artists who lived in the U.S. because of the Nazi-regime, fh) are now here is very important, for they bring with them an understanding of the problems of modern painting.^ He paints so poorly at first because he cannot see the outside world well enough—and he never understands why he should.
    • Haber's Art Reviews: Jackson Pollock at the Modern 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.haberarts.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In the film, there is an art lawyer interviewed who says something to the effect that the art world does not understand fingerprints and that they are being asked to understand something they are not familiar with.

    ^ Karmel, who co-curated a Pollock retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in 1998, would not comment on painting F/ll's attributes in the Pollock Raisonne.
    • Exclusive: Mystery painting by Jackson Pollock? | Scottsdale Arizona News - Scottsdale News - Scottsdale AZ news | eastvalleytribune.com 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.eastvalleytribune.com [Source type: News]

    I am particularly impressed with their concept of the source of art being the unconscious. .These idea interests me more than these specific artists do, for the two artists I admire most, Picasso and Miró, are still abroad.^ More so than most Pollock's.
    • Jackson Pollock's name hidden in his painting Mural? Boing Boing 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.boingboing.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ On each page he would line off six squares or diamonds and, in these little spaces barely more than a square inch or two in size, work out in serial fashion the ideas that would later become paintings.
    • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

    ^ It's more intense at times than now, but certain events and stories still arise to drive the point home that lasting peace has yet to arrive.

    • Art and Architecture Vol. 61 no. .2, February 1944; as quoted in Abstract Expressionism: Creators and Critics, p.^ This show amounts to Abstract Expressionism's critical comeback.
      • Haber's Art Reviews: Jackson Pollock at the Modern 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.haberarts.com [Source type: Original source]

      138, ed. .Clifford Ross, Abrahams Publishers, New York, 1990
  • The idea of an isolated American painting, so popular in this country during the thirties, seems absurd to me, just as the idea of a purely American mathematics or physics would seem absurd..^ Greenberg, on the other hand, told The New York Times, Wasserman's painting "struck me as being Pollock's mind andhand."
    • Exclusive: Mystery painting by Jackson Pollock? | Scottsdale Arizona News - Scottsdale News - Scottsdale AZ news | eastvalleytribune.com 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.eastvalleytribune.com [Source type: News]

    ^ Museum of Modern Art, "New American Painting," 1958-1959 .
    • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

    ^ They should be given the favorite American word of 'projects,' and seem intended for abandonment as the frontier advances, for are they not shock troops in the American invasion of painting?"
    • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

    ..And in another sense, the problem doesn’t exist at all; or, if it did, would solve itself: .An American is an American and his painting would naturally be qualified by the fact, whether he wills or not.^ He would have checked into whether the canvas was the same type that was used in real Pollock paintings.
    • A Jackson Pollock Painting for $5? Art World Objects - Page 2 - Blogcritics Culture 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC blogcritics.org [Source type: General]

    .But the basic problems of contemporary painting are independent of any one country.^ One problem that I have with monochrome painting in general is that all of the action seems to be relegated to the margins.
    • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

    • Art and Architecture Vol. 61, no. .2, February 1944; as quoted in Abstract Expressionism: Creators and Critics, p.^ This show amounts to Abstract Expressionism's critical comeback.
      • Haber's Art Reviews: Jackson Pollock at the Modern 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.haberarts.com [Source type: Original source]

      138, ed. .Clifford Ross, Abrahams Publishers, New York, 1990
  • It came into existence because I had to paint it.^ Greenberg, on the other hand, told The New York Times, Wasserman's painting "struck me as being Pollock's mind andhand."
    • Exclusive: Mystery painting by Jackson Pollock? | Scottsdale Arizona News - Scottsdale News - Scottsdale AZ news | eastvalleytribune.com 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.eastvalleytribune.com [Source type: News]

    ^ In 1992, Thaw told The New York Times "the Wasserman painting misses by a mile ...
    • Exclusive: Mystery painting by Jackson Pollock? | Scottsdale Arizona News - Scottsdale News - Scottsdale AZ news | eastvalleytribune.com 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.eastvalleytribune.com [Source type: News]

    ^ Another example: After a quotation from the New York Times story, he states: "...will make scholars and the art market acknowledge her painting as authentic."
    • A Jackson Pollock Painting for $5? Art World Objects - Blogcritics Culture 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC blogcritics.org [Source type: General]

    .Any attempt on my part to say something about it, to attempt explanation of the inexplicable, could only destroy it.^ It attempted something, perhaps to copy Pollock, but in the end it gave something different and I'm curious about that.

    ^ However, there's something powerfully "sexy" about Pollock's paintings in my mind...
    • Anyone watch the Jackson Pollock bio on Ovation? - Ovation TV Community Forum - Ovation TV Message Board - Make Life Creative 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC community.ovationtv.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ It's only a couple of years old and is called My Kid Could Have Painted That.
    • Anyone watch the Jackson Pollock bio on Ovation? - Ovation TV Community Forum - Ovation TV Message Board - Make Life Creative 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC community.ovationtv.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .(1947, on his painting ‘She wolf’)
    • as quoted in Abstract Expressionism, David Anfam, Thames and Hudson Ltd London, 1990, p.^ The contact with artists like Brice Marden, Robert Motherwell and Jackson Pollock has had significant influence on his painting in the context of abstract expressionism.
      • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

      .87
  • My painting does not come from the easel.^ My painting does not come from the easel.

    ^ Paper passively resists its traces, and Pollock does not linger long enough on a sheet to achieve the density of those traces in my favorite paintings.
    • Haber's Art Reviews: Jackson Pollock at the Modern 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.haberarts.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ My considerations in examining the collected evidence were based on the sole condition that the prints must come from surfaces that had to do with the painting process and be of substances that were used in the painting process i.e.

    .I hardly ever stretch my canvas before painting.^ I hardly ever stretch a canvas before painting.

    ^ I hardly ever stretch the canvas before painting .
    • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

    ^ If a reclusive prickly drunk can make art by splashing canvas with paint then why can't I call my McD's fries art once I put my ketchup on them?
    • #$&% Jackson Pollock - Raise the Hammer 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.raisethehammer.org [Source type: General]

    I prefer to tack the unstretched canvas to the hard wall or the floor. .I need the resistance of a hard surface.^ I need the resistance of a hard surface.

    .On the floor I am more at ease.^ On the floor I am more at ease.
    • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

    .I feel nearer, more a part of the painting, since this way I can walk around it, work from the four sides and literally be in the painting.^ My own work centers around paint samples from Pollock's studio floor.

    ^ Since Pollock was known to work alone and had no assistants or pupils, the probability of the fingerprint on the blue paint can being Pollocks is very high.

    ^ Also, with no other known evidence of the painting, there needs to be more than 1 thing that is correct with the work.
    • The Reeler > Features > The $50 Million Question 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.thereeler.com [Source type: General]

    This is akin to the method of the Indian sand painters of the West.
    • Possibilities Vol. 1, no 1, winter 1947-48, p. .79; as quoted in Quoted in "Jackson Pollock: is he the greatest living painter in the United States?"^ Born in Codi, WY (US) It was Jackson Pollock who blazed an astonishing trail for the other Abstract Expressionist painters to follow.
      • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]
      • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]

      ^ By MikeStreet Artist 3 months ago 306 Posts MikeStree t's stats: Artist 32155points Male Age: 57 Santa Monica , CA United States Re: Anyone watch the Jackson Pollock bio on Ovation?
      • Anyone watch the Jackson Pollock bio on Ovation? - Ovation TV Community Forum - Ovation TV Message Board - Make Life Creative 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC community.ovationtv.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ Pollock is often called one of America's greatest and most important painters and some of his work sells for over $100 million.
      • #$&% Jackson Pollock - Raise the Hammer 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.raisethehammer.org [Source type: General]

      Life (1949-08-08), pp. .42-45
  • Energy and motion made visible – memories arrested in space.^ Clippings, Reviews of Jackson Pollock: Energy Made Visible by B. H. Friedman, 1972-1973 .
    • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

    .(around 1948-‘49)
    • as quoted in Abstract Expressionism, David Anfam, Thames and Hudson Ltd London, 1990, p.^ Thames and Hudson, Ltd., 1959-1964, 1969 .
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      121
  • When I am in my painting, I am not aware of what I’m doing. It is only after a short of ‘get acquainted’ period that I see what I have been about. .I have no fears about making changes, destroying the image, etc., because the painting has a life of its own.^ JJ : To tell you the truth, I know less about this period of his life partly because I was barely walking at the time and partly because Ward talked about that time in his life less than others.
    • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

    ^ How can the viewer become enveloped in the color, or experience the “body-transfer” that the artist himself desires, if one’s own image is constantly reflected within the paint?
    • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

    ^ If you ask me, I would agree that Pollock's work is far from "each stroke can make or break a painting", but luckily thats not what his work is about.
    • Anyone watch the Jackson Pollock bio on Ovation? - Ovation TV Community Forum - Ovation TV Message Board - Make Life Creative 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC community.ovationtv.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .I try to let it come through.^ I try to let it come through.
    • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

    It is only when I lose contact with the painting that the result is a mess. .Otherwise there is pure harmony, an easy give and take, and the painting comes out well.^ In drawing, on the other hand, paint or ink does not cross the edge only because the paper gives out.
    • Haber's Art Reviews: Jackson Pollock at the Modern 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.haberarts.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Paint takes over from the priority of drawing temporally as well as formally, too, for Pollock improvised on canvas, without preparatory sketches.
    • Haber's Art Reviews: Jackson Pollock at the Modern 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.haberarts.com [Source type: Original source]

    • Possibilities, Vol. 1, no 1, winter 1947-48, p. .79; as quoted in Jackson Pollock, Elizabeth Frank, New York, 1983, p.^ Appraisal of Jackson Pollock Drawings, 1983 .
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      ^ Born Paul Jackson Pollock in Wyoming, he headed to California, but left before finishing high school to study at the Art Students League in New York.
      • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]
      • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]

      ^ Tuesday, August 7, 1956: Ruth Kligman tells Jackson Pollock she is going to New York for a few days.
      • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

      .68
  • Modern art to me is nothing more than the expression of contemporary aims of the age we’re living in..^ You're doing more than that.
    • Pollock Script - transcript from the screenplay and/or Ed Harris Jackson Pollock movie 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.script-o-rama.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ In 1956, at the age of 44, Jackson Pollock died the instant his head hit a tree and, just as quickly, his art was worth a lot more.
    • #$&% Jackson Pollock - Raise the Hammer 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.raisethehammer.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Nothing is more of a lie, a beautiful as it is, than a perfectly rendered perspective study.
    • Anyone watch the Jackson Pollock bio on Ovation? - Ovation TV Community Forum - Ovation TV Message Board - Make Life Creative 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC community.ovationtv.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ..All cultures have had means and techniques of expressing their immediate aims – the Chinese, the Renaissance, all cultures. The thing that interests me is that today painters do not have to go to a subject matter outside of themselves. .Most modern painters work from a different source, they work from within.^ Ward was certainly passionate about his job, but most of all, thought of himself as a painter and his work will be the focus of the exhibition at Metaphor.
    • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Ward never achieved fame or great fortune, but his work as a painter and participant in the artworld was a source of intense search, discovery, and joy for him.
    • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

    ^ (S.P., "About Art and Artists: Work of 12 Contemporary U.S. Painters and Sculptors at the Modern Museum," The New York Times (May 30, 1956)) .
    • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

    .
    • interview by William Wright, Summer 1950 (for broadcasting, but never used); as quoted in Abstract Expressionism: Creators and Critics, ed.^ Jackson Pollock Interview by William Wright, 1949 (audio cassette, not digitized) .
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      ^ Also found is a audio recording and transcript of a 1949 interview of Pollock by his neighbor William Wright.
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      ^ Biographical material includes artist statements and notes, a transcript of an interview with William Wright and the original audio recording, Pollock's birth certificate, and his passport.
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      Clifford Ross, Abrahams Publishers, New York 1990, p. .140
  • I think they (the public) should not look for, but look passively – and try to receive what the painting has to offer and not bring a subject matter or preconceived idea of what they are to be looking for..^ They should be given the favorite American word of 'projects,' and seem intended for abandonment as the frontier advances, for are they not shock troops in the American invasion of painting?"
    • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Still, I loved the idea that we had an artist in the family and felt a real kinship with him just from looking at his paintings.
    • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Anyone who says it doesn't look like Pollock paintings they have seen must have forgotten about no.5.

    .and I think the unconsciousness drives do mean a lot in looking at paintings.. .I think it should enjoyed just as music is enjoyed – after a while you may like it or you may not. But it doesn’t seem to be too serious. I like some flowers, and others, other flowers I don’t like. I think at least it gives – at least give it a chance. .
    • interview by William Wright, Summer 1950 (for broadcasting, but never used); as quoted in Abstract Expressionism: Creators and Critics, ed.^ Jackson Pollock Interview by William Wright, 1949 (audio cassette, not digitized) .
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      ^ Also found is a audio recording and transcript of a 1949 interview of Pollock by his neighbor William Wright.
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      ^ Biographical material includes artist statements and notes, a transcript of an interview with William Wright and the original audio recording, Pollock's birth certificate, and his passport.
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      .Clifford Ross, Abrahams Publishers, New York 1990, pp.^ New York Observer , November 9, 1998, pp.
      • Jackson Pollock Bibliography | Reviews of the 1998-99 MoMA and Tate Exhibit 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC research.moma.org [Source type: General]

      139-140,
  • The modern artist is living in a mechanical age and we have a mechanical means of representing objects in nature such as the camera and photograph. .The modern artist, it seems to me, is working and expressing an inner world – in other words – expressing the energy, the motion and the other inner forces..^ Although Varnedoe is forced, in the interest of time, to omit many artists and works that could have been included, he’s not working in art historical generalities.
    • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

    ^ It seems to me that they are asked, and in a sense answered, every time an artist makes an abstract work.
    • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Abstract Expressionism and Other Modern Works: The Muriel Kallis Steinberg Newman Collection in The Metropolitan Museum - The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY .
    • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]
    • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]

    ..the modern artist is working with space and time, and expressing his feelings rather than illustrating. .
    • interview by William Wright, Summer 1950 (for broadcasting, but never used); as quoted in Abstract Expressionism: Creators and Critics, ed.^ Jackson Pollock Interview by William Wright, 1949 (audio cassette, not digitized) .
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      ^ Also found is a audio recording and transcript of a 1949 interview of Pollock by his neighbor William Wright.
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      ^ Biographical material includes artist statements and notes, a transcript of an interview with William Wright and the original audio recording, Pollock's birth certificate, and his passport.
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      .Clifford Ross, Abrahams Publishers, New York 1990, pp.^ New York Observer , November 9, 1998, pp.
      • Jackson Pollock Bibliography | Reviews of the 1998-99 MoMA and Tate Exhibit 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC research.moma.org [Source type: General]

      .139-140
  • Well, method is, it seems to me, a natural growth out of a need, and from a need the modern artist has found new ways of expressing the world about him.^ I came across some sites about Milk Paint, which is just the stuff I need to paint the old dairy farm milk container I found when I was clearing out our shed for our move.
    • Jackson Pollock for Fun - Artspan Community 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artspan.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ By the way, your method of doing abstract expresionistic paintings, seems to have given a fresh meaning to the word "throwing" for art dictionaries.
    • Jackson Pollock for Fun - Artspan Community 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artspan.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Although his work is not as well known today, during his lifetime Feeley was at the center of the New York art world.
    • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

    .I happen to find ways that are different from the usual techniques, which seems a little strange at the moment, but I don’t think there’s anything very different about it.^ I remember see the gouges and indentations on the thick paper and thinking there was no way this would reproduce in any photo.
    • Anyone watch the Jackson Pollock bio on Ovation? - Ovation TV Community Forum - Ovation TV Message Board - Make Life Creative 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC community.ovationtv.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ There was very little time, however, to ponder characteristics even though by then I have memorized the entire print form Teri's Find .

    ^ I don't know any more about the film than he told me, but apparently the woman bought the painting as a gag gift for a friend, thinking it was the ugliest thing she could find, and the friend returned it to her.

    I paint on the floor and this isn’t unusual – the Orientals did that. .
    • interview by William Wright, Summer 1950 (for broadcasting, but never used); as quoted in Abstract Expressionism: Creators and Critics, ed.^ Jackson Pollock Interview by William Wright, 1949 (audio cassette, not digitized) .
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      ^ Also found is a audio recording and transcript of a 1949 interview of Pollock by his neighbor William Wright.
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      ^ Biographical material includes artist statements and notes, a transcript of an interview with William Wright and the original audio recording, Pollock's birth certificate, and his passport.
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      .Clifford Ross, Abrahams Publishers, New York 1990, pp.^ New York Observer , November 9, 1998, pp.
      • Jackson Pollock Bibliography | Reviews of the 1998-99 MoMA and Tate Exhibit 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC research.moma.org [Source type: General]

      .142-143
  • Most of the paint I use is a liquid, flowing kind of paint.^ Most of the paint I use is a liquid flowing kind of paint.
    • Pollock Script - transcript from the screenplay and/or Ed Harris Jackson Pollock movie 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.script-o-rama.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ It is about as difficult as it would be to describe the myriad physical forces acting on the flowing paint in this most radical artistic process.

    ^ It’s not typical of the kind of painting space Pollock used, which tended to be more open.

    .The brushes I use are more a sticks rather than brushes – the brush doesn’t touch the surface on the canvas, it’s just above..^ The brushes I use are used more as sticks.
    • Pollock Script - transcript from the screenplay and/or Ed Harris Jackson Pollock movie 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.script-o-rama.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ The brush doesn't actually touch the canvas...
    • Pollock Script - transcript from the screenplay and/or Ed Harris Jackson Pollock movie 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.script-o-rama.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ He used his brushes as sticks to drip paint, and the brush never touched the canvas.
    • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

    ..(so) I am able to be more free and to have greater freedom and move about the canvas, with greater ease. .
    • interview by William Wright, Summer 1950 (for broadcasting, but never used); as quoted in Abstract Expressionism: Creators and Critics, ed.^ Jackson Pollock Interview by William Wright, 1949 (audio cassette, not digitized) .
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      ^ Also found is a audio recording and transcript of a 1949 interview of Pollock by his neighbor William Wright.
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      ^ Biographical material includes artist statements and notes, a transcript of an interview with William Wright and the original audio recording, Pollock's birth certificate, and his passport.
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      Clifford Ross, Abrahams Publishers, New York 1990, p. .144
  • ..with experience it seems to be possible to control the flow of paint, to a great extent, and I don’t use – I don’t use the accident – ‘cause I deny the accident..^ Vial 7 is water used and 8 contains the swab used to remove contamination from the painting for possible later testing.

    ^ If these paintings are principally about a color experience, it seems to me that they are fundamentally flawed in that they have highly-reflective, glossy surfaces.
    • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

    ^ A great richness of colour and dynamics are present on the miniature scale caused by the patterns of marbling of flowing enamel blending into another [xxix] .

    ..it’s quite different from working, say, from a still life where you set up objects and work directly from them. I do have a general notion of what I’m about and what the results will be. .I approach painting in the same sense as one approaches drawing, that is, it’s direct.^ The artist's legacy is forever determined by the documents left behind by Hans Namuth, which provided the public with a sense of the intense physicality of Pollock's approach to painting.
    • Jackson Pollock oil painting reproduction biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC theworldsartist.com [Source type: General]

    ^ One layer is the white drawing and the top layer is the greenish gray which was painted over everything else, last after all the other paint had dried.

    .
    • interview by William Wright, Summer 1950 (for broadcasting, but never used); as quoted in Abstract Expressionism: Creators and Critics, ed.^ Jackson Pollock Interview by William Wright, 1949 (audio cassette, not digitized) .
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      ^ Also found is a audio recording and transcript of a 1949 interview of Pollock by his neighbor William Wright.
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      ^ Biographical material includes artist statements and notes, a transcript of an interview with William Wright and the original audio recording, Pollock's birth certificate, and his passport.
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      Clifford Ross, Abrahams Publishers, New York 1990, p. .144
  • I don’t work from drawings and colour sketches into a final painting.^ Both paintings carry final traces of a predominant colour.

    ^ There is like 2 paintings in that work, the background and some drawing above it.

    ^ In 2000, she sent the work to the International Foundation for Art Research for authentication; they returned it with a document stating they don't believe the painting to be a Pollock.
    • The Reeler > Features > The $50 Million Question 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.thereeler.com [Source type: General]

    .Painting, I think, today – the more immediate, the more direct – the greater the possibilities of making a direct – of making a statement.^ I think that it really makes people realize that just splattering paint around is fine for decoration, but may not necesserily have a contemporary place anymore.
    • Anyone watch the Jackson Pollock bio on Ovation? - Ovation TV Community Forum - Ovation TV Message Board - Make Life Creative 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC community.ovationtv.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ I prefer art by artists who think every stroke of the brush can make or break a painting.
    • Anyone watch the Jackson Pollock bio on Ovation? - Ovation TV Community Forum - Ovation TV Message Board - Make Life Creative 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC community.ovationtv.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ The miscibility of acrylic with commercial paints like Duco would make it a new possibility for Pollock to explore.

    .
    • interview by William Wright, Summer 1950 (for broadcasting, but never used); as quoted in Abstract Expressionism: Creators and Critics, ed.^ Jackson Pollock Interview by William Wright, 1949 (audio cassette, not digitized) .
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      ^ Also found is a audio recording and transcript of a 1949 interview of Pollock by his neighbor William Wright.
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      ^ Biographical material includes artist statements and notes, a transcript of an interview with William Wright and the original audio recording, Pollock's birth certificate, and his passport.
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      Clifford Ross, Abrahams Publishers, New York 1990, p. .144
  • Well, painting today certainly seems very vibrant, very alive, very exiting.^ She's a woman with a painting that very well might be a Jackson Pollock (or at the very least a good fake).

    .Five or six of my contemporaries around New York are doing very vital work, and the direction that painting seems to be taken here – is – away from the easel – into some sort, some kind of wall, wall painting...^ From 1938 to 1942 Pollock existed on the money he received from painting murals for the WPA Federal Arts Project and his work began to be included in exhibitions in New York as well as the mid-west and west coast.
    • Jackson Pollock oil painting reproduction biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC theworldsartist.com [Source type: General]

    ^ In the winter of 1947-48, Pollock published a commentary in an avant-garde periodical, called Possibilities, addressing his new method: "My painting does not come from the easel.
    • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Of his time with Benton, Pollock later told the New Yorker that his teacher "drove his kind of realism at me so hard I bounced right into non-objective painting."
    • Jackson Pollock oil painting reproduction biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC theworldsartist.com [Source type: General]

    .
    • interview by William Wright, Summer 1950 (for broadcasting, but never used); as quoted in Abstract Expressionism: Creators and Critics, ed.^ Jackson Pollock Interview by William Wright, 1949 (audio cassette, not digitized) .
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      ^ Also found is a audio recording and transcript of a 1949 interview of Pollock by his neighbor William Wright.
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      ^ Biographical material includes artist statements and notes, a transcript of an interview with William Wright and the original audio recording, Pollock's birth certificate, and his passport.
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      Clifford Ross, Abrahams Publishers, New York 1990, p. .144
  • Naturally, the result is the thing (in painting, fh) and it doesn’t make much difference how the paint is put on as long as something has been said.^ In the 1950’s four highly different approaches to painting might be said to have surfaced represented by Jackson Pollock, Rothko, Kline and Clifford Still.
    • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

    ^ But he said there are a number of technical factors Pollock scholars use to determine if a Pollock work is authentic or not, including how the paint was laid down and what sequence the paint is in.
    • Exclusive: Mystery painting by Jackson Pollock? | Scottsdale Arizona News - Scottsdale News - Scottsdale AZ news | eastvalleytribune.com 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.eastvalleytribune.com [Source type: News]

    ^ What’s most interesting about much of Marioni’s painting doesn’t always jibe with the official party line anyway.
    • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

    .Technique is just a means of arriving at a statement.^ It was nearly impossible for critics to ignore the physicality of Pollock's methods, but the artist saw these techniques as nothing more than the means through which he arrived at a particular aesthetic statement.
    • Jackson Pollock oil painting reproduction biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC theworldsartist.com [Source type: General]

    .
    • interview by William Wright, Summer 1950 (for broadcasting, but never used); as quoted in Abstract Expressionism: Creators and Critics, ed.^ Jackson Pollock Interview by William Wright, 1949 (audio cassette, not digitized) .
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      ^ Also found is a audio recording and transcript of a 1949 interview of Pollock by his neighbor William Wright.
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      ^ Biographical material includes artist statements and notes, a transcript of an interview with William Wright and the original audio recording, Pollock's birth certificate, and his passport.
      • Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner papers, Series 1: Jackson Pollock papers and Lee Krasner papers about Jackson Pollock - Collections Online - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.aaa.si.edu [Source type: General]

      Clifford Ross, Abrahams Publishers, New York 1990, p. 145
  • Abstract painting is abstract. It confronts you. .There was a reviewer a while back who wrote that my pictures didn’t have any beginning or any end.^ About 3 years ago, my mom went back to the location of the store but it was no longer there.

    He didn’t meant it as a compliment, but it was. It was a fine compliment. Only he didn’t know it. .
    • "Unframed Space," interview with Berton Roueché, The New Yorker (1950-08-05),; as quoted in The Grove Book of Art Writing: Brilliant Words on Art from Pliny the Elder to Damien Hirst, ed.^ "Der Mut der frühen Jahre: Das New Yorker Museum of Modern Art zeigt eine grosse Retrospektive des Malers Jackson Pollock."
      • Jackson Pollock Bibliography | Reviews of the 1998-99 MoMA and Tate Exhibit 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC research.moma.org [Source type: General]

      ^ Michael Brennan is a New York painter who writes on art.
      • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

      ^ Beat Culture and the New America: 1950-1965 - Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN .
      • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]
      • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]

      Martin Gayford and Karen Wright [Grove Press, 2000, ISBN 0-802-13720-2], p. .546
  • I’ve had a period of drawing on canvas in black – with some of my early images coming thru -, think the non-objectivists will find them disturbing – and the kids who think it simple to splash a 'Pollock' out.^ In the winter of 1947-48, Pollock published a commentary in an avant-garde periodical, called Possibilities, addressing his new method: "My painting does not come from the easel.
    • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

    ^ I think another factor which comes into play is Pollock’s earlier paintings, in particular the paintings from the 40’s that lead up to the drip paintings.

    ^ I still think that it should be possible to find paint on the floor of Pollocks studio which expert chemists could prove are identical in batch to the paint used on hers...
    • The Reeler > Features > The $50 Million Question 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.thereeler.com [Source type: General]

    • letter to Alfonso Ossorio and Edward Dragon, 1951; as quoted in "Abstract Expressionism", David Anfam, Thames and Hudson Ltd London, 1990, p. .175
  • The important thing is that Clyff Still (Clyfford Still, fh) – you know his work?^ As you know during the summer of 2007, I had just finished preparing work ...
    • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Later in the interview Pollock comments that "The important thing is that Cliff [Clyfford] Still...
    • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

    – and [[Mar .Rothko|Rothko, and I – we’ve changed the nature of painting..^ Rothko, and I - we've changed the nature of painting."
    • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

    ..I don’t mean there aren’t any other good painters. .Bill (Willem de Kooning,fh) is a good painter, but he’s a "French" painter.^ Willem de Kooning .
    • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]
    • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]

    ^ The bright young proconsuls of the advance guard, Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning, added to this pattern of approach a breathtaking fervency and single-mindedness...
    • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

    ^ (CW84) When Rodman asks him why he left out de Kooning, Pollock responds, "I don't mean there aren't any other good painters.
    • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

    .I told him so, the last time I saw him after his last show..^ I told him so, the last time I saw him, after his last show...
    • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Rothko saw him in his office for the first time in November 1956 and then again in February 1957, October 1957, May 1958, November 1958, December 1958, May 1959 and June 1959.
    • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

    ^ And [Theodoros] Stamos, who saw quite a lot of him at that time, felt that he was definitely not all there."
    • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

    ..all those pictures in his last show start with an image. .You can see it even though he’s covered it up, or tried to..^ You can see it even though he's covered it up, or tried to...
    • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

    ^ The painting above is rough and disturbing and you can see the person was trying too much (or maybe not enough?

    ..Style – that’s the French part of it. .He has to cover it up with style..^ He has to cover it up with style."
    • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

    .
    • "Conversations with Artists", by Seldon Rodman, New York, Capricorn Books, 1961, pp.^ It was a three-fold folio containing 8 1/2 x 11 inch reproductions of work recently exhibited in New York, accompanied by statements from the artists.
      • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

      ^ What I do know is that he moved to New York in 1952, and began his life as an artist in earnest.
      • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

      ^ Lynne Harlow is a New York City-based artist.
      • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

      84-85
  • The thing that interests me is that today painters do not have to go to a subject-matter outside themselves. .Modern painters work in a different way.^ (S.P., "About Art and Artists: Work of 12 Contemporary U.S. Painters and Sculptors at the Modern Museum," The New York Times (May 30, 1956)) .
    • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

    They work from within. (1951, radio interview)
    • as quoted in "Lives of the great twentieth century artists", Edward Lucie-Smith, London, 1986, p. .263
  • I don’t care for 'abstract expressionism'..^ 'I don't care for 'Abstract Expressionism,' he said, 'and it's certainly not 'nonobjective,' and not 'nonrepresentational' either.
    • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Jackson Pollock commented that he didn't care for the label of "Abstract Expressionism" (or "nonobjective" or nonrepresentational") in an interview with Selden Rodman for the book Conversations with Artists .
    • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

    ..and it is certainly not ‘non-objective’, and not ‘non-representational’ either. .I’m very representational some of the time, and a little all of the time.^ There was very little time, however, to ponder characteristics even though by then I have memorized the entire print form Teri's Find .

    .But when you’re painting out of your consciousness, figures are bound to emerge.^ But when you're painting out of your unconscious, figures are bound to emerge.
    • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

    ^ You're painting something.
    • Pollock Script - transcript from the screenplay and/or Ed Harris Jackson Pollock movie 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.script-o-rama.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ What you're doing out there is better than anything...
    • Pollock Script - transcript from the screenplay and/or Ed Harris Jackson Pollock movie 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.script-o-rama.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .We’re all of us influenced by Freud, I guess.^ We're all of us influenced by Freud, I guess.
    • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

    I’ve been a Jungian for a long time.. ..Painting is a state of being.. ..Painting is self-discovery. Every good artist paints what he is. .
    • "Conversations with Artists", by Seldon Rodman, New York, Capricorn Books, 1961, pp.^ It was a three-fold folio containing 8 1/2 x 11 inch reproductions of work recently exhibited in New York, accompanied by statements from the artists.
      • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

      ^ What I do know is that he moved to New York in 1952, and began his life as an artist in earnest.
      • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

      ^ Lynne Harlow is a New York City-based artist.
      • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

      84-85
  • My concern is with the rhythms of nature... I work inside out, like nature. .
    • Quoted in Leonhard Emmerling, Jackson Pollock: 1912-1956 (Taschen, 2003, ISBN 3-822-82132-2), p.^ Lot 33: Jackson Pollock (1912-1956) .
      • Jackson Pollock [1912-1956]: Auction Price Results - Artfact 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfact.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      ^ Tuesday, August 7, 1956: Ruth Kligman tells Jackson Pollock she is going to New York for a few days.
      • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

      ^ Lot 28: Jackson Pollock (1912-1956) .
      • Jackson Pollock [1912-1956]: Auction Price Results - Artfact 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfact.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

      48

Quotes about Pollock

  • He (Jackson Pollock) has broken the ice. .(Willem de Kooning's comment on Pollock’s drip paintings, shown for the very first time at Betty Parsons Gallery, in New York 1948, fh)
    • as quoted in Abstract Expressionism, David Anfam, Thames and Hudson Ltd London, 1990, p.^ Willem de Kooning .
      • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]
      • Jackson Pollock - Biography 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.artfacts.net [Source type: News]

      ^ When the first set of these paintings was exhibited at the Betty Parsons Gallery in 1948 it was a sensation and a sell out.
      • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

      ^ Time (New York) 152, no.
      • Jackson Pollock Bibliography | Reviews of the 1998-99 MoMA and Tate Exhibit 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC research.moma.org [Source type: General]

      130
  • .A dripping wet canvas covered the entire floor.^ An imprint of canvas left in a drip of paint on the floor of the Pollock-Krasner House.

    ... .There was complete silence.^ There was complete silence… Pollock looked at the painting .
    • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

    ... .Pollock looked at the painting.^ The song "Going Down" also features the cryptic line "Yeah, she look like a painting / Jackson Pollock's, Number 5."
    • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

    ^ While that finding may look promising, Pollock experts such as Karmel say the paints Pollock used were common and widely used by many artists.
    • Exclusive: Mystery painting by Jackson Pollock? | Scottsdale Arizona News - Scottsdale News - Scottsdale AZ news | eastvalleytribune.com 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.eastvalleytribune.com [Source type: News]

    ^ There was complete silence… Pollock looked at the painting .
    • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

    .Then, unexpectedly, he picked up can and paint brush and started to move around the canvas.^ Then, unexpectedly, he picked up can and paint brush and started to move around the canvas.
    • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Flinging, dripping, pouring, spattering - he would energetically move around the canvas, almost like a dance - and would not stop until he saw what he wanted to see.
    • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

    ^ In this process he moved away from figurative art, and changed the Western tradition of using an easel and brush, as well as moving away from use only of the hand and wrist - as he used his whole body to paint.
    • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

    .It was as if he suddenly realized the painting was not finished.^ It was as if he suddenly realized the painting was not finished.
    • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

    .His movements, slow at first, gradually became faster and more dance like as he flung black, white, and rust colored paint onto the canvas.^ From the earliest black and white diamonds, Ward was interested in the primary vertical structure of the form, and its reinforced cruciform symmetry lent itself to the punchy diagrammatic nature of some of his more mandala-like paintings, especially in later diamond works from the 80s and 90s.
    • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

    ^ What often appears black at first glance is often two or more distinct color glazes that produce the effect of black in their overlay.
    • MINUS SPACE reductive art » Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.minusspace.com [Source type: General]

    ^ If the paint matches his paint-soaked floor, even more likely.
    • The Reeler > Features > The $50 Million Question 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.thereeler.com [Source type: General]

    .He completely forgot that Lee and I were there; he did not seem to hear the click of the camera shutter.^ He completely forgot that Lee and I were there; he did not seem to hear the click of the camera shutter… My photography session lasted as long as he kept painting , perhaps half an hour.
    • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

    ... .My photography session lasted as long as he kept painting, perhaps half an hour.^ He completely forgot that Lee and I were there; he did not seem to hear the click of the camera shutter… My photography session lasted as long as he kept painting , perhaps half an hour.
    • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Paint like today is your last day on Earth...Happy New Year to my WC family!!
    • Nov 09 Artist of the Month: Jackson Pollock - Page 4 - WetCanvas 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.wetcanvas.com [Source type: General]

    .In all that time, Pollock did not stop.^ In all that time, Pollock did not stop.
    • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Did you people eat like this all the time?
    • Pollock Script - transcript from the screenplay and/or Ed Harris Jackson Pollock movie 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.script-o-rama.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .How could one keep up this level of activity?^ How could one keep up this level of activity?
    • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Although in Ruth's account she maintains that she was the one who wanted to end the relationship, she also recounts how devastated she was by the break-up.
    • Jackson Pollock 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC warholstars.org [Source type: General]

    Finally, he said "This is it." .
    • Hans Namuth who had arranged to photograph Pollock painting, on Pollock suddenly resuming work on the painting One: No.^ Namuth wanted to photograph and film Pollock at work, painting .
      • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

      ^ An earlier ten-minute documentary Jackson Pollock (1951) was directed by Hans Namuth and had music by Morton Feldman.
      • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

      ^ Pollock promised to start a new painting especially for the photographic session, but when Namuth arrived, Pollock apologized and told him the painting was finished.
      • Jackson Pollock Biography and Artwork - MetroArtWork 9 January 2010 17:18 UTC www.metroartwork.com [Source type: General]

      31, 1950
      after apologizing for having finished it. Quoted in Pollock Painting (1980), and in "The Photos That Changed Pollock's Life" by Sarah Boxer in The New York Times (15 December 1998)

External links

.
Wikipedia
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Simple English

[[File:|thumb|right|200px|Jackson Pollock stone in Green River Cemetery, Springs, New York]]

Jackson Pollock (January 28, 1912 – August 11, 1956) was an American painter. He became famous for painting in the abstract expressionist style. Pollock's most famous paintings were made by dripping and splashing paint on a large canvas. His nickname was Jack the Dripper! Because of the method, this style is often called action painting. Pollock was helped by his wife, artist Lee Krasner, and his style was very new at the time.

Pollock was bitter, and had serious drinking problems. He was killed in a car crash at the age of 44 in 1956. His paintings are in museums all over the world, and his work is rated very highly. Pollock has been the subject of many movies because of his interesting life. The most famous was a short documentary film directed by Hans Namuth in 1951, and the movie about his life called Pollock, made by and starring actor Ed Harris.

The unique technique

Pollock was introduced to the use of liquid paint in 1936 at an experimental workshop operated in New York City by the Mexican muralist David Alfaro Siqueiros. He later used paint pouring as one of several techniques on canvases of the early 1940s, such as "Male and Female" and "Composition with Pouring I." After his move to Springs, New York, he began painting with his canvases laid out on the studio floor, and he developed what was later called his drip technique.

Pollock described this use of household paints, instead of artist’s paints, as "a natural growth out of a need".[1] He used hardened brushes, sticks, and even basting syringes as paint applicators. With this technique, Pollock was able to achieve a more immediate means of creating art, the paint now literally flowing from his chosen tool onto the canvas. By defying the convention of painting on an upright surface, he added a new dimension, literally, by being able to view and apply paint to his canvases from all directions.

Later, Pollock turned to synthetic resin-based paints called alkyd enamels, which, at that time, was a novel medium. In 1956, Time magazine called Pollock "Jack the Dripper" as a result of his unique painting style.[2]

"My painting does not come from the easel. I prefer to tack the unstretched canvas to the hard wall or the floor. I need the resistance of a hard surface. On the floor I am more at ease. I feel nearer, more part of the painting, since this way I can walk around it, work from the four sides and literally be in the painting".
"I continue to get further away from the usual painter's tools such as easel, palette, brushes, etc. I prefer sticks, trowels, knives and dripping fluid paint or a heavy impasto with sand, broken glass or other foreign matter added".
"When I am in my painting, I'm not aware of what I'm doing. It is only after a sort of 'get acquainted' period that I see what I have been about. I have no fear of making changes, destroying the image, etc., because the painting has a life of its own. I try to let it come through. It is only when I lose contact with the painting that the result is a mess. Otherwise there is pure harmony, an easy give and take, and the painting comes out well".

Influences on his dripping technique include the Mexican muralists and Surrealist automatism. Pollock denied "the accident"; he usually had an idea of how he wanted a particular piece to appear. His technique combined the movement of his body, over which he had control, the viscous flow of paint, the force of gravity, and the absorption of paint into the canvas. It was a mixture of controllable and uncontrollable factors. Flinging, dripping, pouring, and spattering, he would move energetically around the canvas, almost as if in a dance, and would not stop until he saw what he wanted to see.

World's most expensive painting

The world's highest price for a work of art is Jackson Pollock's No. 5, 1948, which was privately sold by Sotheby's for (price adjusted) $151.2 million dollars.[3]

References


Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 29, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on Jackson Pollock, which are similar to those in the above article.








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