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Jakob Sporrenberg (16 September 1902 - 6 December 1952) was a SS group commander and Lieutenant-General of police in Minsk, Russia and Lublin, Poland.

Contents

Biography

Jakob Sporrenberg was born on 16 September 1902 in Düsseldorf, Germany.

Sporrenberg joined the NSDAP in 1925. In 1929 he was appointed an SA officer and one year later joined the SS, rising to the rank of Brigadeführer in 1933. From 1941 to 1943 he was SS and Police Leader (SSPF) in Minsk.

In 1943 he was assigned to the staff of General Erich von dem Bach in Minsk to combat partisans.

Sporrenberg subsequently succeeded Odilo Globocnik as SS and Police Leader of Lublin, in the Generalgouvernemant of occupied Poland in August 1943. In this capacity, Sporrenberg organized the Operation "Harvest Festival" there.

In November 1944 Sporrenberg and several of his staff were redeployed to Norway where they were captured by British forces at the end of the war. Their interrogation shed much light on Globocnik's activities in Lublin, and one outcome of his interrogation was that he was removed from the PWIS Detachment (Norway) in Oslo and transferred to the MI19 interrogation centre in Kensington Palace Gardens, London, known as the "London Cage", for further questioning by the War Crimes Interrogation Unit. This established his participation in a number of war crimes committed in Poland and the Soviet Union.[1]

Sporrenberg was extradited to Poland in October 1946, and sentenced to death by a Polish court in Warsaw in 1950, the sentence being carried out on 6 December 1952 when he was executed by hanging.

Postwar

Sporrenberg has since been linked to the alleged German secret project Die Glocke by Polish writer Igor Witkowski, who claimed to have discovered the existence of Die Glocke from transcripts of an interrogation by Polish authorities of Sporrenberg.

Notes

  1. ^ Poprzeczny, Joseph (2004). Odilo Globocnik, Hitler's Man in the East. McFarland. p. 358. ISBN 0786416254. 

References

External links

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