The Full Wiki

James Edwin Thorold Rogers: Wikis

Advertisements

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

(Redirected to Thorold Rogers article)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Thorold Rogers caricature by Leslie Ward from Vanity Fair

James Edwin Thorold Rogers (1823 – 14 October 1890), known as Thorold Rogers, an English economist and Member of Parliament, was born at West Meon, Hampshire.[1] He deployed historical and statistical methods to analyze some of the key economic and social questions in Victorian England. As an advocate of free trade and social justice he distinguished himself from some others within the English Historical School.[2]

Contents

Formative years

Rogers was educated at King's College London and Magdalen Hall, Oxford. After taking a first-class degree in 1846, he received his MA in 1849 from Magdalen and was ordained. A High Church man, he was curate of St. Paul's in Oxford, and acted voluntarily as assistant curate at Headington from 1854 to 1858, until his views changed and he turned to politics.

For some time the classics were the chief field of his activity. He devoted himself to classical and philosophical tuition in Oxford with success, and his publications included an edition of Aristotle's Ethics (in 1865). Rogers was instrumental in obtaining the Clerical Disabilities Relief Act, of which he was the first beneficiary, becoming the first man to legally withdraw from his clerical vows in 1870.

Political economy

Simultaneously with these occupations he had been studying economics. He became the first Tooke Professor of Statistics and Economic Science at King's College London, from 1859 until his death. During this time he also held the Drummond professorship of political economy at All Souls College, Oxford between 1862 and 1867, when Bonamy Price was elected in his stead.[3][4] In this he became a friend and follower of Richard Cobden, an advocate for free trade, nonintervention in Europe and an end to imperial expansion, whom he met during his first tenure as Drummond professor. Rogers said of Cobden, "he knew that ... political economy ... was, or ought to be, eminently inductive, and that an economist without facts is like an engineer without materials or tools."[5] Rogers had a wealth of facts at his disposal: his most influential works were the 6-volume History of Agriculture and Prices in England from 1259 to 1795 and Six Centuries of Work and Wages.

He served as President of the first day of the 1875 Co-operative Congress.[6] He was Liberal Member of Parliament (MP) for Southwark 1880-85 and Bermondsey 1885-86. Rogers also lectured in political economy at Worcester College, Oxford in 1883 and was re-elected Drummond professor in 1888.

Works

Notes

  1. ^ http://socserv2.socsci.mcmaster.ca/~econ/ugcm/3ll3/rogers/ Sidney Lee, in Dictionary of National Biography: Index and Epitome, Macmillan. London: Smith, Elder, & Co. (1903).
  2. ^ http://cepa.newschool.edu/het/schools/enghist.htm The English Historical School.
  3. ^ http://oep.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/citation/28/3/364 N. B. DeMarchi, "On the Early Dangers of Being Too Political an Economist," Oxford Economic Papers v. 28 no. 3, pp. 364-380
  4. ^ http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0030-7653(197807)2%3A30%3A2%3C310%3ATPEPOR%3E2.0.CO%3B2-P Salim Rashid, "The Price-Rogers Election; Politics or Religion?" Oxford Economic Papers, New Series, Vol. 30, No. 2 (Jul., 1978), pp. 310-312
  5. ^ http://www.econlib.org/library/YPDBooks/Cobden/cbdSPP0.html Preface to Richard Cobden's Speeches on Questions of Public Policy, on line.
  6. ^ Congress Presidents 1869-2002, February 2002, http://archive.co-op.ac.uk/downloadFiles/congressPresidentstable.pdf, retrieved 2008-05-10  
  7. ^ http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Story_of_Nations_-_Holland Holland, on line.

References

External links

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Edward George Clarke
Marcus Beresford
Member of Parliament for Southwark
18801885
With: Arthur Cohen
Constituency abolished
New constituency Member of Parliament for Bermondsey
18851886
Succeeded by
Alfred Lafone
Advertisements

1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

JAMES EDWIN THOROLD ROGERS (1823-1890), English economist, was born at West Meon, Hampshire, in 1823. He was educated at King's College, London, and Magdalen Hall, Oxford. After taking a first-class degree in 1846, he was ordained, and was for a few years a curate in Oxford. Subsequently, however, he resigned his orders. For some time the classics were the chief field of his activity. He devoted himself a good deal to classical and philosophical tuition in Oxford with success, and his publications included an edition of Aristotle's Ethics (in 1865). Simultaneously with these occupations he had been diligently studying economics, with the result that in 1859 he was appointed professor of statistics and economic science at King's College, London, a post which he filled till his death. From 1862 to 1867 he also held the position of Drummond professor of political economy at Oxford. During that period he published (in 1866) the first two volumes of his History of Agriculture and Prices in England, dealing with the period 1259-1400, a minute and masterly record of the subject, and the work upon which his reputation mainly rests. Two more volumes (1401-1582) were published in 1882, a fifth and sixth (1583-1702) in 1887, and he left behind him at his death copious materials for a seventh and eighth. In 1868 he published a Manual of Political Economy, and in 1869 an edition of Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations. In 1875 he collected and edited the Protests of the Lords. An intimate acquaintance with Cobden and John Bright led Rogers to take an active part in politics: he represented Southwark in parliament from 1880 to 1885, and Bermondsey from 1885-86, as an advanced Liberal. In 1888, on the death of Professor Bonamy Price, who had succeeded him at Oxford as professor of political economy, he was re-elected to the post, and held it till his death. Previously (in 1883) he had been appointed lecturer in political economy at Worcester College, Oxford. His latter years were mainly spent at Oxford, where he died on the 12th of October 1890. He was celebrated as a caustic wit and humorist. Of his miscellaneous economic and historical writings, which were numerous, the most noteworthy is his Six Centuries of Work and Wages, published in 1884. As an economist, Thorold Rogers did much to promote the historical study of his subject. He was, however, apt to be guided too frequently by political prejudice, and the value of his work suffered from his aggressively contentious spirit.


<< Rogers

John Rogers (Preacher) >>


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message