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James Hamilton, Duke of Châtellerault and 2nd Earl of Arran
Born James Hamilton
circa 1516
Died January 22, 1575 (aged 59)
Title Duke of Châtellerault
2nd Earl of Arran
Predecessor James Hamilton, 1st Earl of Arran
Successor James Hamilton, 3rd Earl of Arran
Children James Hamilton, 3rd Earl of Arran
Parents James Hamilton, 1st Earl of Arran
Relatives Mary of Scotland, paternal grandmother

James Hamilton, Duke of Châtellerault and 2nd Earl of Arran, (circa 1516 – 22 January 1575) was a Scottish nobleman.

Biography

He was the eldest legitimate son of James Hamilton, 1st Earl of Arran.

Through his paternal grandmother Mary of Scotland, Hamilton was the great grandson of James II of Scotland. On the death of John Stewart, Duke of Albany in 1536, Arran became the next heir of the Kingdom of Scotland after the king's immediate family.

The children of the immediate royal family proved to be short-lived except the future Mary, Queen of Scots, so on the death of James V of Scotland in 1542 the Earl of Arran stood next in line to the Scottish throne after the baby Queen Mary, for whom he was appointed Regent.

Initially a Protestant and a member of the pro-English party, in 1543 he was involved in negotiating the marriage of the Queen of Scots to the infant Prince of Wales (the future Edward VI of England). Shortly after, however, he became a Catholic and joined the pro-French faction, consenting to the marriage of the Queen to the French Dauphin, later Francis II of France. In 1548, the Queen of Scots went to live in the French court. For his work on negotiating the marriage, Hamilton was created Duc de Châtellerault, and made a knight of the Order of Saint Michael.

In 1554, Arran surrendered the regency to Mary of Guise, Queen Mary's mother. Hamilton gave up the Regency on the condition that he would be next in line after Queen Mary, if she died childless. But Scottish succession had been secretly promised to France.

Hamilton changed allegiance again in 1559, joining the Protestant Lords of the Congregation to oppose the regency of Mary of Guise, and losing his French dukedom as a result. When Francis II of France died in 1560 Hamilton attempted, without success, to arrange for his son James to marry the young widowed Queen Mary.

His support swung between Mary and the Lords of the Congregation, depending on how he saw his advantage, but after Mary married Lord Darnley in 1565 he withdrew to his estates in France. In 1569, he returned to Scotland and was imprisoned until, in 1573, he agreed to recognize Mary's infant James as King of Scotland.

Children

Further reading

  • Franklin, David Byrd (1995). The Scottish Regency of the Earl of Arran: A Study in the Failure of Anglo-Scottish Relations. Edwin Mellen Press.
Scottish royalty
Preceded by
John Stewart, Duke of Albany
Heir to the Scottish throne
as heir presumptive

2 July 1536–22 May 1540
Succeeded by
James Stewart, Duke of Rothesay
Preceded by
James Stewart, Duke of Rothesay
Heir to the Scottish throne
as heir presumptive

April, 1541–8 December 1542
Succeeded by
Mary, Queen of Scots
Preceded by
Mary, Queen of Scots
Heir to the Scottish throne
as heir presumptive

14 December 1542–19 June 1566
Succeeded by
James Stuart, Duke of Rothesay
Preceded by
James Stuart, Duke of Rothesay
Heir to the Scottish throne
as heir presumptive

29 July 1567–22 January 1575
Succeeded by
James Hamilton, 3rd Earl of Arran
Peerage of Scotland
Preceded by
James Hamilton
Earl of Arran
1529–1575
Succeeded by
James Hamilton
French nobility
Vacant
Title last held by
Charles de Valois
Duke of Châtellerault
1548–1575
Vacant
Title next held by
Diane de France
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