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James Marvin Lockhart (born 1933)[1] is a U.S. historian specializing in the history of colonial Latin America. He is an expert in the study of historical sources in the Nahuatl language and the postcolonial Nahua people. He is professor emeritus at UCLA. He is the principal founder of the New Philology, a school of history built on the study of indigenous-language sources from colonial Mexico.

Works

A prolific scholar, his important works are many. A partial bibliography includes such titles as:

  • Nahuatl in the Middle Years: Language Contact Phenomena in Texts of the Colonial Period (with Frances Karttunen, Berkeley: Univ. of California Press, 1976),
  • Beyond the Codices: The Nahua View of Colonial Mexico (with Arthur J. O. Anderson and Frances Berdan, Berkeley: Univ. of California Press, 1976),
  • The Art of Nahuatl Speech: The Bancroft Dialogues (ed., with Frances Karttunen, Los Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center, 1987),
  • Nahuas and Spaniards: Postconquest Mexican History and Philology (Stanford: Stanford University Press; and Los Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center, 1991)
  • The Nahuas after the Conquest: A Social and Cultural History of the Indians of Central Mexico, Sixteenth through Eighteenth Centuries (Stanford: Stanford Univ. Press, 1992).
  • Grammar of the Mexican Language: With an Explanation of Its Adverbs,(1645), Horacio Carochi, James Lockhart (translator)(Stanford: Stanford Univ. Press, 2001).

Notes

  1. ^ Date information sourced from Library of Congress Authorities data, via corresponding WorldCat Identities linked authority file (LAF) .

External links

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James Marvin Lockhart (born April 8, 1933)[1] is a U.S. historian specializing in the history of colonial Latin America.

Born in Huntington, West Virginia, Lockhart attended West Virginia University (BA, 1956) and the University of Wisconsin–Madison (MA, 1962; PhD, 1967).[2] He is an expert in the study of historical sources in the Nahuatl language and the postcolonial Nahua people. He is professor emeritus at UCLA. He is the principal founder of the New Philology, a school of history built on the study of indigenous-language sources from colonial Mexico.

Works

  • Spanish Peru, 1532-1560 (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1968).
  • The Men of Cajamarca: A Social and Biographical Study of the First Conquerors of Peru (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1972).
  • Nahuatl in the Middle Years: Language Contact Phenomena in Texts of the Colonial Period (with Frances Karttunen, Berkeley: Univ. of California Press, 1976).
  • Beyond the Codices: The Nahua View of Colonial Mexico (with Arthur J. O. Anderson and Frances Berdan, Berkeley: Univ. of California Press, 1976).
  • The Art of Nahuatl Speech: The Bancroft Dialogues (ed., with Frances Karttunen, Los Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center, 1987).
  • Nahuas and Spaniards: Postconquest Mexican History and Philology (Stanford: Stanford University Press; and Los Angeles: UCLA Latin American Center, 1991)
  • The Nahuas after the Conquest: A Social and Cultural History of the Indians of Central Mexico, Sixteenth through Eighteenth Centuries (Stanford: Stanford Univ. Press, 1992).
  • Of things of the Indies : essays old and new in early Latin American history, Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1999).
  • Grammar of the Mexican Language: With an Explanation of Its Adverbs,(1645), Horacio Carochi, James Lockhart (translator)(Stanford: Stanford Univ. Press, 2001).

Notes

  1. ^ Date information sourced from Library of Congress Authorities data, via corresponding WorldCat Identities linked authority file (LAF) .
  2. ^ John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, Report of the President and the Treasurer (1977), p. 67.

External links


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