The Full Wiki

Janne Ahonen: Wikis

  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Janne Ahonen
4wiki ahonen janne.jpg
Personal information
Full name Janne Petteri Ahonen
Nickname Flying Eagle, King Eagle, The Mask
Date of birth May 11, 1977 (1977-05-11) (age 32)
Place of birth    Lahti, Finland
Height 1.84 m
Professional information
Club Lahden Hiihtoseura
Skis Atomic
Personal best 233.5 m
World Cup
Seasons 1992-2008, 2009-
Wins 36
Other podiums 71
Total podiums 108
Infobox last updated on: January 6, 2010

Janne Petteri Ahonen (About this sound pronunciation ) (born May 11, 1977 in Lahti, Finland) is a Finnish ski jumper who has competed in the world cup since 1992. He is considered one of the best and most successful ski jumpers of all time. His achievements include five world championship gold medals (individual World Championships in 1997 (normal hill) and 2005 (large hill), and team World championships in 1995, 1997 and 2003), first place in the World Cup in 2003–2004 and 2004–2005, and first place in the Four Hills Tournament for a record-breaking five times, bettering the previous record of four by Jens Weissflog. Ahonen won the 1999 tournament without winning a single event, coming second on all four hills. Ahonen is also all-time leader in World Cup total points and podiums (108) and third in victories (36), only behind Matti Nykänen (46) and Adam Małysz (38).

Ahonen's other medals in the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships include the individual normal hill (bronze: 2005), individual large hill (bronze: 2001), team normal hill (silver: 2001), and team large hill (silver: 2001, 2005). At the FIS Ski Flying World Championships Ahonen has won a record seven medals. Ahonen has thus a total of 19 medals, sharing the record with Matti Nykänen. However, Ahonen has never won an Olympic medal from an individual competition.

In addition to competing as a ski jumper, Ahonen has also successfully maintained a side-career in drag racing, winning both Finnish and Nordic Championship titles in 2004. He races with Team Eagle Racing, which well suits his Finnish nickname "Flying Eagle". However, the team is actually named after the home city of the team "Kotka" - in English "Eagle". He is married to Tiia Ahonen, and they have two sons, Mico (born 2001) and Milo (born 2008). In December 2005 Ahonen was named the Finnish athlete of the year.

One of Ahonen's trademark features is his apparent lack of emotion when competing, as he is rarely seen smiling, even when celebrating on the podium. This has prompted the German press to conceive him nickname "The Mask".

Ahonen announced to end his ski jumping career on March 26, 2008, but he has already promised to take part in worldcup 2008-2009 in "some way or another".[1] His retirement was confirmed by the FIS in late April.[2]

Ahonen's career officially ended in Lahti on July 9, 2008 in a friendly competition on the HS 97 hill. A remarkable number of his former competitors were present, including Poland's Adam Małysz, the Germans Martin Schmitt and Georg Späth, the Austrian Andreas Goldberger and Andreas Widhölzl, Norway's Roar Ljøkelsøy and Bjørn-Einar Romøren, Japan's Noriaki Kasai, Switzerland's Andreas Küttel, and fellow Finns Tami Kiuru, Matti Hautamäki, Janne Happonen, Veli-Matti Lindström, Kimmo Yliriesto, Pasi Ahonen, Ville Larinto, and Ville Kantee. Despite three months without any training jumps, Ahonen finished his career with another victory by jumping the furthest distance on both rounds. Adam Małysz finished second and Georg Späth third. See more [3][4]

In March 2009 Ahonen announced that he will compete in season 2009-2010 listing his main targets as Winter Olympics in Vancouver, the Four Hills Tournament and the Ski-Flying World Championships.[5]

Contents

Achievements

Medal record
Men's Ski jumping
Olympic Games
Silver 2002 Salt Lake City Team large hill
Silver 2006 Turin Team large hill
World Championships
Gold 1995 Thunder Bay Team large hill
Gold 1997 Trondheim Individual normal hill
Gold 1997 Trondheim Team large hill
Gold 2003 Val di Fiemme Team large hill
Gold 2005 Oberstdorf Individual large hill
Silver 2001 Lahti Team large hill
Silver 2001 Lahti Team normal hill
Silver 2005 Oberstdorf Team large hill
Bronze 2001 Lahti Individual large hill
Bronze 2005 Oberstdorf Individual normal hill
Ski flying World Championships
Silver 1996 Bad Mitterndorf Individual
Silver 2004 Planica Individual
Silver 2004 Planica Team
Silver 2006 Bad Mitterndorf Team
Silver 2008 Oberstdorf Team
Bronze 2000 Vikersund Individual
Bronze 2008 Oberstdorf Individual

Winter Olympic Games

FIS Nordic World Ski Championships

Four Hills Tournament

FIS Ski Flying World Championships

Ski jumping World Cup

  • World Cup: 36 victories, 44 second places, 28 third places
  • Summer Grand Prix: 5 victories, 6 second places, 2 third places
  • Most podium positions of all jumpers (108)
  • Most world cup points of all jumpers
  • Six consecutive victories (ties the record with Matti Hautamäki, Thomas Morgenstern and Gregor Schlierenzauer)
  • Longest jump in the world (fell on landing): 240 m (Planica 2005)

Overall rank

  • 1992-93: 50.
  • 1993-94: 10.
  • 1994-95: 3.
  • 1995-96: 3.
  • 1996-97: 8.
  • 1997-98: 9.
  • 1998-99: 2.
  • 1999-00: 3.
  • 2000-01: 5.
  • 2001-02: 15.
  • 2002-03: 4.
  • 2003-04: 1.
  • 2004-05: 1.
  • 2005-06: 2.
  • 2006-07: 8.
  • 2007-08: 3.
  • 2008-09: -

Official hill records

World cup victories

  1. Switzerland Engelberg – December 19, 1993
  2. Germany Garmisch-Partenkirchen – January 1, 1995
  3. Norway Lillehammer – December 3, 1995
  4. Austria Kulm – February 10, 1996
  5. Finland Lahti – March 7, 1998
  6. France Chamonix – December 6, 1998
  7. Czech Republic Harrachov (HS 142) – December 19, 1998
  8. Czech Republic Harrachov (HS 142) – December 20, 1998
  9. Switzerland Engelberg – January 9, 1999
  10. Poland Zakopane – January 17, 1999
  11. Czech Republic Harrachov (HS 142) – February 7, 1999
  12. Austria Villach – December 12, 1999
  13. Finland Lahti – March 4, 2000
  14. Switzerland Engelberg – December 21, 2002
  15. Austria Innsbruck – January 4, 2003
  16. Czech Republic Liberec – January 10, 2004
  17. Czech Republic Liberec – January 11, 2004
  18. Germany Willingen – February 14, 2004
  19. Finland Kuusamo – November 27, 2004
  20. Finland Kuusamo – November 28, 2004
  21. Norway Trondheim – December 4, 2004
  22. Norway Trondheim – December 5, 2004
  23. Czech Republic Harrachov (HS 142) – December 12, 2004
  24. Switzerland Engelberg – December 18, 2004
  25. Switzerland Engelberg – December 19, 2004
  26. Germany Oberstdorf (HS 137) – December 29, 2004
  27. Germany Garmisch-Partenkirchen – January 1, 2005
  28. Austria Innsbruck – January 3, 2005
  29. Germany Willingen – January 9, 2005
  30. Germany Titisee-Neustadt – January 22, 2005
  31. Germany Oberstdorf (HS 137) – December 29, 2005
  32. Austria Bischofshofen – January 6, 2006
  33. Austria Bischofshofen (replaced: Innsbruck) – January 5, 2008
  34. Austria Bischofshofen – January 6, 2008
  35. Czech Republic Harrachov (HS 205) – January 20, 2008
  36. Finland Kuopio – March 4, 2008

References

Awards
Preceded by
Finland Marko Yli-Hannuksela
Finnish Sportspersonality of the year
2005
Succeeded by
Finland Jukka Keskisalo







Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message