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Jean-Hippolyte Flandrin

Jean-Hippolyte Flandrin (March 23, 1809 – March 21, 1864) was a 19th-century French painter. His celebrated 1836 work Jeune Homme Nu Assis au Bord de la Mer ("Young Male Nude Seated beside the Sea") is in the Louvre.

Contents

Biography

Early life

From an early age, Flandrin showed interest in the arts and a career as a painter. However, his parents pressured him to become a businessman, and having very little training, he was forced to instead become a miniature painter.

Hippolyte was the second of three sons, all of whom were painters in some aspect. Augusto, his older brother, spent most of his life as a professor at Lyon and later died there. Paul, his younger brother, was a painter of portraits and religious imagery.

Hippolyte and Paul spent some time at Lyon, saving to leave for Paris in 1829 and study under Louis Hersent. Eventually, they settled in the studio of Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, who became not only their instructor but their friend for life. At first, Hippolyte struggled as a poor artist. However, in 1832, he won the Prix de Rome for his painting Recognition of Theseus by his Father. This prestigious art scholarship meant that he was no longer limited by his poverty.

Career

Polytès, Son of Priam, Observing the Movements of the Greeks (1833-34)

The Prix de Rome allowed him to study for five years in Rome. While there, he created several paintings, increasing his celebrity both in France and Italy. His painting St. Clair Healing the Blind was created for the cathedral of Nantes, and at the exhibition of 1855 years later, it also brought him a medal of the first class. Jesus and the Little Children was given by the government to the town of Lisieux. Dante and Virgil visiting the Envious Men struck with Blindness and Euripides writing his Tragedies are now in the Museum of Fine Arts in Lyon.

Upon his return to Paris in 1856, Flandrin received a commission from the chapel of St John in the church of St Séverin. As a result, his reputation became even more impressive, virtually guaranteeing him continuous employment for the rest of his life.

In addition to these works, Flandrin also painted a great number of portraits. However, he is much more known today for his monumental decorative paintings. The most notable of these are found in the following locations:

  • in the sanctuary, choir, and nave of St Germain des Prés at Paris (1842-1861)
  • in the church of St Paul at Nîmes (1848-1849)
  • of St Vincent de Paul at Paris (1850-1854)
  • in the church of St-Martin-d'Ainay at Lyon (1855)

Death

In 1856, Flandrin was elected to the Académie des Beaux-Arts. In 1863, his failing health, made worse by his hard work and extended exposure to the damp and draughts of churches, induced him to visit Italy again, where he died of smallpox at Rome on March 21, 1864.

References

External links

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica, Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

JEAN HIPPOLYTE FLANDRIN (1809-1864), French painter, was born at Lyons in 1809. His father, though brought up to business, had great fondness for art, and sought himself to follow an artist's career. Lack of early training, however, disabled him for success, and he was obliged to take up the precarious occupation of a miniature painter. Hippolyte was the second of three sons, all painters, and two of them eminent, the third son Paul (b. 18r I) ranking as one of the leaders of the modern landscape school of France. Auguste (1804-1842), the eldest, passed the greater part of his life as professor at Lyons, where he died. After studying for some time at Lyons, Hippolyte and Paul, who had long determined on the step and economized for it, set out to walk to Paris in 1829, to place themselves under the tuition of Hersent. They chose finally to enter the atelier of Ingres, who became not only their instructor but their friend for life. At first considerably hampered by poverty, Hippolyte's difficulties were for ever removed by his taking, in 1832, the Grand Prix de Rome, awarded for his picture of the "Recognition of Theseus by his Father." This allowed him to study five years at Rome, whence he sent home several pictures which considerably raised his fame. "St Clair healing the Blind" was done for the cathedral of Nantes, and years after, at the exhibition of 1855, brought him a medal of the first class. "Jesus and the Little Children" was given by the government to the town of Lisieux. "Dante and Virgil visiting the Envious Men struck with Blindness," and "Euripides writing his Tragedies," belong to the museum at Lyons. Returning to Paris through Lyons in 18 3 8 he soon received a commission to ornament the chapel of St John in the church of St Severin at Paris, and reputation increased and employment continued abundant for the rest of his life. Besides the pictures mentioned above, and others of a similar kind, he painted a great number of portraits. The works, however, upon which his fame most surely rests are his monumental decorative paintings. Of these the principal are those executed in the following churches: - in the sanctuary of St Germain des Pres at Paris (1842-1844), in the choir of the same church (1846-1848), in the church of St Paul at Nismes (1848-1849), of St Vincent de Paul at Paris (1850-1854), in the church of Ainay at Lyons (1855), in the nave of St Germain des Pres (1855-1861). In 1856 Hippolyte Flandrin was elected to the Academie des Beaux-Arts. In 1863 his failing health, rendered worse by incessant toil and exposure to the damp and draughts of churches, induced him again to visit Italy. He died of smallpox at Rome on the 21st of March 1864. As might naturally be expected in one who looked upon painting as but the vehicle for the expression of spiritual sentiment, he had perhaps too little pride in the technical qualities of his art. There is shown in his works much of that austerity and coldness, expressed in form and colour, which springs from a faith which feels itself in opposition to the tendencies of surrounding life. He has been compared to Fra Angelico; but the faces of his long processions of saints and martyrs seem to express rather the austerity of souls convicted of sin than the joy and purity of never-corrupted life which shines from the work of the early master.

See Delaborde, Lettres et pensees de H. Flandrin (Paris, 1865); Beule, Notice historique sur H. F. (1869).


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