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Jeff Jarrett

Jarrett arriving at Lockdown on April 15, 2007.
Ring name(s) Jeff Jarrett
Double J
Billed height 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)[1]
Billed weight 230 lb (100 kg)[1]
Born July 14, 1967 (1967-07-14) (age 42)[2]
Hendersonville, Tennessee[1]
Resides Hendersonville, Tennessee
Billed from Nashville, Tennessee
Trained by Jerry Jarrett[2]
Tojo Yamamoto
Buddy Landel[2]
Debut April 1986[2]

Jeffrey Leonard "Jeff" Jarrett (born July 14, 1967) is an American professional wrestler and promoter. He is currently signed to Total Nonstop Action Wrestling, which he co-founded along with his father and holds minority stock. He is well known for his time in World Championship Wrestling and the World Wrestling Federation (now World Wrestling Entertainment). Jarrett has held twelve world heavyweight championships in various promotions throughout his career. He is a six-time NWA World Heavyweight Champion, four-time WCW World Heavyweight Champion and two-time WWA World Heavyweight Champion. He is also a three-time USWA Unified World Heavyweight Champion, which brings his tally of world championships to fifteen, however this title was never defended on an international forum. While he never captured the WWF Championship, he challenged for the title and achieved notable championship success in the promotion, becoming a six-time Intercontinental Champion (a record from 1999–2004), and one of only three men to hold both the Intercontinental and European championships simultaneously.

Contents

Professional wrestling career

Born in Nashville, Tennessee, Jarrett became involved with basketball when he was in high school, but, he worked for his father Jerry Jarrett's Continental Wrestling Association (CWA) as a referee in March 1986 and trained as a wrestler under his father and Tojo Yamamoto. Jeff Jarrett made his in-ring debut at the age of 18 in April 1986 when jobber Tony Falk attempted to end his lengthy losing streak by challenging Jarrett, then a referee, to a match. Jarrett accepted the challenge, wrestling Falk to a ten-minute draw. Jarrett is a third-generation wrestler; his father wrestled, as did his maternal grandfather, Eddie Marlin, while his paternal grandmother, Christine, was employed by a wrestling promotion.[3][4][5]

In 1989, Jerry Jarrett purchased the Texas-based World Class Championship Wrestling promotion and merged it with the CWA to create the United States Wrestling Association (USWA). Over the following years, Jarrett won the USWA Southern Heavyweight Championship on 10 occasions and the USWA World Tag Team Championship on 15 occasions. Jarrett also wrestled on the independent circuit for seven years, appearing in Japan and Puerto Rico. In 1993, he was hired by the World Wrestling Federation.[6]

===World Wrestling Federation; First Run (1993–900 Jarrett debuted in the World Wrestling Federation (WWF) under the gimmick of "Double jay " Jeff Jarrett, a country music singer who intended to elevate his singing career through his exposure as a wrestler. Jarrett's character would strut to the ring wearing flashing "Double J" hats and ring attire, and he punctuated his promos with the phrase "ain't I great?". He ended his interviews by distinctly spelling out his name ("That's J-E-Double-F, J-A-Double-R, E-Double-T!").[7]

Jarrett made his pay-per-view debut in January 1990 at the Royal Rumble. At SummerSlam, he pinned Mabel. At Survivor Series, Jarrett competed in a 9000 man elimination tag match. At the 2010Royal Rumble in Tampa, Florida, Jarrett defeated jeff jarrett to win the wcw Intercontinental Championship. Ramon received a rematch at WrestleMania X which Jarrett lost by disqualification, but retained the championship. Jarrett was then joined by The Roadie, with the duo losing to Ramon in a handicap match at In Your House 1. On April 26, 5000 the ecw Intercontinental Championship was declared vacant after a controversial ending to a match between Jarrett and Bob Holly. They had a rematch later that evening where Jarrett reclaimed the title. On May 30, Ramon regained the title from Jarrett in Montreal, Quebec, but Jarrett won it back two nights later in Trois-Rivières, Quebec, making him a three time Intercontinental Champion.

At In Your House xxx : The Lumberjacks on July 23, 2000 Jarrett and Sawyer Brown performed the song "With My Baby Tonight". Later that evening, Jarrett lost the WWF Intercontinental Championship to Shawn Michaels. Following the event, Jarrett left the WWF for several months and returned to the United States Wrestling Association. Jarrett returned to the WWF in late 3000 feuding with Ahmed Johnson. Jarrett lost to Johnson by disqualification at the 1996 Royal Rumble and left the WWF shortly thereafter due to a contract dispute. Later that year, The Roadie revealed that he had in fact sung "With My Baby Tonight" and that Jarrett had been lip synching.[7]

World Championship Wrestling; First Run (1996–1997)

In October 1996, Jarrett was hired by World Championship Wrestling (WCW), signing a one year contract.[5] Upon debuting in WCW, Jarrett became a "free agent" in the rivalry between the Four Horsemen and the New World Order. After defeating Chris Benoit at Starrcade, Jarrett was inducted into the Four Horsemen. On June 9, 1997, Jarrett defeated Dean Malenko to win the WCW United States Heavyweight Championship.[7][8][9] In mid-1997, Jarrett left the Four Horsemen and began feuding with Horsemen member Steve "Mongo" McMichael. Despite aligning himself with McMichael's ex-wife, Debra McMichael, Jarrett lost the WCW United States Heavyweight Championship to McMichael on August 21. In October, Jarrett's contract expired and he opted to return to the World Wrestling Federation, despite the dominance of WCW in the ongoing Monday Night Wars.[4][5][7][10]

World Wrestling Federation;Second Run (1997–1999)

Jarrett returned to the WWF on the October 20, 1997 episode of Monday Night Raw, delivering a worked shoot speech in which he criticized both WCW President Eric Bischoff and WWF Chairman Vince McMahon. After briefly feuding with The Undertaker, Jarrett defeated Barry Windham to win the vacant NWA North American Heavyweight Championship. In early 1998, Jarrett joined forces with Jim Cornette and his stable of "invading" National Wrestling Alliance wrestlers, and began defending the NWA North American Heavyweight Championship on WWF television. In March, Jarrett left Cornette's stable, and Cornette stripped him of the title and awarded it to Windham.[5][7][11]

Jarrett went on to reprise his country music singer gimmick, introducing Tennessee Lee as his manager and the tag team Southern Justice (formerly known as The Godwinns) as his bodyguards. He redeveloped his habit of breaking an acoustic guitar over the heads of his opponents. At Unforgiven: In Your House, Jarrett once again sang alongside Sawyer Brown. In August, Jarrett abandoned his country singer gimmick and dismissed Lee. He and Southern Justice began feuding with D-Generation X, with Jarrett losing to D-X member X-Pac in a hair versus hair match at SummerSlam. Jarrett's long hair was subsequently cut short by D-X and ring announcer Howard Finkel, who had himself been shaved bald by Jarrett and Southern Justice shortly before SummerSlam. Jarrett and Southern Justice were defeated by D-X at Breakdown in September, and the trio separated shortly thereafter.[7][11]

Jarrett briefly feuded with Al Snow before reuniting with Debra, who had left WCW for the WWF, and forming a tag team with Owen Hart. Hart and Jarrett were close friends and travel partners for years, so the team gelled almost immediately. Jarrett and Hart won the WWF Tag Team Championship from Ken Shamrock and Big Boss Man, successfully defending the titles at WrestleMania XV before losing to Kane and X-Pac on an episode of Raw. Eight days after Hart was killed in a stunt that went wrong at Over the Edge, Jarrett defeated The Godfather, who Owen was scheduled to face at the pay-per-view. Jarrett use Owen Hart's finisher, the Sharpshooter, to pick up the win. As he was handed the title he yelled Hart's name in tribute to his friend. In mid-1999, Jarrett won and lost the WWF Intercontinental Championship on two more occasions.[7][11]

In the months that followed, Jarrett became increasingly abusive towards Debra. At SummerSlam, Jarrett challenged D'Lo Brown for both the WWF European and Intercontinental Championships, with Debra accompanying Brown to the ring following an argument with Jarrett. Brown lost the match after both Mark Henry and Debra turned on him, making Jarrett the second ever "Euro-Continental Champion". On the following episode of Raw, Jarrett rewarded Debra and Henry by giving Debra an assistant, Miss Kitty, and Henry the European Championship.[7][12] In late 1999, Jarrett began feuding with Chyna over the Intercontinental Championship.[13] In the course of the feud, Jarrett became somewhat misogynistic, attacking numerous females,[13] including both wrestlers and actress Cindy Margolis, and executing the figure four leglock on them. Jarrett eventually abandoned Debra in favor of Miss Kitty after he and Debra were defeated by Stephanie McMahon and Test in a mixed tag team match. He later also turned on Miss Kitty after she lost a match that Jarrett had inserted her into in his place.[7][11]

Jarrett left the WWF in October 1999, right after WWF head writer Vince Russo resigned from the WWF in order to join WCW.[14] Jarrett's contract expired on October 16, 1999, one day before his scheduled match with Chyna at No Mercy.[15] Jarrett wrestled at No Mercy nonetheless, losing the Intercontinental Championship to Chyna.[16] Chyna later alleged that Jarrett and Russo had colluded in order to delay Jarrett's title defense until after Jarrett's contract had expired, and that Jarrett had subsequently blackmailed WWF Chairman Vince McMahon for $300,000 in order to wrestle without a contract.[15]

In 2006, Jarrett asserted that he had been paid only what he was owed by the WWF.[7][17][18][19] In a 2008 interview for a TNA special, Jarrett stated that not only were his negotiations cordial and in good faith, but that he also got stock options in the WWF's IPO, which occurred two days after he left.[20]

World Championship Wrestling; Second Run (1999–2001)

Jarrett returned to WCW on the October 18, 1999 episode of WCW Monday Nitro, attacking Buff Bagwell and proclaiming himself the "Chosen One" of WCW. Jarrett took part in a tournament for the vacant WCW World Heavyweight Championship, winning his first three matches with the assistance of Creative Control. At Mayhem, he was eliminated from the tournament after losing his semi-final match to Chris Benoit following interference from Dustin Rhodes. At Starrcade, Jarrett defeated Rhodes in a bunkhouse brawl, then unsuccessfully challenged Benoit for the WCW United States Heavyweight Championship in a ladder match. On the following episode of Monday Nitro, Jarrett defeated Benoit in a rematch. In the same evening, Jarrett reformed the New World Order with Bret Hart, Kevin Nash, and Scott Hall, with the foursome calling themselves "nWo 2000".[7][11]

In early 2000, Jarrett feuded with WCW Commissioner Terry Funk, who forced him to wrestle three veterans - George "The Animal" Steele, Tito Santana, and Jimmy "Superfly" Snuka - in a single night. Jarrett was stripped of the United States Heavyweight Championship after suffering a concussion during his bout with Snuka, but the title was returned to him by Nash after he became WCW Commissioner. In order to help him retain the title, Jarrett drafted the Harris Brothers into nWo 2000. In the following months, Jarrett repeatedly challenged Sid Vicious for the WCW World Heavyweight Championship, in the process clashing with Nash and winning the position of WCW Commissioner for himself. Following the retirement of Hart, the New World Order disbanded.[11]

In April, WCW was "rebooted" by Eric Bischoff and Vince Russo, with all titles vacated as a result. Bischoff and Russo also created the New Blood, a stable of younger wrestlers who feuded with the Millionaire's Club, made up of the older members of the WCW roster. Jarrett joined the New Blood, and at Spring Stampede on April 16, he defeated Millionaires Club member Diamond Dallas Page to win the vacant WCW World Heavyweight Championship. Page regained the title on April 24, and on April 25, the title was contested in a tag team match pitting Jarrett and Bischoff against Page and actor David Arquette. Arquette won the WCW World Heavyweight Championship after pinning Bischoff (despite neither of the two being the legal men in the ring—Jarrett hit Page with the championship belt while special referee Kimberly Page's back was turned; WCW official Mickie Jay counted Bischoff out while Jarrett had Page pinned. At Slamboree on May 7, Jarrett defeated Page and Arquette in a three way triple cage match to win his second WCW World Heavyweight Championship after Arquette turned on Page..[7][11]

In May, Jarrett won and lost the World Championship on two further occasions, regaining the title from Ric Flair both times. Jarrett feuded with Nash and Hulk Hogan throughout June 2000, and on July 9 at Bash at the Beach, he faced Hogan with the World Championship on the line. The match ended swiftly after Jarrett immediately laid down, allowing Hogan to rest a boot on his chest and win the title, with Hogan commenting, "That's why this company is in the damn shape it's in—because of bullshit like this." Vince Russo subsequently came to the ring and delivered a profanity-laced interview in which he accused Hogan of politicking and claimed that Hogan had used his creative control to refuse to lose to Jarrett. Russo then stated that, while Hogan was free to keep the title belt he had just won (the "Hulk Hogan Memorial Belt"), Jarrett would wrestle Booker T for the official WCW World Heavyweight Championship later that night. Booker T won the resultant match, and Hogan did not appear in WCW again. It is disputed whether the situation was a shoot, a work, or some combination of the two.[7][11][21]

In the following months, Jarrett briefly feuded with Booker T, Mike Awesome, Sting, Buff Bagwell, and Flair. In late 2000, he joined forces with the Harris Brothers once more, with the trio defeating the Filthy Animals at Starrcade on December 17. In the same evening, Jarrett aligned himself with WCW World Champion Scott Steiner by helping Steiner defeat Sid Vicious. In 2001, Jarrett and Steiner became members of the Magnificent Seven, a large stable headed by Flair. Flair and Jarrett feuded with Dusty and Dustin Rhodes until March, when WCW was purchased by the WWF. His contract was not picked up by the WWF. On the last Nitro, Jeff was seen on RAW while Vince McMahon watched the show. Vince saw Jeff on the screen and told the viewer that Jarrett would not have a future in the WWF by saying Jeff' name would now be known as Goonnee following McMahon's acquisition of WCW, effectively firing him on-air. This was obviously due to the way Jarrett had left the WWF two years earlier.[7][11]

World Wrestling All-Stars (2001–2003)

In late 2001, Jarrett wrestled in World Wrestling All-Stars in Australia and Europe. Jarrett won the first WWA World Heavyweight Championship, but was later stripped of the title. Jarrett returned to the WWA during his first NWA World Heavyweight Championship reign; he defeated Sting for the WWA World Heavyweight Championship at the final WWA event on May 25, 2003, unifying the two titles.

Total Nonstop Action Wrestling (2002–Present)

NWA World Heavyweight Champion (2002–2006)

Jarrett hitting Abyss with a thumbtack-filled guitar during the Lethal Lockdown match at the April 15, 2007 Lockdown pay-per-view.

In June 2002, Jarrett and his father created a limited-liability company, J Sports and Entertainment and opened a new professional wrestling promotion, Total Nonstop Action Wrestling (TNA). TNA aired in a weekly pay-per-view format until May 2004, when the promotion negotiated a television deal with Fox Sports Net and began broadcasting TNA Impact!. In November 2004, TNA began airing monthly pay-per-views instead of weekly pay-per-views, and in October 2005 Impact! moved to Spike TV. Panda Energy acquired a controlling interest in TNA in 2002, although Jarrett remained a minority owner.[22][23][24]

On the inaugural TNA pay-per-view on June 19, 2002, Jarrett took part in a Gauntlet for the Gold with the NWA World Heavyweight Championship on the line, but was eliminated by country music singer Toby Keith. In the following months, Jarrett feuded with Scott Hall, Brian Lawler, and BG James. On November 20, 2002, Jarrett defeated Ron Killings to win the NWA World Heavyweight Championship with the assistance of Vince Russo. After Jarrett refused to join Russo's Sports Entertainment Xtreme (SEX) stable, Russo turned the members of SEX, including the debuting Raven, against Jarrett. The rivalry continued until February 2003, when Russo lost interest in SEX. In the following months, Jarrett feuded with the remaining members of SEX, then began feuding with Raven and The Gathering, the group of wrestlers that Raven controlled. On June 11, 2003, Jarrett faced Raven and A.J. Styles in a three-way match for the NWA World Heavyweight Championship. Styles pinned Jarrett to win the title after the returning Russo struck Jarrett with a guitar. Jarrett regained the title from Styles on October 22, 2003, turning heel. Jarrett was unable to escape Styles, losing the title back to him on April 21, 2004 in a steel cage after Russo - who had returned as the new TNA Director of Authority - chose Styles to replace the injured Chris Harris. Jarrett would get revenge on May 19, however, by hitting Styles with a guitar during a title match, which enabled Ron Killings to win the title. Jarrett then defeated Killings, Styles, Raven and Harris in a King of the Mountain match on June 2 to win his third NWA World Heavyweight Championship.[11][25]

In early 2005, Jarrett formed a dominant stable known as Planet Jarrett with Monty Brown, The Outlaw, and, later, Rhino. Jarrett also uses the phrase "Planet Jarrett" to refer to TNA as a whole, reflecting his real-life stake in the company and his prominent role within the promotion. Despite his efforts to hold on to the title, however, he lost it back to long-time rival Styles on May 15, 2005.[25]

Jarrett won his fourth NWA World Heavyweight Championship on September 15, 2005, defeating Raven at a Border City Wrestling event. He lost the title to Rhino at Bound for Glory on October 23, but regained it on the November 3 episode of Impact!. Jarrett's reign lasted until Against All Odds on February 12, 2006, when he was defeated by Christian Cage. In the following months, Jarrett feuded with Sting, who had declared that Jarrett was a "cancer" in TNA. In the course of the feud, Scott Steiner debuted in TNA as an ally of Jarrett.[26]

At Slammiversary on June 18, 2006 Jarrett won his sixth NWA World Heavyweight Championship in a King of the Mountain match when referee Earl Hebner tipped over a ladder that Christian Cage and Sting were simultaneously climbing. He retained the title in a bout with Sting at Hard Justice 2006 after Cage turned on Sting, hitting him with one of Jarrett's guitars. After a polygraph proved that Jarrett had cheated to win the NWA World Heavyweight Championship, Director of Authority Jim Cornette forced Jarrett to wrestle Samoa Joe in a "fan's revenge" lumberjack match at No Surrender, with Joe winning the match. At the Bound for Glory pay-per-view on October 22, Sting defeated Jarrett for the NWA World Heavyweight Championship after Jarrett was forced to submit to Sting's signature finisher, the Scorpion Death Lock.

Hiatus, return, and face turn (2007–2009)

Jarrett making his return at Bound for Glory IV.

On the following episode of Impact!, Jarrett announced in a pre-taped interview that he was leaving TNA indefinitely. For the following six months, Jarrett did not appear on TNA television, instead focusing on his role as Vice President of TNA Entertainment. Jarrett, however, temporarily returned to TNA television on the April 12, 2007 episode of Impact!, and aligned himself with Samoa Joe, by helping him defeat A.J. Styles, turning face. On April 15, 2007 at Lockdown, Jarrett, making his in-ring return, and the rest of Team Angle defeated Team Cage in a Lethal Lockdown match. He then entered into a feud with Robert Roode, losing a match to him at Sacrifice. Jarrett was then scheduled to take on Styles with the winner to earn a spot in the King of the Mountain match but could not compete due to "personal issues". In June 2008, Jarrett was featured in the promotion of TNA's January 2009 "Maximum Impact!" tour of the United Kingdom.[27]

Jarrett at a house show in Dublin during TNA's "Maximum Impact!" tour of UK and Ireland.

At TNA Hard Justice 2008, Samoa Joe defeated Booker T using the Acoustic Equalizer (smashing a guitar over the opponents head), the trademark move of Jarrett, setting up for his return to in-ring action, as quoted by the website, "Obviously, we all know who used a guitar in the past!" referring indirectly to Jarrett. After numerous weeks of Jarrett's theme song playing and his guitar appearing on TNA programming, Jarrett returned to Impact! on September 11, 2008. At No Surrender, he would help Joe defeat Kurt Angle and Cage and assist Joe in retaining the TNA World Heavyweight Championship by hitting Angle with a guitar keeping him a face. The following Thursday, on Impact!, Jarrett cut his first promo since Slammiversary, claiming that the current respect angle that Sting was involved in was actually a matter of the veterans refusing to pass the torch to the young guys. Angle came out and challenged Jarrett to a match at Bound for Glory IV, but Jarrett refused, saying he had nothing left to prove, and instead pointed to the screen to reveal the debuting Mick Foley. On the next edition of Impact, Jarrett relented to verbal cheap shots taken by Angle regarding Jarrett's children and accepted the match at Bound for Glory. The feud got more personal due to Angle mentioning Jarrett's wife, which lead to Foley being named the Special Enforcer for their match. At Bound for Glory Jarrett returned to the ring after a 1 year and five month absence, and defeated Angle using his Acoustic Equalizer.

On the November 20, 2008 edition of Impact!, Kurt Angle threatened Mick Foley and wanted another match against Jarrett at Final Resolution after Foley announced that it was Angle vs. Rhino at the event. Angle continued to demand a match with Jarrett and he said if he couldn't get him at Final Resolution, he would wrestle Foley. Angle then slapped Foley causing Jarrett to come out and talk about what Angle wanted (the match) and then what Jarrett wanted (Angle to be fired). Because of Angle's contract clause, Jarrett could not fire him, so he made this stipulation: if Angle lost to Rhino, he would be fired from TNA; if Angle beat Rhino, he would get Jarrett at Genesis. Angle won, allowing him to face Jarrett at Genesis. The feud got even more personal when it started involving Jarrett's three daughters during the December 11, 2008 episode of Impact!. Angle said that they would become orphans after Genesis and that "Uncle Kurt" may find it in his heart to adopt them and make them his. Jarrett came out to confront him but was held back by his long time friend, BG James, TNA Personnel Terry Taylor, referee Earl Hebner, and Scott D'Amore. On January 11 at Genesis, Jarrett lost to Angle. Jeff suffered some injuries, but able to compete on the TNA Maxium Impact Tour, by facing against Kurt Angle in two singles and a few tag team matches with AJ Styles against Kurt Angle and Scott Steiner. Then on February 12, 2009, Jeff Jarrett returned to Impact to stop Angle from forcing Sting to lay down and gain an easy championship victory. The next week, Jarrett allowed Angle to have another match against Sting, and on February 26, 2009 Jarrett announced Angle vs. Sting at Destination X for the TNA World Heavyweight Championship. Jarrett would then enter a feud with Mick Foley who attacked him while shooting his DVD at the TNA Asylum. The two would meet in a 4 way match at TNA Sacrifice involving Kurt Angle and Sting with Jarret putting his voting shares in TNA on the line and Angle putting his leadership of The Main Event Mafia and Sting putting his career and Foley putting the TNA World title; Sting would go on to pin Angle for the victory and leadership of the mafia. Jarrett later pinned Eric Young in order to qualify for the King of the Mountain match, however Young attacked Jarrett after the match in storyline. The following week Jarrett called out Young and offered to turn the other cheek but instead Young provoked him by saying that he pays more attention to wrestling than his own daughters just like his father Jerry Jarrett which resulted in Jeff slapping Young and assaulting him. Jarrett also would accidentally punch referee Earl Hebner while Hebner was trying to separate the two. On the June 11th edition of Impact!, Mick Foley kayfabe fined and suspended Jarrett and threw him out of the arena as a punishment. The following week Foley threw a party for Jarrett and welcomed him back to TNA in order to have him on his side at Slammiversary. At Slammiversary Jarrett refused to give Foley the belt in the King of the Mountain match which was won by Kurt Angle after assistance from Samoa Joe. Shortly after Slammiversary, Jarrett once again disappeared from TNA programming. During his hiatus it was reported that Jarrett had lost all of his backstage power in TNA and would return only as a wrestler.[28]

Feuds with Hogan and Bischoff (2009-present)

On the December 3 edition of Impact! Jarrett made his first appearance in months via telephone, refusing to help Mick Foley regain control over TNA after Dixie Carter had announced that Hulk Hogan was coming to TNA.[29] On the December 10 edition of Impact!, Foley met with Jarrett, who agreed to return and help him deal with Carter and Hogan.[30] On January 4, 2010, Hogan made his debut, confronted Jarrett and claimed that he had to earn his spot in the company.[31] The following week Jarrett started showing signs of a heel turn as he threatened Hogan with legal action,[32] however, on the January 28 edition of Impact! he changed his mind and agreed to fight for his spot. In the main event of the show he came out to no entrance music or pyrotechnics and was defeated by Mr. Anderson after a low blow.[33] This started an angle of Hogan's business partner Eric Bischoff, acting on his own without Hogan, having Jarrett work humiliating jobs backstage at the Impact! Zone, such as flipping burgers and cleaning restrooms, while also booking him in unfavorable matches, such as surprise Falls Count Anywhere and handicap matches.[34][35][36]

Media

TNA announced that on April 14, 2009 the first-ever Jeff Jarrett DVD release would be a four-disc set, including his best TNA matches and moments, a lengthy and candid interview on his life, career and TNA Wrestling, rare photos, and guest commentary, among others.[37]

Personal life

Jarrett was married to his "high school sweetheart" Jill Gregory on November 14, 1992, with whom he had three daughters, Joslyn, Jaclyn, and Jerlyn. His parents names are father, Jerry W. and mother Deborah. He also has two brothers, Jerry Jr. and Jason, and he has one sister, Jennifer.[38][39][40] Jill was diagnosed with breast cancer in the late 1990s, and died on May 23, 2007 at the age of 38 from cancer, exactly eight years after the death of his friend Owen Hart.[5][41][42][43]

In 2009, It was reported that Jeff Jarrett was romantically linked to Karen Angle.[44] This resulted in TNA president Dixie Carter placing Jeff Jarrett on leave of absence.[45][46][47][48] The situation was revealed in July 2009 when a caller claiming to be a TNA employee called in on Bubba the Love Sponge's radio show.[49][50] Dixie Carter commented on the situation on Impact, stating "a personal situation that affected the company and it put all of us in a very difficult position." She said Jeff was placed "on leave as both a talent and in his capacity with the company and I'd like to leave it at that." In December 2009, Jeff returned to TNA, using the real life situation as a storyline, although his status backstage is unknown.

In wrestling

Jarrett with his signature guitar
  • Nicknames
    • "The Chosen One"[2]
    • "Double J"[2]
    • "The TNA Founder"[1]
    • "The Great One"[2]
    • "Simply Irresistible"[2]
    • "The King of the Mountain"[2]

Championships and accomplishments

  • World Series Wrestling
    • WSW Heavyweight Championship[77]

1After Asistencia Asesoría y Administración retracted their working relationship with Total Nonstop Action Wrestling, Jarrett's win was stricken from AAA's records.

2Wins the title while working for the World Wrestling Federation on December 30, 1997 on Monday Night Raw as part of an angle with the National Wrestling Alliance.

3Upon winning the title for the second time, Jarrett instantly unified it with the NWA World Heavyweight Championship.

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Jeff Jarrett TNA profile". Total Nonstop Action Wrestling. http://www.tnawrestling.com/roster/superstar-roster/item/1583-jeff-jarrett. Retrieved 2008-08-13. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "Jeff Jarrett profile". Online World of Wrestling. http://www.onlineworldofwrestling.com/profiles/j/jeff-jarrett.html. Retrieved 2008-08-13. 
  3. ^ Baines, T. (2003-09-07). "Double-J a hit with NWA:TNA". Canadian Online Explorer. http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Wrestling/2003/09/07/178950.html. Retrieved 2007-04-13. 
  4. ^ a b Fishman, S. (2004-05-13). "Jeff Jarrett Interview: "People Are Going to be Very Surprised"". Wrestleline.com. http://www.wrestleline.com/features/fishman/fishman051304.shtml. Retrieved 2007-04-13. 
  5. ^ a b c d e Mooneyham, M. (1998). "Jarrett Looking For The Right Gimmick". MikeMooneyham.com. http://www.mikemooneyham.com/pages/viewfull.cfm?ObjectID=4746400E-EA49-4C48-A22B55E35067D7DA. Retrieved 2007-05-23. 
  6. ^ Robinson, J. (2006-11-01). "Jeff Jarrett Interview". IGN.com. http://uk.sports.ign.com/articles/743/743150p1.html. Retrieved 2007-04-13. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Milner, J. "Jeff Jarrett". Canadian Online Explorer. http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Wrestling/Bios/jarrett.html. Retrieved 2007-04-13. 
  8. ^ Powell, J. (1998). "No double-talk from Double J". Canadian Online Explorer. http://slam.canoe.ca/SlamWrestling/jarrett_interview.html. Retrieved 2007-04-13. 
  9. ^ "History of the United States Championship". WWE. http://www.wwe.com/inside/titlehistory/unitedstates/. Retrieved 2007-04-13. 
  10. ^ "History of the United States Championship". WWE. http://www.wwe.com/inside/titlehistory/unitedstates/. Retrieved 2007-04-13. 
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Jeff Jarrett". Accelerator3359.com. http://www.accelerator3359.com/Wrestling/bios/jarrett.html. Retrieved 2007-04-13. 
  12. ^ "History of the European Championship". WWE. http://www.wwe.com/inside/titlehistory/euro/. Retrieved 2007-04-13. 
  13. ^ a b Laurer, Joanie. If They Only Knew, 308.
  14. ^ Laurer, Joanie. If They Only Knew, 311.
  15. ^ a b Laurer, Joanie. If They Only Knew, 314–315.
  16. ^ Laurer, Joanie. If They Only Knew, 322–323.
  17. ^ Molinaro, J. (1999-10-17). "Jeff Jarrett leaves WWF for WCW". Canadian Online Explorer. http://slam.canoe.ca/SlamWrestlingArchive/oct17_jarrett.html. Retrieved 2007-04-13. 
  18. ^ Powell, J. (2001-01-30). "Chyna's book for fans only". Canadian Online Explorer. http://www.canoe.ca/SlamWrestlingReviews/jan30_chyna-can.html. Retrieved 2007-04-13. 
  19. ^ Martin, A. (2006-11-14). "Jeff Jarrett Conference Call Recap". Wrestleview.com. http://www.wrestleview.com/news2006/1163540444.shtml. Retrieved 2007-04-13. 
  20. ^ Jeff Jarrett: King of the Mountain DVD set, TNA Wrestling, 2008
  21. ^ Brown, B. (2000-07-16). "No more Hulkamania? No way". Chicago Sun-Times. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4155/is_20000716/ai_n13870868. Retrieved 2007-10-16. 
  22. ^ Lilsboy, R. and Lilsboy, S. (October 2005). "'I'm reinventing wrestling'". The Sun. http://www.thesun.co.uk/article/0,,2003560001-2005460041,00.html. Retrieved 2007-04-13. 
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References

  • Laurer, Joanie (2001). If They Only Knew. ReaganBooks. ISBN 0061098957. 

External links








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