Jerry Moore: Wikis

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jerry Moore
Jerry Moore
Jerry Moore
Title Head coach
College Appalachian State
Sport Football
Team record 189–76 (.713)
Born July 18, 1939 (1939-07-18) (age 70)
Place of birth Bonham, Texas
Career highlights
Overall 216–124–2 (.635)
Coaching stats
College Football DataWarehouse
Championships
NCAA Division I Football Championship (2006, 2007)
NCAA Division I-AA Football Championship (2005)
Southern Conference Championship (1991, 1995, 1999, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009)
Awards
Eddie Robinson Award (2006)
Liberty Mutual Coach of the Year (2009)
AFCA Coach of the Year (2005, 2006, 2007)
AFCA Regional Coach of the Year (1994, 1995, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009)
Southern Conference Coach of the Year (1991, 1994, 1995, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009)
Playing career
1958–1960 Baylor
Position Wide receiver
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1965–1972
1973–1977
1978
1979–1980
1981–1985
1988–1989
1989–present
SMU (Asst.)
Nebraska (WR)
Nebraska (OC)
North Texas
Texas Tech
Arkansas (Asst.)
Appalachian State

Gerald Hundley "Jerry" Moore (born July 18, 1939 in Bonham, Texas[1]) is the current head football coach of the Appalachian State University Mountaineers located in the town of Boone in Watauga County, North Carolina. He has filled the position since 1989. Moore has had a winning record in 19 out of the last 20 seasons. He led the Mountaineers to the NCAA Division I-AA Football Championship in 2005. This was the first national championship for any collegiate football team in the state of North Carolina. Moore and the Mountaineers repeated as champions in 2006 and 2007, for the first "three-peat" in Division I FCS/I-AA history.

Contents

Playing career

Moore played wide receiver for the Baylor Bears. He was coached by Sam Boyd in 1958 and John Bridgers in 1959 and 1960. Moore captained the 1960 Gator Bowl team that ended the year as the nation's eleventh-ranked squad.

Moore received degrees from Baylor University in finance and economics.

Coaching career

Moore began his coaching career at Corsicana High School under Texas high school coach Jim Acree.[2] In 1965, he became assistant coach at SMU. After the 1972 season, he joined the Nebraska Cornhuskers as receivers coach, becoming offensive coordinator under coach Tom Osborne in 1978.

In 1979, at North Texas, Moore got his first head coaching job. After two seasons he left UNT for Texas Tech, where he spent five seasons and garnered a record of 16–37–2 before being replaced by David McWilliams. After two years away from football, Moore joined the coaching staff at Arkansas where he remained for five seasons before taking the head coaching position at Appalachian State in 1989.

On September 1, 2007, Jerry Moore led his Appalachian State football team to score one of the biggest upsets in college football history, defeating the then fifth-ranked Michigan Wolverines, 34–32, at Michigan Stadium. This marked the first time a team in a lower subdivision defeated a ranked team in a higher subdivision. It was also the first game and loss for Michigan against a Division I FCS team.[3] Moore had learned the spread offensive scheme that enabled him to defeat Michigan from then-West Virginia coach Rich Rodriguez, whom Michigan hired to succeed Lloyd Carr the following season.

Moore became the 28th head coach in Division I history to reach 200 wins after the Mountaineers defeated the Furman Paladins on October 25, 2008.[4]

Head coaching record

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl TSN[5] # Coaches°
North Texas Mean Green (Independent) (1979–1980)
1979 North Texas 5–6
1980 North Texas 6–5
North Texas: 11–11
Texas Tech Red Raiders (Southwest Conference) (1981–1985)
1981 Texas Tech 1–9–1 0–7–1
1982 Texas Tech 4–7 3–5
1983 Texas Tech 3–7–1 3–4–1
1984 Texas Tech 4–7 2–6
1985 Texas Tech 4–7 1–7
Texas Tech: 16–37–2 9–29–2
Appalachian State Mountaineers (Southern Conference) (1989–present)
1989 Appalachian State 9–3 5–2 2nd L 24–21 vs. Middle Tennessee State I-AA First Round 7
1990 Appalachian State 6–5 5–2 2nd
1991 Appalachian State 8–4 6–1 1st L 14–13 vs. Eastern Kentucky I-AA First Round 10
1992 Appalachian State 7–5 5–2 2nd L 35–10 vs. Middle Tennessee State I-AA First Round 16
1993 Appalachian State 4–7 4–4 4th
1994 Appalachian State 9–4 6–2 2nd L 17–14 vs. Boise State I-AA Quarterfinals 9
1995 Appalachian State 12–1 8–0 1st L 27–17 vs. Stephen F. Austin I-AA Quarterfinals 5
1996 Appalachian State 7–4 5–3 4th 22
1997 Appalachian State 7–4 6–2 2nd 22
1998 Appalachian State 10–3 6–2 2nd L 31–20 vs. Northwestern State I-AA Quarterfinals 6
1999 Appalachian State 9–3 7–1 T–1st L 44–29 vs. Florida A&M I-AA First Round T–9
2000 Appalachian State 10–4 6–2 2nd L 19–16 (OT) vs. Montana I-AA Semifinals 4
2001 Appalachian State 9–4 6–2 2nd L 38–24 vs. Georgia Southern I-AA Quarterfinals 4
2002 Appalachian State 8–4 6–2 2nd L 14–13 vs. Maine I-AA First Round 10
2003 Appalachian State 7–4 6–2 2nd
2004 Appalachian State 6–5 4–3 3rd
2005 Appalachian State 12–3 6–1 1st W 21–16 vs. Northern Iowa I-AA Championship 1
2006 Appalachian State 14–1 7–0 1st W 28–17 vs. Massachusetts FCS Championship 1
2007 Appalachian State 13–2 5–2 T–1st W 49–21 vs. Delaware FCS Championship 1 1
2008 Appalachian State 11–3 8–0 1st L 33–13 vs. Richmond FCS Quarterfinals 5 5
2008 Appalachian State 11–3 8–0 1st L 24–17 vs. Montana FCS Semifinals 3 T–3
Appalachian State: 189–76 125–35
Total: 216–124–2
      National Championship         Conference Title         Conference Division Title

References


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