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Jerry Stackhouse
JerryStackhouse.jpg
Milwaukee Bucks  – No. 24
Guard/Forward
Born November 5, 1974 (1974-11-05) (age 35)
Kinston, North Carolina
Nationality American
Listed height 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m)
Listed weight 218 lb (99 kg)
League NBA
College North Carolina
Draft 3rd overall, 1995
Philadelphia 76ers
Pro career 1995–present
Former teams Philadelphia 76ers (1995–1998)
Detroit Pistons (1998–2002)
Washington Wizards (2002–2004)
Dallas Mavericks (2004–2009)
Awards 1996 NBA All-Rookie Team
2-time NBA All-Star (2000, 2001)
Profile Info Page

Jerry Darnell Stackhouse (born November 5, 1974 in Kinston, North Carolina) is an American professional basketball player who plays both shooting guard and small forward for the Milwaukee Bucks.

Contents

Early career

Stackhouse was a premier player from the time he was a sophomore in high school. He was the state player of the year for North Carolina in 1991-1992, leading Kinston (N.C) High School to the state finals. His senior year, he played for Oak Hill Academy with future college teammate Jeff McInnis, leading them to an undefeated season. He was a two-time first team Parade All-America selection, and was the MVP of the McDonald's Game. At the 1992 Nike Camp, was considered along with Rasheed Wallace to be the top player at the camp.

NBA Draft

Stackhouse attended the University of North Carolina, where he was a teammate of fellow future NBAer Rasheed Wallace. Stackhouse declared his eligibility for the 1995 NBA Draft following his sophomore season with the Tar Heels. He was selected in the first round of the 1995 NBA Draft with the third pick by the Philadelphia 76ers. At one time he was called the "Next Jordan" since both players played at North Carolina, both players went #3 in the draft, both were listed at the same height -- 6' 6" -- and looked similar in appearance and game, and both had a taller power forward from UNC drafted immediately after them in the #4 spot (in Jordan's case, it was Sam Perkins, and in Stackhouse's case, the player was Rasheed Wallace.)

NBA career

In his first season with the 76ers, Stackhouse led his team with a 19.2 points per game (PPG) average, and was named to the NBA's All-Rookie team. In the 1996-97 season, the 76ers also drafted Allen Iverson. Combined, the two posted 44.2 points per game for the Sixers.

Midway through the 1997-98 season, Stackhouse was dealt to the Detroit Pistons with Eric Montross for Theo Ratliff, Aaron McKie and future considerations. By the 1999-2000 season, his second full season with the Pistons, Stackhouse was averaging 23.6 points per game. A year later, he had a career-high average of 29.8 points per game. In a late season victory over the Chicago Bulls, he set the Pistons' franchise record and the league's season high for points in a game with 57. Stackhouse saw his final action as a Piston with Detroit's elimination in the second round of the 2001-02 NBA playoffs.

During the 2002 offseason, Stackhouse was traded to the Washington Wizards in a six-player deal, also involving Richard Hamilton.

In his first season with Washington (2002-03), Stackhouse led the Wizards in points and assists per game with 21.5 and 4.5 respectively. He missed most of the 2003-04 season while recovering from arthroscopic surgery on his right knee, playing in only 26 games.

In the 2004 offseason, Stackhouse—along with Christian Laettner and the Wizards' first-round draft pick (Devin Harris)—was traded to the Dallas Mavericks in exchange for Antawn Jamison. He did not play for 41 games during his first two seasons with Dallas due to groin and continued knee problems, and played mostly the role sixth man. During the 2004-05 playoffs, Stackhouse began wearing pressure stockings during games to keep his legs warm to aid his groin injury and hold his thigh sleeves in place; also allows for better blood flow to the legs; the practice quickly became a trend among NBA players, with Kobe Bryant, Dwyane Wade, LeBron James and others adopting pressure stockings the following season.

Stackhouse was still coming off the bench as the 6th man for the Dallas Mavericks during the 2005-06 NBA season, however he was a significant factor in the NBA Finals series with the Dallas Mavericks against the Miami Heat. The Mavericks suffered, however, when Stackhouse was suspended for Game 5 for a flagrant foul on Shaquille O'Neal, and the Heat eventually won the series 4-2. Stackhouse was the third player from the Mavericks suspended during the 2006 playoffs (Jason Terry was suspended for one game for punching San Antonio Spurs guard Michael Finley in the groin and DJ Mbenga was suspended six games for walking into the stands during Game 4 of the NBA Western Conference Finals). In February 2008 Stackhouse was one of the players intended for the trade for Jason Kidd from the Nets. After he was traded, he was going to get bought out by the Nets and resign with the Mavericks, but since Stackhouse did not keep this under the table, the league banned Stackhouse from resigning with the Mavericks after a buyout, so the trade never happened with Stackhouse a part of it. (The Kidd deal did eventually happen though)

During the first round of the 2008 NBA Playoffs between the Mavericks and the New Orleans Hornets, Stackhouse had some harsh words for Hornets coach Byron Scott. In a radio interview, Stackhouse said the following:

"I think it's just about having personalities that mesh and I think Chris (Paul) is such a great guy, I think he's been able to kind of deal with Byron Scott. I don't think Byron Scott is the best coach or I don't think he's the best guy to deal with -- you know what I'm sayin? -- from some things that I've heard from other players and just some dealings that I had with him earlier in the season. I was about ready to kick his ass -- you know what I'm sayin? He was sitting on the sideline and we just got into a little conversation or something and he was going to tell me, you know, 'Talk to me when you get a ring.' I was like, I told that fool, 'If I played with Magic and Worthy and Kareem I'd have a ring, too. So, you know, he's a sucker in my book, but that's a whole other story."[1]

Stackhouse was traded to the Memphis Grizzlies on July 8, 2009, in a four way trade. On the day after the trade, Stackhouse was waived by the Grizzlies.[2] On January 17, 2010, the Milwaukee Bucks signed Stackhouse for the remainder of the 2009–10 season.[3]

Family

Stackhouse is the younger brother of former CBA player and one-time Sacramento Kings and Boston Celtics forward Tony Dawson[4], and the uncle of former Wake Forest University guard Craig Dawson.[5]

Trivia

NBA career statistics

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field-goal percentage  3P%  3-point field-goal percentage  FT%  Free-throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

Regular season

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1995–96 Philadelphia 72 71 37.5 .414 .318 .747 3.7 3.9 1.1 1.1 19.2
1996–97 Philadelphia 81 81 39.1 .407 .298 .766 4.2 3.1 1.1 .8 20.7
1997–98 Philadelphia 22 22 34.0 .452 .348 .802 3.5 3.0 1.4 .9 16.0
1997–98 Detroit 57 15 31.5 .428 .208 .782 3.3 3.1 1.0 .7 15.7
1998–99 Detroit 42 9 28.3 .371 .278 .850 2.5 2.8 .8 .4 14.5
1999–00 Detroit 82 82 38.4 .428 .288 .815 3.8 4.5 1.3 .4 23.6
2000–01 Detroit 80 80 40.2 .402 .351 .822 3.9 5.1 1.2 .7 29.8
2001–02 Detroit 76 76 35.3 .397 .287 .858 4.1 5.3 1.0 .5 21.4
2002–03 Washington 70 70 39.2 .409 .290 .878 3.7 4.5 .9 .4 21.5
2003–04 Washington 26 17 29.8 .399 .354 .806 3.6 4.0 .9 .1 13.9
2004–05 Dallas 56 7 28.9 .414 .267 .849 3.3 2.3 .9 .2 14.9
2005–06 Dallas 55 11 27.7 .401 .277 .882 2.8 2.9 .7 .2 13.0
2006–07 Dallas 67 8 24.1 .428 .383 .847 2.2 2.8 .8 .2 12.0
2007–08 Dallas 58 13 24.3 .405 .326 .892 2.3 2.5 .5 .2 10.7
2008–09 Dallas 10 1 16.2 .267 .158 1.000 1.7 1.2 .4 .1 4.2
2009–10 Milwaukee 5 0 19.2 .419 .250 1.000 2.8 2.4 1.2 .0 6.8
Career 859 563 33.3 .409 .306 .822 3.4 3.6 1.0 .5 18.4
All-Star 2 0 14.5 .467 1.000 .000 1.5 2.0 .0 .0 7.5

Playoffs

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1998–99 Detroit 5 0 24.8 .391 .250 .857 1.6 1.2 .4 .2 10.0
1999–00 Detroit 3 3 40.0 .407 .429 .742 4.0 3.3 .7 .0 24.7
2001–02 Detroit 10 10 36.1 .321 .340 .825 4.3 4.3 .6 .6 17.6
2004–05 Dallas 13 0 31.0 .386 .400 .864 4.1 2.3 .6 .2 16.1
2005–06 Dallas 22 1 32.3 .402 .338 .784 2.8 2.5 .6 .3 13.7
2006–07 Dallas 6 0 28.2 .348 .355 .879 3.7 2.5 .7 .2 14.3
2007–08 Dallas 5 2 20.4 .316 .167 1.000 3.2 1.2 .2 .0 6.2
Career 64 16 31.1 .374 .343 .825 3.4 2.6 .6 .3 14.5

References

External links








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