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Neopaganism
 
Systems
Animism · Shamanism · Paganism · Pantheism · Polytheism
Religions
Celtic (CR · Neo-druidism) · Dievturība  · Finnish · Heathenism (Asatru · Theodism) · Hellenic Neopaganism · Jewitchery · Kemetism · Rodnovery · Roman · Romuva · Stregheria · Feraferia · Wicca
Approaches
Reconstructionism · Ethnocentrism · Neotribalism · Neoshamanism · Eclecticism · Technopaganism · Witchcraft

Judeo-Paganism, Jewitchery (from the terms Jew and witch), or Jewish Neopaganism is a term for a hypothetical combination of Neopaganism and Judaism. The possibility of the concept was discussed in 1994 in series of articles in Green Egg, a US-based Neopagan magazine.

Judeo-Paganism would be expected to merge Judaism, Neopaganism, the Kabbalah and polytheistic Canaanite religion. While there appear to be some online discussion groups and personal websites on the topic, no actual organizations are known.

Nurit Zaidman identifies it as a postmodern form of Jewish feminism.[1]

Purportedly, there exists a Judeo-Pagan group in Israel, known as Am Ha Aretz (עם הארץ, lit. "People of the Land", a rabbinical term for uneducated and religiously unobservant Jews), "Amha" for short. Elie Sheva, according to his own testimony an "elected leader of AMHA" reportedly founded an US branch of the group, known as "Primitive Hebrew Assembly".[2]

Contents

See also

Notes

  1. ^ 'Modern Judaism' journal on JSToR
  2. ^ Interview with Elie in Being a Pagan: Druids, Wiccans, and Witches Today, by Ellen Evert Hopman and Lawrence Bond (2001), p. 105.

References

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Books

  • The Encyclopedia of Women and Religion in North America by Rosemary Skinner Keller (Editor), Rosemary Radford Ruether (Editor), Marie Cantlon (Editor) - Indiana University Press (April 4, 2006) ISBN 0253346851, ISBN 978-0253346858
  • Magic of the Ordinary: Recovering the Shamanic in Judaism by Rabbi Gershon Winkler - North Atlantic Books (January 10, 2003) ISBN 1556434448, ISBN 978-1556434440
  • Magickal Judaism: Connecting Pagan & Jewish Practice by Jennifer Hunter - Citadel (July 1, 2006) ISBN 0806525762, ISBN 978-0806525761
  • van der Toorn, Karel (1995). Dictionary of Deities and Demons in the Bible.. New York: E.J. Brill. ISBN 0-80282-491-9.  

Articles

External links


 
Systems
AnimismTemplate:· ShamanismTemplate:· Paganism
PantheismTemplate:· Polytheism
Religions
Celtic (CRTemplate:· Neo-druidism)
Dievturība Template:· Finnish
Heathenism (AsatruTemplate:· Theodism)
Hellenic NeopaganismTemplate:· JewitcheryTemplate:· Kemetism
RodnoveryTemplate:· RomanTemplate:· Romuva
StregheriaTemplate:· FeraferiaTemplate:· Wicca
Approaches
ReconstructionismTemplate:· Ethnocentrism
NeotribalismTemplate:· Neoshamanism
EclecticismTemplate:· Technopaganism
Witchcraft

Jewitch (from the terms Jew and witch) or Jewish Neopaganism is a religious movement that seeks to create an earth-based religion for the Jewish people. It mixes principles of Judaism, Neopaganism and the Kabbalah. Jewitches explore the origins of the Jewish religion and its ancient neighbors, the Canaanites and Canaanite religion, Phoenicians, Assyrians, Babylonians, Ugarit folk, and Egyptians.

Jewitch religious groups are generally small, often linked with one another and often organized into "circles". Many of these "circles" of Jewitches are often discussion groups. Central in Jewitch philosophy is The Hebrew Goddess, and the concept of Shekhinah. The question of Lilith in the Jewish tradition; and the monotheism/pantheism of Judaism.

Contents

Jewish tribal identity

Some might consider "Jewitch" a contradiction in terms, as many define a Pagan as a member of a non-Abrahamic religion (that is, a religion that is neither Jewish, Christian nor Muslim). However, being a Jew is an issue of tribal identity rather than belief; the child of a Jewish mother, or a non-Jew who converts to Judaism (and therefore joins the Jewish people), is a Jew (a "member of the tribe") regardless of their beliefs. Judaism is the religion of the Jewish people, and a Jew who adopts a Pagan religion and/or practices Pagan ritual might be considered by mainstream Jews to be in violation of Jewish law, perhaps even a heretic, but is still a Jew nonetheless. One who merely adopts the traditions and beliefs of Judaism without converting is not considered to be a Jew.[1]

(See also: Who is a Jew)

History

Jewitchery is an outgrowth of the New Age and Neopagan movements of the 1970s USA.

Some Jewitch groups, such as the Order of the Temple of Astarte, have been around since the 1970s. It is considered[citation needed] that many Jewish Pagan groups are offshoots of either Reconstructionist Judaism, Neopaganism or both. Nurit Zaidman identifies it as a postmodern form of Jewish feminism, and thus relates it to modern Jewish feminsm'Modern Judaism' journal on Jstor.

Amha

One Israeli nature-based spiritual group is known as Am Ha Aretz, "Amha" for short, which means "People of the Land". Like the term pagan, the term "Amha" has a history of being a derogatory term for "uncivilized people". The "Land" is the land of Israel, which is itself worshipped. Some members of Amha are polytheist, some are mystics and others are animists. They call themselves Hebrews, rather than Jews, to distinguish between Hebrews (pre-exile) and Jews (post exile/rabbinical traditions). The group considers itself to be reclaiming Hebrew tribal and animist traditions. In the Amha tradition, the gods are "Elohim", the spirits of warrior ancestors are "Rephaim", and the land spirits and those ancestor spirits that tie members to the land are "Teraphim".

See also

Notes

  1. ^ "Judaism as a Tribal Identity" by Jeff Rosenbaum; one of a series of articles on Jewish Paganism by various authors in Green Egg, Winter 1994 (Volume 27 #107)

References

Books

  • The Encyclopedia of Women and Religion in North America by Rosemary Skinner Keller (Editor), Rosemary Radford Ruether (Editor), Marie Cantlon (Editor) - Indiana University Press (April 4, 2006) ISBN 0253346851, ISBN 978-0253346858
  • Magic of the Ordinary: Recovering the Shamanic in Judaism by Rabbi Gershon Winkler - North Atlantic Books (January 10, 2003) ISBN 1556434448, ISBN 978-1556434440
  • Magickal Judaism: Connecting Pagan & Jewish Practice by Jennifer Hunter - Citadel (July 1, 2006) ISBN 0806525762, ISBN 978-0806525761

Articles

External links


Simple English

Jewitchery is a modern religion which has been based on minority beliefs. It started in the New Age beliefs of the 1970s.



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