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Jim Gibbons


Incumbent
Assumed office 
January 1, 2007
Lieutenant Brian Krolicki
Preceded by Kenny Guinn

In office
January 3, 1997 – December 31, 2006
Preceded by Barbara Vucanovich
Succeeded by Dean Heller

Born December 16, 1944 (1944-12-16) (age 65)
Sparks, Nevada
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Dawn Gibbons (filed for divorce on 2008-05-02)
Residence Reno, Nevada
Alma mater University of Nevada, Reno, Southwestern Law School
Profession Geologist, attorney, pilot
Religion The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Military service
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch United States Air Force
United States Air National Guard
Years of service 1967-1971
1975-1996
Rank US-O6 insignia.svg Colonel[1]
Battles/wars Vietnam War
Gulf War
Awards Legion of Merit
Distinguished Flying Cross

James Arthur "Jim" Gibbons (born December 16, 1944) is the 28th and current Governor of the U.S. state of Nevada. A Republican, he is a former member of the United States House of Representatives, having served from 1997 to 2006.

Contents

Biography

Born in Sparks, Nevada, Gibbons interrupted his studies at the University of Nevada, Reno during the Vietnam War to serve in the United States Air Force (1967–1971). He also attended Southwestern University School of Law, in Los Angeles, and the University of Southern California for post-graduate studies. A graduate of the U.S. Air Force Air Command and Staff College and the Air War College, he joined the Nevada Air National Guard in 1975 and served as its vice commander from 1990 to 1996, participating in the first Gulf War. During his military career, Gibbons earned nineteen service medals, including the Legion of Merit and Distinguished Flying Cross. In civilian life, he has worked as a lawyer in private practice, an airline pilot for both Western Airlines and Delta Air Lines, a hydrologist and a geologist. Gibbons is a nonpracticing Latter-day Saint; his wife Dawn is a Presbyterian.[2]

Personal life

Gibbons has been married twice and has three children. He married Dawn Gibbons in 1985; they have a son, born in 1987. Dawn Gibbons did not move to Washington to live with her husband while he served in Congress, saying she preferred to raise their son in Nevada. She herself was elected to the Nevada State Assembly in 1998, two years after Jim Gibbons was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. On May 2, 2008, Gibbons filed for divorce,[3][4] citing grounds of incompatibility stemming from an undisclosed event in Reno, and requesting the court to determine whether Gibbons or his wife would live at the governor's mansion.

In April 2009, Gibbons was living in Reno; his wife, Dawn, remained in the Governor's mansion in Carson City. An 1866 state law requires that governor must "keep his office and reside at the seat of government." A spokesman for Gibbons described the move by the governor back to the couple's Reno home, which they had owned since 1989, as a temporary situation and said there was no violation of the law.[5] By April 2009, Dawn was living in an apartment near the Mansion rather than in it.[6]

Divorce proceedings were stayed upon agreement of living separately pending the suit. Dawn accused Jim of "infatuation and involvement with the wife of a Reno doctor,” but he stated the woman is just a friend. On March-April 2007, he sent 860 text messages in one month to the woman.[7] He later reimbursed the state $130 for the cost of the messages.[6] In June 2008, he was seen with former Playboy model Leslie Durant at the Reno Rodeo.[8] Durant is particularly prominent not solely because of her nude Playboy appearance, because she was once married to Pete Sferrazza, formerly mayor of Reno, Nevada.[6]

On April 6, 2009, a judge in Washoe County Family Court ordered the records of the divorce proceedings unsealed. Dawn's papers alleged that Jim was unfaithful with Durant, and with the woman who received the 860 messages, and "has had similar relationships with many other women during the marriage."[6] She also referenced her humiliation at standing beside him when her husband attempted to defend himself from allegations of attempted sexual assault shortly before the 2006 election.[6] See "sexual assault allegation" below.

Jim Gibbons' divorce filings stated that he wanted his wife out of the Governor's Mansion because she was aggressive: "It was once said in another context that being in close quarters with such a volatile person was like being locked in a phone booth with an enraged ferret."[6]

In January 2010, the couple negotiated and completed a out-of-court divorce agreement. The presiding judge has yet to rule on the agreement but both parties consider themselves to be divorced.

Political career

Gibbons served in the Nevada State Assembly from 1989 to 1993, during which time he was called to active service in the Gulf War as an RF-4C Flight Leader. During the conflict, he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for extraordinary achievement while participating in a mission in which he flew his unarmed aircraft on a reconnaissance mission to acquire politically sensitive imagery of enemy targets in Kuwait.

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1994 gubernatorial election

While working as a pilot for Delta Air Lines and serving as an assemblyman in the Nevada House, Gibbons ran for Nevada governor in 1994. As the Republican nominee, he lost to Democratic incumbent Bob Miller, having received 156,875 votes to Miller's 200,026.

U.S. Congress

Gibbons was elected to the House of Representatives in 1996. He served eight years as Nevada's United States Representative in the 2nd congressional district. He served as vice chairman of the House Resources Committee, and he was a member of the Armed Services Committee, the Homeland Security Committee and the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. His long-time congressional Chief of Staff, Michael Dayton, was replaced in 2002 by legislative director Robert Uithoven. Uithoven served on Gibbons' staff for many years, including four years as chief of staff. He later served as campaign manager for Gibbons' successful 2006 Gubernatorial campaign. Uithoven was not given a gubernatorial position. His predecessor, Michael Dayton, was named as the new governor's top aide.

2006 gubernatorial election

Gibbons announced in late 2004 that he would not run for a sixth term in 2006, instead opting to run for Governor of Nevada. He won the August 15 party primary handily, defeating state senator Bob Beers and Lieutenant Governor Lorraine Hunt. In the general election (described as "most contentious, ugly and negative in history"[9]) he faced Democratic nominee Dina Titus, who was the Minority Leader in the Nevada State Senate. Gibbons received 278,984 votes to Titus' 255,675. Titus won Clark County, Nevada's most populous, but was beaten by Gibbons in every other county. Gibbons called Titus "an admirable opponent," although Titus declined to echo his sentiments, saying ""We disagree on basic policies, and neither one of us is going to change our minds for the other."[9]

Gibbons resigned his House seat on New Year's Eve, and was sworn in as governor just after midnight on New Year's Day, a highly irregular event in Nevada history. Many believe Gibbons did this in order to undo a late term appointment to the position of Nevada's Gaming Control Board Chairman by his predecessor, Governor Kenny Guinn.[10]

Gubernatorial initiatives

Yucca Mountain nuclear repository

In July, 2007, Gibbons approved a plan to let the U.S. Department of Energy use the state's water to explore the planned Yucca Mountain nuclear waste site.[11] According to the Las Vegas Sun, "Neither Gibbons nor his aides have offered public explanations for the governor’s perplexing moves. In particular, they have not explained how giving federal authorities more time to build a case for Yucca Mountain or appointing a Yucca advocate to the nuclear projects board could possibly be interpreted as being in line with the state’s opposition to the plan."[12] Sen. Harry Reid (D-NV) said "this amounts to surrendering in Nevada's decades-long fight against the project."[13] Rep. Shelley Berkley (D-NV) said “This demonstrates to me that he either doesn’t know what he’s doing or he’s reversed his position.”[12]

Mexican reimbursement

In August, 2007, Governor Gibbons attempted to obtain reimbursement for the health care of Mexican nationals from the Mexican government. He did not succeed.[14]

State budget

In October 2007, Gibbons proposed cutting funding for state services by 5% and ordered state agencies to submit lists of the services to be cut. Among the state agencies that were ordered to cut their budgets were the Nevada System of Higher Education, child welfare agencies and the juvenile justice agency.[15] Gibbons expected an $80 million dollar cut to come directly from the Health and Human services agency alone.[15] Most of these agencies refused to submit a revised budget to Governor Gibbons, citing already "threadbare" budgets.[15]

On November 21, 2007, Gibbons revised his proposal upward for cutting state budgets. Nevada agencies were then told to plan for 8% cuts.[16]

In 2008, Gibbons suggested that the Nevada legislature cut the state budget for elementary, secondary and higher education by 14%.[17][18][19][20][21] Jim Rogers, Nevada Chancellor for Education, said of the budget cuts, "We’re talking about something that is going to cripple us financially and competitively. The effects will be felt on our economy for the next 50 to 100 years." [22] The Nevada Policy Research Institute criticized the Governor's office for the budget, when the administration claimed that the state was facing a crisis, despite a 1 percent decrease in state spending.[23]

On June 1, 2009 Governor Gibbons veto of allowing domestic partnerships was overridden by both the state Assembly and the state Senate. Nevada have extend domestic partnerships that include all of the rights, responsibilities, obligations, benefits, etc of married couples. Domestic partnerships are open to both opposite sex couples and same sex couples over 18.[24] The law took effect on 1 October 2009. Marriage is still only allowed for opposite sex couples since a 2002 Nevada Constitutional amendment.

Criticism and controversy while Congressman

Plagiarism

A speech given in February 2005 by Rep. Gibbons in Elko, Nevada was actually plagiarized from a copyrighted speech delivered in 2003 by then-Alabama State Auditor Beth Chapman at a "Stand up America" rally.[25]

Allegations of favoring mining industry donors

In November 2005, Gibbons and Representative Richard Pombo (R-CA) co-authored an amendment to the Federal Budget Reconciliation Bill easing restrictions of sale of federal lands to mining companies. This amendment attracted fire from environmentalists, anti-growth advocates, and even some Republican Senators[26] concerned about the measure's effects on hunting and fishing. The bill (and amendment) narrowly passed the House, but the stated opposition of many Democratic Senators and the concerns voiced by Republican Senators make the amendment's future uncertain.

Federal bribery investigation

On November 1, 2006, the Wall Street Journal published a story stating that Gibbons had earmarked several millions of dollars to a company owned by Warren Trepp, as well as added additional funds to a pre-existing government contract with Trepp's company. The report noted that Trepp had paid for a $10,000 cruise for Gibbons and his wife, which Gibbons failed to report, and $100,000 in campaign contributions. A former Trepp business partner claimed that Gibbons was also given gambling chips – convertible into cash – and cash directly.[27][28][29]

On February 15, 2007, the Journal reported that Gibbons was under federal investigation for allegedly accepting unreported gifts and/or payments from Trepp in exchange for official acts while he served in Congress (1997–2007).[27][28][30 ]

According to reports, on March 22, 2005, days before Trepp and his wife left for the Caribbean cruise with Gibbons and his family, Jalé Trepp, Warren’s wife, sent a reminder to her husband. It said, “Please don't forget to bring the money you promised Jim and Dawn (Gibbons).” Minutes later, Trepp responded, “Don't you ever send this kind of message to me! Erase this message from your computer right now!”[27][28][30 ]

The U.S. Attorney for Nevada at time of the investigation was Daniel Bogden, who was one of seven federal prosecutors forced out of his job by the Bush administration in December 2006.[27][28][30 ]

Criticism and controversy while Governor

Undocumented housekeeper/nanny

As Gibbons was campaigning for governor in October 2006, it was brought to light that more than ten years earlier, his ex-wife Dawn had employed Patricia Pastor Sandoval, a then-illegal immigrant from Peru, as a housekeeper and babysitter. Since the Zoe Baird "Nannygate" scandal of 1993, politicians have been deeply concerned about the impact of such revelations on their careers.

Dawn, who had become a Nevada state representative in 1998, denied the allegations in 2006, claiming that Sandoval had merely been a friend who had helped out around the house and was given clothing and household goods, but was not an employee. An employment contract from between Dawn Gibbons and Sandoval, however, appeared to disprove that assertion, as it clearly laid out the terms and conditions of Sandoval's hiring. Documents filed during Sandoval's 1988 application for working papers also contradicted earlier statements by Dawn Gibbons that the family had not known that the woman was in the United States illegally.[31]

Sandoval stated that she was employed from roughly 1987 to 1993, four years before Gibbons left for Washington in 1997 after his 1996 election as a Congressman and five years before Dawn Gibbons became a state legislator. Sandoval also stated that she was asked to hide in the basement and refrain from answering doors at certain times in order to ensure that her illegal status did not become public knowledge and jeopardize Gibbons' political career.

In 1995, Dawn Gibbons filed a police complaint against Sandoval, alleging that she was attempting to extort money by threatening to go to the media with a story involving her illegal employment. Jim and Dawn Gibbons did not pursue the matter further.[31]

In response to the 2006 revelations, Jim Gibbons' campaign issued a statement accusing Democratic candidate Dina Titus of fomenting the controversy to distract from the real issues of the race, but did not issue a denial of Sandoval's claims.[31]

Sexual assault allegation

In October 2006, near the conclusion of his successful campaign for governor, a woman accused Jim Gibbons of attempted sexual assault in a parking garage. Gibbons claimed he was helping her to her car. They both admitted to drinking alcohol at McCormick and Schmick's restaurant in Las Vegas.

In the initial aftermath of the event, Las Vegas Sheriff Bill Young, a long time supporter of Jim Gibbons and donor to his gubernatorial campaign, cited lack of evidence in the case and refused to bring evidence of the attack to the District Attorney. The accuser did not initially want to pursue pressing charges, saying she just wanted "to be left alone." But when the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department was forced to open the incident case file after inquiries by Las Vegas media, the Las Vegas Review Journal and the Las Vegas Sun released her name and she was thrust into the public eye. She later said she was being pressured to not talk to the police about the incident by people close to Jim Gibbons.[32] In fact, the Gibbons campaign hired a private investigator to "talk" to the woman shortly after the incident occurred.[33]

Under pressure from the media and eventually from the accuser herself, Sheriff Bill Young famously taunted the alleged victim to "bring it on" and sign a formal complaint. This was a highly irregular step, as most victims of assault are not required to sign a complaint before an investigation can begin. Nevertheless, she signed the complaint and there was a further investigation. The evidence was given to the Las Vegas District Attorney, David Roger, who had also donated to the Gibbons campaign. Criminal charges were never filed in the case.[34]

Gibbons' gubernatorial campaign manager, Robert Uithoven, speculated in an e-mail to Gibbons' supporters that Dina Titus, Gibbons' opponent, hired the woman to entice Gibbons. Titus retorted that to do this she would have had to control where Gibbons went, who he was with, and even the weather (Gibbons claimed he was helping the woman to her car in part because of the weather).[35]

By 2009, the alleged victim had filed a civil suit against Jim Gibbons, specifically alleging battery, false imprisonment and second-degree kidnapping as well as deceit about the episode.[6]

Undeclared donations

Gibbons set up a legal defense fund just before the November, 2006 gubernatorial election to help pay for legal expenses incurred after a woman accused him of attempted sexual assault. Gibbons neither reported the legal defense fund to the appropriate U.S. House of Representatives committee (even though he was a sitting congressman at the time and was required by House rules to do so), nor did he report donations to his legal defense fund as contributions to his gubernatorial campaign, citing the money was for "personal use" and not for "political purposes."[36]

In January 2008, it was reported that Gibbons raised $256,000 for his legal defense fund during 2007, including a $61,000 personal loan Gibbons gave to his own fund, as well as $10,000 from The Palms hotel and casino, and $40,000 from various companies connected to Las Vegas Sands Corporation Chief Executive Sheldon Adelson.[37] The defense fund has spent money to defend Gibbons in cases which include:

  • Investigations into the allegations that Gibbons secured defense contracts for his friend Warren Trepp in exchange for gifts and money during his time in Congress, 1997-2006.
  • A nepotism scandal regarding Sierra Nevada Corporation's hire of Nevada first lady Dawn Gibbons as a consultant. Sierra Nevada paid Dawn Gibbons $35,000 at the same time Jim Gibbons helped the company get a no-bid federal contract.
  • Gibbons' alleged attempted sexual assault of a Las Vegas woman in 2006
  • Questions about Gibbons' employment of an illegal immigrant as a nanny[38]

Interference with an ongoing investigation

On August 3, 2007, the Las Vegas Review Journal printed the following:

A newly available document states that Gov. Jim Gibbons "has admitted" that he urged federal authorities to pursue criminal action against a software developer whose business dispute with a friend of Gibbons has prompted a federal investigation. The statement is made in a legal motion filed last year, but kept secret until Tuesday, when it was unsealed at a judge's order.[39]

Lamoille Land Deal

In 2007, Governor Gibbons and wife Dawn purchased 40 acres of land in the ranch county of Lamoille, which belonged to Nevada Judge Jerry Carr Whitehead. The Elko County Assessor said he felt pressure from the governor and the governor's lawyer to lower the tax liability. Under state law, such an agricultural tax break goes only to legitimate farm and ranch operations, and must generate at least $5,000 a year in income. If such a land is developed by million-dollar homes, property taxes would go up. "To say I was put in an awkward position I think is an understatement," Joe Aguirre, a Republican, told The Associated Press in 2008.[40] The editorial page of the Las Vegas Review-Journal said the deal might constitute fraud.[41]

Dedication to office

While the state faces an economic slowdown and steep budget cuts, Gibbons is facing criticism from officials for spending less time at his office. The Las Vegas Sun reviewed Gibbons’ attendance and discovered that he was only in his Capitol office five days in August 2008 and never for a full eight hours. In September, he was in his office a total of seven days.

In an interview with Las Vegas Sun reporters, Gibbons said “I never knew this job had a time frame on it that requires me to be sitting behind a desk at a certain hour.” He also said that he works about 60 hours a week for the state. Previous Nevada governors were also interviewed and they said that they felt it was necessary that they spent most of their time in the office.[42]

Gibbons' dedication to his office was called into question again six months later. On April 2, 2009, while appearing before a legislative panel to promote his renewable energy bill, Gibbons pulled out his cellphone and began texting. News stories used this incident to revisit the 860 messages he sent to his alleged paramour, and a 37-second video of him halting the hearing as he was introducing himself to the panel in order to send the text message was posted on YouTube.[43]

Popularity

Polling conducted in June 2008 indicated an all-time low 10% approval rating, with 59% disapproving.[44]

Beliefs and ideologies

Civil liberties

  • Voted YES on Constitutionally defining marriage as one-man-one-woman. (Jul 2006)
  • Voted YES on constitutional amendment prohibiting flag desecration. (Jun 2003)
  • Rated 7% by the ACLU, indicating what the group considers an "anti-civil liberties" voting record. (Dec 2002)
  • Voted YES on making the PATRIOT Act permanent. (Dec 2005)[45]

Education

As governor

In January 2007, Governor Gibbons asked Nevada lawmakers to approve his budget that cut the percentage of education funding in Nevada to increase the percentage for public safety and human services programs.[46]

In 2008, Gibbons suggested that the Nevada legislature cut the state general fund budget for elementary, secondary and higher education by 14% (this does not include federal or local revenues, or funds for construction or teacher penions).[17][18][47][48][49] Jim Rogers, Nevada Chancellor for Education, said of the budget cuts, "We’re talking about something that is going to cripple us financially and competitively. The effects will be felt on our economy for the next 50 to 100 years."[50]

As congressman

  • Rated 10% by the NEA, indicating what the group considers "anti-public education spending" votes.[51]
  • Voted YES on allowing prayer in public schools during the War on Terror.[51]
  • Voted YES on letting public schools display the words "God Bless America."[51]
  • Supports a Constitutional Amendment for prayer in public schools.[51]
  • Gibbons supports "No Child Left Behind."[52]

Taxes

As governor

Jim Gibbons pledged during his 1996 campaign for governor to not impose new taxes on businesses or individuals in Nevada.[53] Some businesses asked for tax increases to pay for new roads in Nevada, but Gibbons did not acquiesce.[54]

As congressman

  • Voted YES on replacing illegal export tax breaks with $140B in new breaks. (Jun 2004)
  • Voted YES on Bankruptcy Overhaul requiring partial debt repayment. (Mar 2001)[55]
  • Voted YES on Tax cut package of $958 B over 10 years. (May 2001)
  • Voted YES on eliminating the Estate Tax ("death tax"). (Apr 2001)
  • Voted YES on eliminating the "marriage penalty". (Jul 2000)
  • Rated 67% by NTU, indicating "Satisfactory" on tax votes. (Dec 2003)

Quotations

  • "Tree-hugging, Birkenstock-wearing, hippie, tie-dyed liberals… go make their movies and their music and whine somewhere else…. It's just too damn bad we didn't buy them a ticket [to become human shields in Iraq]."[56]
  • "Anybody who is against that [corporate-funded inaugural bashes] obviously must be a communist."[57]
  • "... I learned an important lesson, never to offer a helping hand to anybody ever again", following the alleged assault on the woman in the parking lot in October 2006.[58]
  • "I would have loved to have been the committee chairman and when the choice was made to go with Pete Hoekstra (R-Mich.), of course that disappointed me...but as my mother would say, when one door closes, another opens up",[59] regarding Gibbons' non-selection for chair of the House Intelligence Committee, and the possibility that he could instead run for Governor.

Electoral history

Nevada Gubernatorial Election 2006
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Jim Gibbons 278,998 47.9
Democratic Dina Titus 255,684 43.9

References

  1. ^ "Governor Jim Gibbons' Biography". State of Nevada. http://gov.state.nv.us/Govbio.htm. Retrieved 9 November 2009.  
  2. ^ Inaccuracy Fixed: Gibbons Mystified by Inaccurate Listing – Las Vegas Review Journal 5/19/06
  3. ^ The Las Vegas Review Journal
  4. ^ USA Today
  5. ^ Riley, Brendan (May 2, 2008). "Nevada governor files for divorce". The Orange County Register (Associated Press). http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/N/NV_GOVERNORS_DIVORCE_CAOL-?SITE=CAANR&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT. Retrieved 2008-05-03.  
  6. ^ a b c d e f g Divorce filings accuse Nevada governor of affairs, April 7, 2009, Associated Press report by Sandra Chereb and Scott Sonner.
  7. ^ news.yahoo.com Paper: Nev. gov. sent 860 texts to woman in month
  8. ^ Nevada Appeal
  9. ^ a b Ely News
  10. ^ Nevada Appeal
  11. ^ State of Nevada Press Release
  12. ^ a b Las Vegas Sun
  13. ^ Las Vegas Review Journal
  14. ^ The Las Vegas Sun
  15. ^ a b c "Rogers, county officials defy Gibbons on budget cut lists", Las Vegas Review Journal.
  16. ^ "Nev. govt. agencies told to plan for 8% cuts" Associated Press
  17. ^ a b Next budget expected to be cut to the bone The Las Vegas Sun
  18. ^ a b As troubles mount, Gibbons disengages The Las Vegas Sun
  19. ^ Tension builds as Gibbons cloaks budget cuts in secrecy The Las Vegas Sun
  20. ^ Gibbons calls for more Nevada budget cuts The Las Vegas Sun
  21. ^ http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2007/apr/03/gibbons-tax-breaks-run-smack-into-reality/ The Las Vegas Sun
  22. ^ [http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2008/may/30/rogers-boils-over/ Rogers boils over: Chancellor says governor wounds education, won’t return his calls] The Las Vegas Sun
  23. ^ "Handicapping the Debate" Nevada Policy Research Institute
  24. ^ CNNPolitics http://edition.cnn.hu/2009/POLITICS/05/31/nevada.domestic.partnerships/index.html?iref=hpmostpop
  25. ^ The Las Vegas Review Journal
  26. ^ Gov Exec
  27. ^ a b c d TPM Muckraker
  28. ^ a b c d NY Times
  29. ^ Las Vegas Review Journal
  30. ^ a b c Las Vegas Review Journal
  31. ^ a b c KLAS
  32. ^ The Las Vegas Review Journal
  33. ^ The Las Vegas Review Journal
  34. ^ The Las Vegas Review Journal
  35. ^ Reporter Steve Sebelius, October 23, 2006.
  36. ^ The Las Vegas Review Journal
  37. ^ Gibbons' '07 legal defense funds: $256,000 - Money includes $61,000 personal loan from governor, Las Vegas Review Journal.
  38. ^ Gibbons' '07 legal defense funds: $256,000 - Money includes $61,000 personal loan from governor, January 18, 2008, Las Vegas Review-Journal.
  39. ^ News Bank
  40. ^ A.P. News
  41. ^ Editorial: Governor's Land Deal, July 22, 2008, Las Vegas Review-Journal.
  42. ^ Where does Gibbons work? Apparently not at his desk, Las Vegas Sun.
  43. ^ Gibbons gets more news time with texting video, April 5, 2009, Reno Gazette Journal.
  44. ^ Vogel, Ed (2008-06-13). "GOVERNING NEVADA: Disregard divorce, poll says". Las Vegas Review Journal. http://www.lvrj.com/news/19883914.html. Retrieved 2009-01-01.  
  45. ^ On the Issues
  46. ^ KLAS
  47. ^ Tension builds as Gibbons cloaks budget cuts in secrecy The Las Vegas Sun
  48. ^ Gibbons calls for more Nevada budget cuts The Las Vegas Sun
  49. ^ Gibbons tax breaks run smack into reality The Las Vegas Sun
  50. ^ Rogers boils over: Chancellor says governor wounds education, won’t return his calls The Las Vegas Sun
  51. ^ a b c d On the Issues
  52. ^ New York times
  53. ^ Nevada Appeal
  54. ^ Nevada Appeal
  55. ^ On the Issues
  56. ^ Demanding an Apology – Fox News 3/4/05
  57. ^ Corporate cash backs Bush inaugural bash – MSNBC, 1/19/05
  58. ^ MSNBC
  59. ^ Gibbons Mulls Bid For Governor – Reno Gazette Journal, 1/13/05

External links

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Barbara Vucanovich
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Nevada's 2nd congressional district

January 3, 1997–December 31, 2006
Succeeded by
Dean Heller
Political offices
Preceded by
Kenny Guinn
Governor of Nevada
2007–present
Incumbent

Template:Infobox Governor James Arthur "Jim" Gibbons (born December 16, 1944) is the 28th and current governor of the U.S. state of Nevada. A Republican, he is a former member of the United States House of Representatives, having served from 1997 to 2006.

Contents

Biography

Born in Sparks, Nevada, Gibbons interrupted his studies at the University of Nevada, Reno during the Vietnam War to serve in the United States Air Force (1967–1971). He also attended Southwestern University School of Law, in Los Angeles, and the University of Southern California for post-graduate studies. A graduate of the U.S. Air Force Air Command and Staff College and the Air War College, he joined the Nevada Air National Guard in 1975 and served as its vice commander from 1990 to 1996, participating in the first Gulf War. During his military career, Gibbons earned nineteen service medals, including the Legion of Merit and Distinguished Flying Cross. In civilian life, he has worked as a lawyer in private practice, an airline pilot for both Western Airlines and Delta Air Lines, a hydrologist and a geologist. Gibbons is a nonpracticing Latter-day Saint; his wife Dawn is a Presbyterian.[1]

Personal life

Gibbons has been married twice and has three children. He married his current wife, Dawn Gibbons, in 1985; they have a son, born in 1987. Dawn Gibbons did not move to Washington to live with her husband during the 10 years he served in Congress, saying she preferred to raise their son in Nevada. She herself was elected to the Nevada State Assembly in 1998, two years after Jim Gibbons was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. On May 2 2008, Gibbons filed for divorce,[2][3] citing grounds of incompatibility stemming from an undisclosed event in Reno, and requesting the court to determine whether Gibbons or his wife would live at the governor's mansion.

In April 2009, Gibbons was living in Reno; his wife, Dawn, remained in the Governor's mansion in Carson City. An 1866 state law requires that governor must "keep his office and reside at the seat of government." A spokesman for Gibbons described the move by the governor back to the couple's Reno home, which they had owned since 1989, as a temporary situation and said there was no violation of the law.[4] By April 2009, Dawn was living in an apartment near the Mansion rather than in it.[5]

Divorce proceedings were stayed upon agreement of living separately pending the suit. Dawn accused Jim of "infatuation and involvement with the wife of a Reno doctor,” but he stated the woman is just a friend. On March-April 2007, he sent 860 text messages in one month to the woman.[6] He later reimbursed the state $130 for the cost of the messages.[5] In June 2008, he was seen with former Playboy model Leslie Durant at the Reno Rodeo.[7] Durant is particularly prominent not solely because of her nude Playboy appearance, because she was once married to Pete Sferrazza, formerly mayor of Reno.[5]

On April 6, 2009, a judge in Washoe County Family Court ordered the records of the divorce proceedings unsealed. Dawn's papers alleged that Jim was unfaithful with Durant, and with the woman who received the 860 messages, and "has had similar relationships with many other women during the marriage."[5] She also referenced her humiliation at standing beside him when her husband attempted to defend himself from allegations of attempted sexual assault shortly before the 2006 election.[5] See "sexual assault allegation" below.

Jim Gibbons' divorce filings stated that he wanted his wife out of the Governor's Mansion because she was aggressive: "It was once said in another context that being in close quarters with such a volatile person was like being locked in a phone booth with an enraged ferret."[5]

Political career

Gibbons served in the Nevada State Assembly from 1989 to 1993, during which time he was called to active service in the Gulf War as an RF-4C Flight Leader. During the conflict, he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for extraordinary achievement while participating in a mission in which he flew his unarmed aircraft on a reconnaissance mission to acquire politically sensitive imagery of enemy targets in Kuwait.

1994 gubernatorial election

While working as a pilot for Delta Air Lines and serving as an assemblyman in the Nevada House, Gibbons ran for Nevada governor in 1994. As the Republican nominee, he lost to Democratic incumbent Bob Miller, having received 156,875 votes to Miller's 200,026.

U.S. Congress

Gibbons was elected to the House of Representatives in 1996. He served eight years as Nevada's United States Representative in the 2nd congressional district. He served as vice chairman of the House Resources Committee, and he was a member of the Armed Services Committee, the Homeland Security Committee and the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. His long-time congressional Chief of Staff, Michael Dayton, was replaced in 2002 by legislative director Robert Uithoven. Uithoven served on Gibbons' staff for many years, including four years as chief of staff. He later served as campaign manager for Gibbons' successful 2006 Gubernatorial campaign. Uithoven was not given a gubernatorial position. His predecessor, Michael Dayton, was named as the new governor's top aide.

2006 gubernatorial election

Gibbons announced in late 2004 that he would not run for a sixth term in 2006, instead opting to run for Governor of Nevada. He won the August 15 party primary handily, defeating state senator Bob Beers and Lieutenant Governor Lorraine Hunt. In the general election (described as "most contentious, ugly and negative in history"[8]) he faced Democratic nominee Dina Titus, who was the Minority Leader in the Nevada State Senate. Gibbons received 278,984 votes to Titus' 255,675. Titus won Clark County, Nevada's most populous, but was beaten by Gibbons in every other county. Gibbons called Titus "an admirable opponent," although Titus declined to echo his sentiments, saying ""We disagree on basic policies, and neither one of us is going to change our minds for the other."[8]

Gibbons resigned his House seat on New Year's Eve, and was sworn in as governor just after midnight on New Year's Day, a highly irregular event in Nevada history. Many believe Gibbons did this in order to undo a late term appointment to the position of Nevada's Gaming Control Board Chairman by his predecessor, Governor Kenny Guinn.[9]

Gubernatorial initiatives

Yucca Mountain nuclear repository

In July, 2007, Gibbons approved a plan to let the U.S. Department of Energy use the state's water to explore the planned Yucca Mountain nuclear waste site.[10] According to the Las Vegas Sun, "Neither Gibbons nor his aides have offered public explanations for the governor’s perplexing moves. In particular, they have not explained how giving federal authorities more time to build a case for Yucca Mountain or appointing a Yucca advocate to the nuclear projects board could possibly be interpreted as being in line with the state’s opposition to the plan."[11] Sen. Harry Reid (D-NV) said "this amounts to surrendering in Nevada's decades-long fight against the project."[12] Rep. Shelley Berkley (D-NV) said “This demonstrates to me that he either doesn’t know what he’s doing or he’s reversed his position.”[13]

Mexican reimbursement

In August, 2007, Governor Gibbons attempted to obtain reimbursement for the health care of Mexican nationals from the Mexican government. He did not succeed.[14]

State budget

In October 2007, Gibbons proposed cutting funding for state services by 5% and ordered state agencies to submit lists of the services to be cut. Among the state agencies that were ordered to cut their budgets were the Nevada System of Higher Education, child welfare agencies and the juvenile justice agency.[15] Gibbons expected an $80 million dollar cut to come directly from the Health and Human services agency alone.[15] Most of these agencies refused to submit a revised budget to Governor Gibbons, citing already threadbare budgets.[15]

On November 21, 2007, Gibbons revised his proposal upward for cutting state budgets. Nevada agencies were then told to plan for 8% cuts.[16]

In 2008, Gibbons suggested that the Nevada legislature cut the state budget for elementary, secondary and higher education by 14%.[17][18][19][20][21] Jim Rogers, Nevada Chancellor for Education, said of the budget cuts, "We’re talking about something that is going to cripple us financially and competitively. The effects will be felt on our economy for the next 50 to 100 years."[22] The Nevada Policy Research Institute criticized the Governor's office for the budget, when the administration claimed that the state was facing a crisis, despite a 1 percent decrease in state spending.[23]

On June 1st, 2009 Governor Gibbons veto of allowing domestic partnerships was overridden by the state Assembly. Nevada will extend most of the rights given to married couples including those of the same sex.[24]

Criticism and controversy while Congressman

Plagiarism

A speech given in February 2005 by Rep. Gibbons in Elko, Nevada was actually plagiarized from a copyrighted speech delivered in 2003 by then-Alabama State Auditor Beth Chapman at a "Stand up America" rally.[25]

Allegations of favoring mining industry donors

In November 2005, Gibbons and Representative Richard Pombo (R-CA) co-authored an amendment to the Federal Budget Reconciliation Bill easing restrictions of sale of federal lands to mining companies. This amendment attracted fire from environmentalists, anti-growth advocates, and even some Republican Senators[26] concerned about the measure's effects on hunting and fishing. The bill (and amendment) narrowly passed the House, but the stated opposition of many Democratic Senators and the concerns voiced by Republican Senators make the amendment's future uncertain.

Federal bribery investigation

On November 1, 2006, the Wall Street Journal published a story stating that Gibbons had earmarked several millions of dollars to a company owned by Warren Trepp, as well as added additional funds to a pre-existing government contract with Trepp's company. The report noted that Trepp had paid for a $10,000 cruise for Gibbons and his wife, which Gibbons failed to report, and $100,000 in campaign contributions. A former Trepp business partner claimed that Gibbons was also given gambling chips – convertible into cash – and cash directly.[27][28][29]

On February 15, 2007, the Journal reported that Gibbons was under federal investigation for allegedly accepting unreported gifts and/or payments from Trepp in exchange for official acts while he served in Congress (1997–2007).[30][31][32]

According to reports, on March 22, 2005, days before Trepp and his wife left for the Caribbean cruise with Gibbons and his family, Jalé Trepp, Warren’s wife, sent a reminder to her husband. It said, “Please don't forget to bring the money you promised Jim and Dawn (Gibbons).” Minutes later, Trepp responded, “Don't you ever send this kind of message to me! Erase this message from your computer right now!”[33][34][35]

The U.S. Attorney for Nevada at time of the investigation was Daniel Bogden, who was one of seven federal prosecutors forced out of his job by the Bush administration in December 2006.[36][37][38]

Criticism and controversy while Governor

Undocumented housekeeper/nanny

As Gibbons was campaigning for governor in October 2006, it was brought to light that more than ten years earlier, he and his wife Dawn had employed Patricia Pastor Sandoval, a then-illegal immigrant from Peru, as a housekeeper and babysitter. Since the Zoe Baird "Nannygate" scandal of 1993, politicians have been deeply concerned about the impact of such revelations on their careers.

Dawn, who had become a Nevada state representative in 1998, denied the allegations in 2006, claiming that Sandoval had merely been a friend who had helped out around the house and was given clothing and household goods, but was not an employee. An employment contract from between Dawn Gibbons and Sandoval, however, appeared to disprove that assertion, as it clearly laid out the terms and conditions of Sandoval's hiring. Documents filed during Sandoval's 1988 application for working papers also contradicted earlier statements by Dawn Gibbons that the family had not known that the woman was in the United States illegally.[39]

Sandoval stated that she was employed from roughly 1987 to 1993, four years before Gibbons left for Washington in 1997 after his 1996 election as a Congressman and five years before Dawn Gibbons became a state legislator. Sandoval also stated that she was asked to hide in the basement and refrain from answering doors at certain times in order to ensure that her illegal status did not become public knowledge and jeopardize Gibbons' political career.

In 1995, Dawn Gibbons filed a police complaint against Sandoval, alleging that she was attempting to extort money by threatening to go to the media with a story involving her illegal employment. Jim and Dawn Gibbons did not pursue the matter further.[40]

In response to the 2006 revelations, Jim Gibbons' campaign issued a statement accusing Democratic candidate Dina Titus of fomenting the controversy to distract from the real issues of the race, but did not issue a denial of Sandoval's claims.[41]

Sexual assault allegation

In October 2006, near the conclusion of his successful campaign for governor, a woman accused Jim Gibbons of attempted sexual assault in a parking garage. Gibbons claimed he was helping her to her car. They both admitted to drinking alcohol at McCormick and Schmick's restaurant in Las Vegas.

In the initial aftermath of the event, Las Vegas Sheriff Bill Young, a long time supporter of Jim Gibbons and donor to his gubernatorial campaign, cited lack of evidence in the case and refused to bring evidence of the attack to the District Attorney. The accuser did not initially want to pursue pressing charges, saying she just wanted "to be left alone." But when the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department was forced to open the incident case file after inquiries by Las Vegas media, the Las Vegas Review Journal and the Las Vegas Sun released her name and she was thrust into the public eye. She later said she was being pressured to not talk to the police about the incident by people close to Jim Gibbons.[42] In fact, the Gibbons campaign hired a private investigator to "talk" to the woman shortly after the incident occurred.[43]

Under pressure from the media and eventually from the accuser herself, Sheriff Bill Young famously taunted the alleged victim to "bring it on" and sign a formal complaint. This was a highly irregular step, as most victims of assault are not required to sign a complaint before an investigation can begin. Nevertheless, she signed the complaint and there was a further investigation. The evidence was given to the Las Vegas District Attorney, David Roger, who had also donated to the Gibbons campaign. Criminal charges were never filed in the case.[44]

Gibbons' gubernatorial campaign manager, Robert Uithoven, speculated in an e-mail to Gibbons' supporters that Dina Titus, Gibbons' opponent, hired the woman to entice Gibbons. Titus retorted that to do this she would have had to control where Gibbons went, who he was with, and even the weather (Gibbons claimed he was helping the woman to her car in part because of the weather).[45]

By 2009, the alleged victim had filed a civil suit against Jim Gibbons, specifically alleging battery, false imprisonment and second-degree kidnapping as well as deceit about the episode.[5]

Undeclared donations

Gibbons set up a legal defense fund just before the November, 2006 gubernatorial election to help pay for legal expenses incurred after a woman accused him of attempted sexual assault. Gibbons neither reported the legal defense fund to the appropriate U.S. House of Representatives committee (even though he was a sitting congressman at the time and was required by House rules to do so), nor did he report donations to his legal defense fund as contributions to his gubernatorial campaign, citing the money was for "personal use" and not for "political purposes."[46]

In January 2008, it was reported that Gibbons raised $256,000 for his legal defense fund during 2007, including a $61,000 personal loan Gibbons gave to his own fund, as well as $10,000 from The Palms hotel and casino, and $40,000 from various companies connected to Las Vegas Sands Corporation Chief Executive Sheldon Adelson.[47] The defense fund has spent money to defend Gibbons in cases which include:

  • Investigations into the allegations that Gibbons secured defense contracts for his friend Warren Trepp in exchange for gifts and money during his time in Congress, 1997-2006.
  • A nepotism scandal regarding Sierra Nevada Corporation's hire of Nevada first lady Dawn Gibbons as a consultant. Sierra Nevada paid Dawn Gibbons $35,000 at the same time Jim Gibbons helped the company get a no-bid federal contract.
  • Gibbons' alleged attempted sexual assault of a Las Vegas woman in 2006
  • Questions about Gibbons' employment of an illegal immigrant as a nanny[48]

Interference with an ongoing investigation

On August 3, 2007, the Las Vegas Review Journal printed the following:

A newly available document states that Gov. Jim Gibbons "has admitted" that he urged federal authorities to pursue criminal action against a software developer whose business dispute with a friend of Gibbons has prompted a federal investigation. The statement is made in a legal motion filed last year, but kept secret until Tuesday, when it was unsealed at a judge's order.[49]

Lamoille Land Deal

In 2007, Governor Gibbons and wife Dawn purchased 40 acres of land in the ranch county of Lamoille, which belonged to Nevada Judge Jerry Carr Whitehead. The Elko County Assessor said he felt pressure from the governor and the governor's lawyer to lower the tax liability. Under state law, such an agricultural tax break goes only to legitimate farm and ranch operations, and must generate at least $5,000 a year in income. If such a land is developed by million-dollar homes, property taxes would go up. "To say I was put in an awkward position I think is an understatement," Joe Aguirre, a Republican, told The Associated Press in 2008.[50] The editorial page of the Las Vegas Review-Journal said the deal might constitute fraud.[51]

Dedication to office

While the state faces an economic slowdown and steep budget cuts, Gibbons is facing criticism from officials for spending less time at his office. The Las Vegas Sun reviewed Gibbons’ attendance and discovered that he was only in his Capitol office five days in August 2008 and never for a full eight hours. In September, he was in his office a total of seven days.

In an interview with Las Vegas Sun reporters, Gibbons said “I never knew this job had a time frame on it that requires me to be sitting behind a desk at a certain hour.” He also said that he works about 60 hours a week for the state. Previous Nevada governors were also interviewed and they said that they felt it was necessary that they spent most of their time in the office.[52]

Gibbons' dedication to his office was called into question again six months later. On April 2, 2009, while appearing before a legislative panel to promote his renewable energy bill, Gibbons pulled out his cellphone and began texting. News stories used this incident to revisit the 860 messages he sent to his alleged paramour, and a 37-second video of him halting the hearing as he was introducing himself to the panel in order to send the text message was posted on YouTube.[53]

Popularity

As of June 2008, Gibbons had a 21% approval and 74% disapproval rating.

Polling conducted in June of 2009 indicated an all-time low 10% approval rating, with 59% disappproving.[54]

Beliefs and ideologies

Civil liberties

  • Voted YES on Constitutionally defining marriage as one-man-one-woman. (Jul 2006)
  • Voted YES on constitutional amendment prohibiting flag desecration. (Jun 2003)
  • Rated 7% by the ACLU, indicating what the group considers an "anti-civil liberties" voting record. (Dec 2002)
  • Voted YES on making the PATRIOT Act permanent. (Dec 2005)[55]

Education

As governor

In January 2007, Governor Gibbons asked Nevada lawmakers to approve his budget that cut the percentage of education funding in Nevada to increase the percentage for public safety and human services programs.[56]

In 2008, Gibbons suggested that the Nevada legislature cut the state general fund budget for elementary, secondary and higher education by 14% (this does not include federal or local revenues, or funds for construction or teacher penions).[17][57][58][59][60] Jim Rogers, Nevada Chancellor for Education, said of the budget cuts, "We’re talking about something that is going to cripple us financially and competitively. The effects will be felt on our economy for the next 50 to 100 years."[61]

As congressman

  • Rated 10% by the NEA, indicating what the group considers "anti-public education spending" votes.[62]
  • Voted YES on allowing prayer in public schools during the War on Terror.[62]
  • Voted YES on letting public schools display the words "God Bless America."[62]
  • Supports a Constitutional Amendment for prayer in public schools.[62]
  • Gibbons supports "No Child Left Behind."[63]

Taxes

As governor

Jim Gibbons pledged during his 1996 campaign for governor to not impose new taxes on businesses or individuals in Nevada.[64] Some businesses asked for tax increases to pay for new roads in Nevada, but Gibbons did not acquiesce.[65]

As congressman

  • Voted YES on replacing illegal export tax breaks with $140B in new breaks. (Jun 2004)
  • Voted YES on Bankruptcy Overhaul requiring partial debt repayment. (Mar 2001)[66]
  • Voted YES on Tax cut package of $958 B over 10 years. (May 2001)
  • Voted YES on eliminating the Estate Tax ("death tax"). (Apr 2001)
  • Voted YES on eliminating the "marriage penalty". (Jul 2000)
  • Rated 67% by NTU, indicating "Satisfactory" on tax votes. (Dec 2003)

Quotations

  • "Tree-hugging, Birkenstock-wearing, hippie, tie-dyed liberals… go make their movies and their music and whine somewhere else…. It's just too damn bad we didn't buy them a ticket [to become human shields in Iraq]."[67]
  • "Anybody who is against that [corporate-funded inaugural bashes] obviously must be a communist."[68]
  • "Look at the movie Wag the Dog, I think [President Clinton's military actions on the day of scheduled impeachment hearings] has all the elements of that movie. Our reaction to the embassy bombings should be based on sound, credible evidence, not a knee-jerk reaction to try to direct public attention away from his (Bill Clinton's) personal problems."[69]
  • "... I learned an important lesson, never to offer a helping hand to anybody ever again", following the alleged assault on the woman in the parking lot in October 2006.[70]
  • "I would have loved to have been the committee chairman and when the choice was made to go with Pete Hoekstra (R-Mich.), of course that disappointed me...but as my mother would say, when one door closes, another opens up",[71] regarding Gibbons' non-selection for chair of the House Intelligence Committee, and the possibility that he could instead run for Governor.

Electoral history

Nevada Gubernatorial Election 2006
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Jim Gibbons 278,998 47.9
Democratic Dina Titus 255,684 43.9

References

  1. ^ Inaccuracy Fixed: Gibbons Mystified by Inaccurate Listing – Las Vegas Review Journal 5/19/06
  2. ^ The Las Vegas Review Journal
  3. ^ USA Today
  4. ^ Riley, Brendan (May 2, 2008). "Nevada governor files for divorce". The Orange County Register (Associated Press). http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/N/NV_GOVERNORS_DIVORCE_CAOL-?SITE=CAANR&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT. Retrieved on 2008-05-03. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g Divorce filings accuse Nevada governor of affairs, April 7, 2009, Associated Press report by Sandra Chereb and Scott Sonner.
  6. ^ news.yahoo.com Paper: Nev. gov. sent 860 texts to woman in month
  7. ^ Nevada Appeal
  8. ^ a b Ely News
  9. ^ Nevada Appeal
  10. ^ State of Nevada Press Release
  11. ^ Las Vegas Sun
  12. ^ Las Vegas Review Journal
  13. ^ Las Vegas Sun
  14. ^ The Las Vegas Sun
  15. ^ a b c "Rogers, county officials defy Gibbons on budget cut lists", Las Vegas Review Journal.
  16. ^ { http://news.rgj.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20071120/NEWS18/71120032&oaso=news.rgj.com/breakingnews "Nev. govt. agencies told to plan for 8% cuts"] Associated Press
  17. ^ a b Next budget expected to be cut to the bone The Las Vegas Sun
  18. ^ As troubles mount, Gibbons disengages The Las Vegas Sun
  19. ^ Tension builds as Gibbons cloaks budget cuts in secrecy The Las Vegas Sun
  20. ^ Gibbons calls for more Nevada budget cuts The Las Vegas Sun
  21. ^ http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2007/apr/03/gibbons-tax-breaks-run-smack-into-reality/ The Las Vegas Sun
  22. ^ [http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2008/may/30/rogers-boils-over/ Rogers boils over: Chancellor says governor wounds education, won’t return his calls] The Las Vegas Sun
  23. ^ "Handicapping the Debate" Nevada Policy Research Institute [1]
  24. ^ CNNPolitics http://edition.cnn.hu/2009/POLITICS/05/31/nevada.domestic.partnerships/index.html?iref=hpmostpop
  25. ^ The Las Vegas Review Journal
  26. ^ Gov Exec
  27. ^ TPM Muckraker
  28. ^ NY Times
  29. ^ Las Vegas Review Journal
  30. ^ TPM Muckraker
  31. ^ NY Times
  32. ^ Las Vegas Review Journal
  33. ^ TPM Muckraker
  34. ^ NY Times
  35. ^ Las Vegas Review Journal
  36. ^ TPM Muckraker
  37. ^ NY Times
  38. ^ Las Vegas Review Journal
  39. ^ KLAS
  40. ^ KLAS
  41. ^ KLAS
  42. ^ The Las Vegas Review Journal
  43. ^ The Las Vegas Review Journal
  44. ^ The Las Vegas Review Journal
  45. ^ Reporter Steve Sebelius, October 23, 2006.
  46. ^ The Las Vegas Review Journal
  47. ^ Gibbons' '07 legal defense funds: $256,000 - Money includes $61,000 personal loan from governor, Las Vegas Review Journal.
  48. ^ Gibbons' '07 legal defense funds: $256,000 - Money includes $61,000 personal loan from governor, January 18, 2008, Las Vegas Review-Journal.
  49. ^ News Bank
  50. ^ A.P. News
  51. ^ Editorial: Governor's Land Deal, July 22, 2008, Las Vegas Review-Journal.
  52. ^ Where does Gibbons work? Apparently not at his desk, Las Vegas Sun.
  53. ^ Gibbons gets more news time with texting video, April 5, 2009, Reno Gazette Journal.
  54. ^ Vogel, Ed (2008-06-13). "GOVERNING NEVADA: Disregard divorce, poll says". Las Vegas Review Journal. http://www.lvrj.com/news/19883914.html. Retrieved on 2009-01-01. 
  55. ^ On the Issues
  56. ^ KLAS
  57. ^ As troubles mount, Gibbons disengages The Las Vegas Sun
  58. ^ Tension builds as Gibbons cloaks budget cuts in secrecy The Las Vegas Sun
  59. ^ Gibbons calls for more Nevada budget cuts The Las Vegas Sun
  60. ^ Gibbons tax breaks run smack into reality The Las Vegas Sun
  61. ^ Rogers boils over: Chancellor says governor wounds education, won’t return his calls The Las Vegas Sun
  62. ^ a b c d On the Issues
  63. ^ New York times
  64. ^ Nevada Appeal
  65. ^ Nevada Appeal
  66. ^ On the Issues
  67. ^ Demanding an Apology – Fox News 3/4/05
  68. ^ Corporate cash backs Bush inaugural bash – MSNBC, 1/19/05
  69. ^ Did Jim Gibbons Aid Al Qaida? – votegibbonsout.blog.com 3/31/04
  70. ^ MSNBC
  71. ^ Gibbons Mulls Bid For Governor – Reno Gazette Journal, 1/13/05

External links

Template:Start box |- ! colspan="3" style="background: #cccccc" | United States House of Representatives |- style="text-align:center;" |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"|Preceded by
Barbara Vucanovich |width="40%" style="text-align: center;" rowspan="1"|Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Nevada's 2nd congressional district

January 3, 1997December 31, 2006 |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"| Succeeded by
Dean Heller |- |- ! colspan="3" style="background: #ccccff;" | Political offices

|- style="text-align:center;" |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"|Preceded by
Kenny Guinn |width="40%" style="text-align: center;" rowspan="1"|Governor of Nevada
2007 – present |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"|Incumbent |- Template:End box

Template:Current U.S. governors


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

James Arthur "Jim" Gibbons (born December 16, 1944) is the 28th Governor of the U.S. state of Nevada. A Republican, he is a former member of the United States House of Representatives from 1997 to 2006.

Quotes

  • Tree-hugging, Birkenstock-wearing, hippie, tie-dyed liberals [in Hollywood should]… go make their movies and their music and whine somewhere else…. It's just too damn bad we didn't buy them a ticket [to become human shields in Iraq]."
    • Fox News, March 04, 2005, [1]
  • Anybody who is against that obviously must be a communist.
    • On corporate-funded celebrations; MSNBC, Jan 19, 2005 [2]
  • Look at the movie 'Wag the Dog, I think this has all the elements of that movie. Our reaction to the embassy bombings should be based on sound, credible evidence, not a knee-jerk reaction to try to direct public attention away from his personal problems.
    • On the Monica Lewinsky Scandal; Tokoma Tribune, 1998.[3]; Gibbons thought Clinton was too aggressive in taking on the terrorist threat posed by Al Qaida.
  • One volcano in Hawaii, one volcano in Indonesia, produces enough gases in the atmosphere, which include those natural elements that are in the Earth's crust, that, uh, kind of make all the, you know, the science that we have about what we produce, moot.

External links

All wikimedia projects
Articles on this topic in other Wikimedia projects can be found at: Wikimedia Commons Jim Gibbons (United States politician)

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