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John Cromwell Mather

Born August 7, 1946 (1946-08-07) (age 63)
Roanoke, Virginia, USA
Residence United States
Nationality United States
Fields Astrophysics, cosmology
Institutions NASA
Alma mater Swarthmore College
University of California, Berkeley
Known for Cosmic microwave background radiation
Notable awards Nobel Prize in Physics (2006)
For other persons with a similar name, see John Mather.

John Cromwell Mather (b. August 7, 1946, Roanoke, Virginia) is an American astrophysicist, cosmologist and Nobel Prize in Physics laureate for his work on COBE with George Smoot. COBE was the first experiment to measure "... the black body form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation."

This work helped cement the big-bang theory of the universe using the Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE). According to the Nobel Prize committee, "the COBE-project can also be regarded as the starting point for cosmology as a precision science."[1]

Mather is a senior astrophysicist at the U.S. space agency's (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland and adjunct professor of physics at the University of Maryland, College Park. In 2007, Mather was listed among Time magazine's 100 Most Influential People in The World.

Mather is also the project scientist for the James Webb Space Telescope, a space telescope to be launched to L2 no earlier than 2013.

Contents

Biography

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Education and initial research

Honors and awards

See also

References

  1. ^ The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (3 October 2006). "The Nobel Prize in Physics 2006" (.PDF). Press release. http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/2006/info.html. Retrieved 2006-10-05.  
  2. ^ John C. Mather autobiography, Nobel Prize. Accessed June 29, 2008. "When I finished 8th grade, it was time to go to high school, and my parents decided to send me to Newton High School, where they thought we would get the best available education in our area."

External links


Simple English

John C. Mather
BornAugust 7, 1946 (1946-08-07) (age 64)
Roanoke, Virginia, USA
ResidenceUnited States
NationalityAmerican
FieldAstrophysics, cosmology
InstitutionsNASA
Alma materSwarthmore College
University of California, Berkeley
Known forCosmic microwave background radiation
Notable prizesFile:Nobel prize Nobel Prize in Physics (2006)

Professor John Cromwell Mather Virginia is an American astrophysicist and cosmologist who was born on August 7, 1946, Roanoke. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2006 for his work on COBE satellite with George Smoot. The COBE satellite measures black holes and cosmic radiation.

This work supported the big-bang theory of the universe beginning and made cosmology much more accurate. The Nobel Prize committee said: "the COBE-project can also be regarded as the starting point for cosmology as a precision science."[1]

Mather is a Senior Astrophysicist at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland and he is a professor of physics at the University of Maryland, College Park. In 2007, Mather was listed in Time magazine's 100 Most Influential People in The World.

Contents

Education and early work

File:COBE cmb fluctuations.gif
Picture of cosmic radiation taken by COBE

Work with COBE

After being awarded his Ph.D. Professor Mather went to work at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies at Columbia University, he started the work on COBE (1974-1976). More than 1,000 researchers, engineers and other workers made the COBE satellite. John Mather was in control of them all and created the technology for measuring the cosmic radiation. George Smoot had the job of measuring small changes in the temperature of the radiation.[1]

Professor Mather and John Boslough wrote all about the COBE teams work in a book called The Very First Light.[2]

Awards

  • 1964-68 Swarthmore College Open Scholarship (honorary)
  • 1967 William Lowell Putnam Mathematical Competition, 30th place nationwide
  • 1968-70 NSF Fellowship and honorary Woodrow Wilson Fellowship
  • 1970-74 Fellow, Hertz Foundation
  • 1974-76 Postdoctoral Fellow, NRC
  • 1990 NASA GSFC John C. Lindsay Memorial Award
  • 1991 Rotary National Space Achievement Award
  • 1991 National Air and Space Museum Trophy
  • 1992 Aviation Week and Space Technology Laurels for Space/Missiles
  • 1993 Discover Magazine Technology Award finalist
  • 1993 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Space Science Award
  • 1993 American Astronomical Society and American Institute of Physics Dannie Heineman Prize for Astrophysics
  • 1994 Fellow, Goddard Space Flight Center
  • 1994 Doctor of Science, honoris causa, Swarthmore College
  • 1995 City of Philadelphia John Scott Award
  • 1996 American Academy of Arts and Sciences Rumford Prize
  • 1996 Fellow, American Physical Society
  • 1997 Aviation Week and Space Technology Hall of Fame
  • 1997 Member, National Academy of Sciences
  • 1998 Marc Aaronson Memorial Prize
  • 1998 Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences
  • 1999 Franklin Institute Benjamin Franklin Medal in Physics
  • 2005 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers George W. Goddard Award
  • 2006 Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation Prize in Cosmology
  • 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics
  • 2007 Fellow, SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering

Other pages

  • James Webb Space Telescope

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (3 October 2006). "The Nobel Prize in Physics 2006" (.PDF). Press release. Retrieved on 5 October 2006.
  2. Mather, John; Boslough, John (1997). The Very First Light: The True Inside Story of the Scientific Journey Back to the Dawn of the Universe. New York: Basic Books. ISBN 0465015751. 

Other websites


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