The Full Wiki

More info on John Charles Wright

John Charles Wright: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Did you know ...


More interesting facts on John Charles Wright

Include this on your site/blog:

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

John Charles Wright, (19 August 1861 – 24 February 1933) was an Anglican Archbishop of Sydney, Australia, responsible for significantly reducing the influence of Anglo-Catholicism in the diocese.

Wright was born in Bolton, England, the son of the Reverend Joseph Farrall Wright (1827-1883), Vicar of Christ Church, Bolton and co-founder of Bolton Wanderers football club. He was educated at Manchester Grammar School and Merton College, Oxford, where he graduated with honours in 1884. He was ordained deacon in 1885 and priest in 1886. After serving as a curate for eight years he became vicar of Ulverston in 1893. Two years later he transferred to St George's at Leeds, an important industrial parish, for nine years. In 1904 he was made a canon of Manchester cathedral, rector of St George's, Holme, and chaplain to the Bishop of Manchester. Early in 1909 he was appointed Archdeacon of Manchester.[1][2]

Later in 1909 he accepted the archbishopric of Sydney and was consecrated at St Paul's Cathedral, London, on 24 August 1909. He was also metropolitan of New South Wales and in April 1910 was elected primate of Australia, the first occasion on which an election was held for this office. He was Ramsden preacher at Cambridge in 1913, and during the war of 1914-18 took great interest in work among the soldiers. The spread of Anglo-Catholic doctrines in Australia gave him much anxiety as he was strongly Evangelical. About the year 1924 he had a serious illness and was henceforth compelled to go carefully. He was, however, an excellent chairman of synod during the long years of debate of the new constitution for the Church of England in Australia. He felt strongly that the diocese should adhere consistently to the Evangelical doctrines of the Church of England and eventually general synod agreed that they should be embodied in the new constitution. Early in 1933 Wright took ill while visiting a daughter in New Zealand and died at Christchurch, following an operation, on 24 February 1933. In 1903 he married Dorothy Margaret Isabella Fiennes, daughter of Colonel the Honourable Ivo de Vesci, who survived him with a son and three daughters. He was the author of Thoughts on Modern Church Life and Work, published in 1909.[1][2]

It was Wright who banned the chasuble from use in churches in Sydney.[2]

References

This article incorporates text from the 1949 edition of Dictionary of Australian Biography from Project Gutenberg of Australia, which is in the public domain in Australia and the United States of America.

Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message