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John Coolidge circa 1924

John Coolidge (September 7, 1906 – May 31, 2000) was the elder of the two children of U.S. President Calvin Coolidge and Grace Coolidge.[1] In the summer of 1924, he was playing tennis with his brother, Calvin Jr., on the White House grounds when Calvin Jr. suffered a blister on his toe, which became infected, resulting in his death a week later. John described the loss of his brother as producing a depression in President Coolidge that lasted the rest of his life.

Coolidge attended to Mercersburg Academy in Mercersburg, Pennsylvania and graduated in 1924. He then enrolled at Amherst College, his father's alma mater, graduating in 1928.

In 1929 he married Florence Trumbull (died 1998), daughter of Connecticut governor John H. Trumbull. The Coolidges had two daughters, Cynthia Coolidge Jeter (1933-1989) and Lydia Coolidge (1939-2001).

He was an executive with the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad. He served as president of the Connecticut Manifold Forms Company until 1960, when he reopened the Plymouth Cheese Corporation in Plymouth at the historic village. He helped start the Coolidge Foundation and his gifts of buildings, land, and artifacts were instrumental in creating the President Calvin Coolidge State Historic Site.

Well into his 80's, Coolidge was seen shuttling back and forth from his home near the Calvin Coolidge Historical Site to collect his mail at the old post office located on the historic site. He was reportedly a charming and excited talker who would still answer visitors' questions about his father or his family, and who would, on occasion, give a rare personal interview.

He was survived by a daughter, son-in-law, three grandchildren, and two great grandchildren.

References

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