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John Cradlebaugh


In office
December 2, 1861 – March 3, 1863
Preceded by (none)
Succeeded by Gordon Newell Mott

Born February 22, 1819(1819-02-22)
Circleville, Ohio
Died February 22, 1872 (aged 53)
Eureka, Nevada
Political party Independent
Profession Attorney, mining

John Cradlebaugh (February 22, 1819 – February 22, 1872) was the first delegate to the United States House of Representatives from Nevada Territory.

Contents

Biography

Born in Circleville, Ohio, he attended the common schools; Kenyon College (in Gambier, Ohio) and Miami University (in Ohio). He studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1840, and was appointed United States associate justice for the district of Utah on June 4, 1858.

In March 1859, Cradlebaugh convened a grand jury in Provo, Utah concerning the Mountain Meadows massacre and several other unsolved murders and crimes that occurred in the territory, but the jury declined any indictments.[1][2] In doing this Cradlebaugh called out the federal troops and terrorized the local residents. His high handed actions on this occasion were condemned by both Utah Governor Alfred Cumming and United States Attorney General Jeremiah S. Black.[3]

Cradlebaugh moved to Carson City, Nevada, and upon the formation of the Territory of Nevada was elected a Delegate to the Thirty-seventh Congress, serving from December 2, 1861, to March 3, 1863, during the first years of the American Civil War.[4]

He was the colonel of the 114th Ohio Infantry and served from April 27, 1862, until honorably discharged on October 20, 1863, on tender of resignation after being wounded in the Battle of Vicksburg.

Cadelebaugh returned to Nevada and engaged in the mining business until his death at Eureka; interment was in Forest Cemetery, Circleville, Ohio.

Notes

  1. ^ Cradlebaugh, John (March 15, 1859), Anderson, Kirk, ed., "Charge", Valley Tan 1 (20): 1, http://udn.lib.utah.edu/u?/valleytan,553  
  2. ^ Cradlebaugh, John (March 29, 1859), Anderson, Kirk, ed., "Discharge of the Grand Jury", Valley Tan 1 (22): 3, http://udn.lib.utah.edu/u?/valleytan,632  
  3. ^ FARMS Review Vol. 15, Issue 2, p. 221]
  4. ^ Cradlebaugh, John (February 7, 1863), Utah and the Mormons: a Speech on the Admission of Utah as a State, 37th United States Congress, 3rd Session, http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=llcg&fileName=063/llcg063.db&recNum=798  

See also

References

  1. Cradlebaugh, William (1917), WILLIAM M. CRADLEBAUGH—NEVADA BIOGRAPHY-1883, http://www.nevadaobserver.com/Reading%20Room%20Documents/Nevada%20Biography%20(1883).htm  
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
(none)
Delegate to the United States House of Representatives from Nevada Territory
1861–1863
Succeeded by
Gordon Newell Mott
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