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John E. Miller

John Elvis Miller (May 15, 1888 – January 30, 1981) was a Democratic Party politician from Arkansas who represented the state in the United States House of Representatives from 1931 until 1937, and in the United States Senate from 1937 until 1941.

Miller was born in Aid, Missouri on May 15, 1888, and began his education in public schools. He attended the public Southeast Missouri State Teachers College at Cape Girardeau, and Valparaiso University; in 1912 he graduated from the law department of the University of Kentucky at Lexington, in which year he was admitted to the bar began practicing in Searcy, Arkansas. During this time, he was also active in banking, while remaining interested in politics; he was a delegate to the state constitutional convention in 1918, and he served from 1919 to 1922 as a prosecuting attorney on the state's first judicial circuit. He was elected in 1930 to the United States House of Representatives, serving there until his resignation in 1937 to become a senator; he had been elected to the Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Joseph T. Robinson. Although the term ended in 1943, Miller resigned in 1941 to take up his appointment as a judge for the United States District Court for the Western District of Arkansas. He retired from his post in 1967 and became a senior district judge. Miller lived in Fort Smith, Arkansas until his death on January 30, 1981.

Further reading

United States Senate
Preceded by
Joseph T. Robinson
United States Senator (Class 2) from Arkansas
November 15, 1937 – March 31, 1941
Served alongside: Hattie Caraway
Succeeded by
G. Lloyd Spencer
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