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For the fictional character, see Trapper John McIntyre. For the Scottish radiologist, see John Macintyre.

John McIntire
Born June 27, 1907
Spokane, Washington, U.S.
Died January 30, 1991 (aged 83)
Pasadena, California, U.S.
Occupation Actor
Years active 1947–1989
Spouse(s) Jeanette Nolan (1935-1991)

John McIntire (June 27, 1907 – January 30, 1991) was an American character actor.

Contents

Biography

The craggy-faced film actor was born in Spokane in eastern Washington State but reared in Montana, growing up with ranchers and cowboys which would eventually inspire his performances in dozens of westerns later in life. The USC graduate began acting in radio and on stage.

McIntire began his long movie career at the age of forty in 1947, often playing roles as police chiefs, judges and sometimes crazy coots. His films include the film noir classic The Asphalt Jungle (1950) and his last film playing a crazy dog owner in Turner & Hooch (1989). He also played movie villains in westerns, some of which are considered the best films of the genre: Winchester '73 (1950), The Far Country (1955), both with James Stewart, and The Tin Star, with Henry Fonda (1957), in which he was not a villain but a country physician.

On television, he appeared in ABC's Naked City (TV series), but his character was killed off. In the summer of 1959, he co-starred with Joan Crawford in the episode "Silent Witness of NBC's anthology series, The Joseph Cotten Show.

McIntire played trailmaster Chris Hale on the NBC-ABC series, Wagon Train, having in 1961 replaced Ward Bond as Seth Adams, who died late in 1960. He subsequently replaced actor Lee J. Cobb and Charles Bickford on NBC's The Virginian in 1967. Prior to his Wagon Train role, he guest starred as William Palmer in the series finale, "The Most Dangerous Gentleman", of the short-lived 1960 NBC western Overland Trail, starring William Bendix and Doug McClure, his subsequent co-star on The Virginian.

McIntire married fellow actor Jeanette Nolan, in 1935, and they had two children together, one of whom was the actor Tim McIntire (1944-1986) who starred in the 1978 film American Hot Wax. He also played the brief but memorable role of Sheriff Al Chambers in Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho (1960), in which Nolan read some of Mother's lines and also did some voice-over screaming. McIntire worked more closely with Jeanette Nolan in Disney's 1977 The Rescuers, where he had voiced the cat Rufus and she, the muskrat Ellie Mae. Four years later, the couple worked on another Disney film, The Fox and the Hound, with McIntire as the voice of Mr. Digger, a badger, and Nolan as the voice of Widow Tweed.

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Death

John McIntire died from emphysema and lung cancer in Pasadena, California in 1991.

Partial filmography

External links


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