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Photograph of John Pack, 1860 (aprox)

John Pack (May 20, 1809 – April 4, 1885) was a member of the Council of Fifty and a missionary in the early days of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Contents

Biography

Pack was born in New Brunswick. He married his first wife, Julia Ives, in 1832 in Jefferson County, New York. In 1836, Pack was baptized a member of the Church of the Latter Day Saints.[1]

Pack moved to Kirtland, Ohio, then to Missouri, and then to Nauvoo, Illinois. He was a member of the Nauvoo Legion holding the rank of Captain.[2] Pack also served as a policeman in Nauvoo.[3]

Pack was in the first company of Mormon pioneers to cross the plains with Brigham Young. He held the ranks of captain of fifty in the company as well as colonel in its military organization.[4] At the time of Joseph Smith's death, Pack was serving as a missionary in New Jersey with Ezra T. Benson.[5]

The University of Deseret, the predecessor of the University of Utah, was begun in the home of John Pack.[6]

Pack served with John Taylor as one of the first Mormon missionaries in France beginning in 1849. Pack was in this mission until 1852, but he spent most of his time preaching in the Channel Islands.[7]

In 1860, Pack and his eldest son, Ward Eaton Pack, built the first sawmill in Kamas, Utah Territory.[8]

Descendants

Ward Eton Pack twice served as president of the Hawaiian Mission of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Ward Eton's dughter Grace married Charles A. Callis who was later a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles.

Another one of John Pack's sons, Frederick J. Pack was a prominent professor at the University of Utah.

Notes

  1. ^ Bitton, Davis. The Redoubtable John Pack: Pioneer, Proselyter, Patriarch. (John Pack Family Association, 1982) p. 7, 11
  2. ^ Bitton. The Redoutable John Pack. p. 31
  3. ^ Smith, Joseph. with Roberts, B. H. as editor. History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Salt Lake City, Utah: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1932-1951) Vol. 6, p. 149
  4. ^ Smith, Joseph Fielding. Essentials In Church History. (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Company, 1971) p. 360
  5. ^ Times and Seasons, Vol. 5, No. 8, p. 505
  6. ^ Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. (Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret News Press, 1941) p. 190
  7. ^ Bitton. Redoutable John Pack. p. 113-137
  8. ^ Bitton. Redoubtable John Pack. p. 171

External links

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