The Full Wiki

More info on John Phillips House

John Phillips House: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

John Phillips House
U.S. National Register of Historic Places
Location: 6565 Spring Valley Rd. NW
Salem, Oregon
Nearest city: Salem, Oregon
Built/Founded: 1853
Architectural style(s): Classical Revival[2]/Greek Revival
Governing body: Private
Added to NRHP: March 15, 1976
NRHP Reference#: 76001588[1]

John Phillips House is a historic 1853 vernacular Greek Revival[3] house in the Spring Valley area of Polk County, Oregon, United States. It was built for pioneer John Phillips,[3] who came to Oregon via the Oregon Trail in 1845.[4] He finished his journey to Oregon on the Meek Cutoff as part of Stephen Meek's "lost wagon train".[4][5]

John Phillips, born in 1814, was a native of Wiltshire England who came to the U.S. in 1834 and settled in Florida.[5][6] After living in New Orleans—where he met and married Elizabeth Hibbard in 1839—and St. Louis, he came to Oregon and bought the Turner donation land claim in Polk County for $100.[5][6] The locale was once known as Spring Valley Ranch.[5] John Phillips hired carpenter Samuel Coad to build a house for him there.[7]

Three-quarter view of house showing the Eola Hills rising behind it

Samuel Coad served during the Cayuse War in 1855, and helped construct buildings at Fort Hoskins, including one commissioned by then-Lieutenant Philip Sheridan, which still stands near the community of Pedee.[7][8][9] Also known as the Condron House, the Philip Sheridan House is the focus of an effort to return it to the Fort Hoskins site and restore it.[8] Samuel Coad married the daughter of General Cornelius Gilliam, Henrietta, in 1853.[7] Coad also constructed the woolen mill at Ellendale.[7]

As of 1980, the John Phillips House was the oldest residence in Polk County and was still in the Phillips family.[5] The one-and-a-half story house has horizontal wood siding.[10]

The house has a Salem mailing address, but the closest settlement is the unincorporated community of Zena about a mile to the southwest.[5] John Phillips is buried in the Zena Cemetery at Spring Valley Presbyterian Church.[5]

References

  1. ^ "Oregon National Register List". Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. January 5, 2009. http://www.oregon.gov/OPRD/HCD/NATREG/docs/oregon_nr_list.pdf. Retrieved April 2, 2009.  
  2. ^ "National Register of Historic Places: Oregon—Polk County". nationalregisterofhistoricplaces.com (mirror site of official NRHP NRIS database: www.nr.nps.gov). http://www.nationalregisterofhistoricplaces.com/OR/Polk/state.html. Retrieved April 2, 2009.  
  3. ^ a b "ArchitectDB structure record: Phillips, John, House, Salem, OR". University of Washington Digital Library. http://digital.lib.washington.edu/architect/structures/9750/. Retrieved April 1, 2009.  
  4. ^ a b "Emigrants to Oregon In 1845". oregonpioneers.com. http://www.oregonpioneers.com/1845.htm. Retrieved April 2, 2009.  
  5. ^ a b c d e f g Wirfs, Charlotte L. (1980). "Tour No. 1: Early Settlements of N.E. Polk County". Historically Speaking (Polk County Historical Society) IV: 2.  
  6. ^ a b "John Phillips". The History of the Willamette Valley, Being A Description of the Valley and its Resources, with an account of its Discovery and Settlement by White Men, and its Subsequent History; Together with Personal Reminiscences of its Early Pioneers. Chapman Publishing Company. 1903. p. 644. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~jtenlen/ORBios/jphillips.txt. Retrieved April 2, 2009.  
  7. ^ a b c d "Samuel Coad". The History of the Willamette Valley, Being A Description of the Valley and its Resources, with an account of its Discovery and Settlement by White Men, and its Subsequent History; Together with Personal Reminiscences of its Early Pioneers. Chapman Publishing Company. 1903. p. 520. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~jtenlen/ORBios/scoad2.txt. Retrieved April 2, 2009.  
  8. ^ a b Maxwell, Ben (May 1, 1959). "Group Seeks Hoskins House". Capital Journal. forthoskins.com. http://www.forthoskins.com/Phil_Sheridan_House.htm. Retrieved April 2, 2009.  
  9. ^ Hines, H. K. (1893). An Illustrated History of the State of Oregon. Chicago: Lewis Publishing Company. p. 677. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~jtenlen/ORBios/scoad.txt. Retrieved April 2, 2009.  
  10. ^ "John Phillips House listing in the Oregon Historic Sites Database". Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. http://heritagedata.prd.state.or.us/historic/index.cfm?do=v.dsp_siteSummary&resultDisplay=47273. Retrieved April 2, 2009.  

External links

Coordinates: 45°01′40″N 123°07′33″W / 45.027686°N 123.125925°W / 45.027686; -123.125925

Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message