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John W. Taylor (politician): Wikis

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John W. Taylor


In office
November 15, 1820 – March 4, 1821
December 5, 1825 – March 4, 1827
President James Monroe
John Quincy Adams
Preceded by Henry Clay (twice)
Succeeded by Philip P. Barbour
Andrew Stevenson

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 11th district
In office
March 4, 1813 – March 3, 1823
Preceded by Thomas R. Gold
Succeeded by Charles A. Foote

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 17th district
In office
March 4, 1823 – March 3, 1833
Preceded by Thomas H. Hubbard
Succeeded by Joel Turrill

Born March 26, 1784
Charlton, New York
Died September 18, 1854 (aged 70)
Cleveland, Ohio
Political party Democratic-Republican
National Republican
Alma mater Union College
Profession Law

John W. Taylor (March 26, 1784 – September 18, 1854) was an early 19th century U.S. politician from New York. He was born in Charlton, New York and received his first education at home.

Taylor graduated from Union College with honors and served in the N.Y. legislature before being elected to Congress at age 28.

John Taylor served in the United States House of Representatives for 20 years, from 1813 to 1833, and served twice as Speaker of the House. He also was a representative of New York in the Missouri Compromise, where he took a stance against the extension of slavery along with people such as John Quincy Adams.

After leaving politics, Taylor practised law in Ballston Spa, New York and was elected to the N.Y. senate. He moved to Cleveland, Ohio after suffering a paralytic stroke in 1843, and died in that city 11 years later. He was buried in Ballston Spa where he had practiced law.

External links

Political offices
Preceded by
Henry Clay
Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives
November 15, 1820 – March 4, 1821
Succeeded by
Philip P. Barbour
Preceded by
Henry Clay
Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives
December 5, 1825 – March 4, 1827
Succeeded by
Andrew Stevenson
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
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Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York

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Succeeded by
[[]]
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