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Joseph Haslag is the Kenneth Lay Chair in Economics for the Department of Economics at University of Missouri in Columbia, Missouri. In addition, he is the executive vice president of the Show-Me Institute, a free market research institute based in St. Louis, Missouri. He also is executive director of the Economic & Policy Analysis Research Center in Missouri, which prepares forecasts and analyses used by the Missouri General Assembly and administrative units of state government. He holds a bachelor's degree from the University of Missouri, and a Ph.D. in economics from Southern Methodist University.

Haslag has taught at Southern Methodist University, Erasmus University Rotterdam, and Michigan State University. He has published his research in the Journal of Monetary Economics, the Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, and the International Economic Review. His research has been cited in more than 100 academic papers. Recent journal articles include: “On the determinants of optimal border enforcement,” published in 2008 in Economic Theory, and “Who is Afraid of the Freidman rule?” published in 2008 by Economic Inquiry.

He also has written numerous articles for the Show-Me Institute that have been published in newspapers throughout Missouri. The list includes an opinion piece, “Raising taxes isn’t answer to fiscal difficulties,” that appeared January 1, 2009, in the Springfield News-Leader, which argued that a sales tax was less volatile than an income tax. His most recent policy paper for the Show-Me Institute, “Unleashing Video Competition: The Benefits of Cable Franchise Reform for Missouri Consumers,” was published Feb. 28, 2007.

In a recent Vox magazine interview, Haslag said he was drawn to economics because he was puzzled by it.

He grew up in Springfield, Missouri.

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