Journal: Wikis

  
  
  

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Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A journal (through French from Latin diurnalis, daily) has several related meanings:

  • a daily record of events or business; a private journal is usually referred to as a diary.
  • a newspaper or other periodical, in the literal sense of one published each day;
  • many publications issued at stated intervals, such as magazines, or scholarly academic journals, or the record of the transactions of a society, are often called journals. Although journal is sometimes used, erroneously[citation needed], as a synonym for "magazine", in academic use, a journal refers to a serious, scholarly publication, most often peer-reviewed. A non-scholarly magazine written for an educated audience about an industry or an area of professional activity is usually[citation needed] called a professional magazine.

The word "journalist" for one whose business is writing for the public press has been in use since the end of the 17th century.

Contents

Open access

Open access journals are scholarly journals that are available to the reader without financial or other barrier other than access to the internet itself. Some are subsidized, and some require payment on behalf of the author. Subsidized journals are financed by an academic institution or a government information center.

Public journal

A public journal is a record of day-by-day events in a Parliament or Congress. It is also called minutes or records.

Business

The term "journal" is also used in business: Journal is the book in which the transactions are entered the first time they are processed.

  • a book in which an account of transactions is kept prior to a transfer to the ledger in the process of bookkeeping; or
  • an equivalent to a ship's log, as a record of the daily run, such as observations, weather changes, or other events of daily importance.

See also


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

JOURNAL (through Fr. from late Lat. diurnalis, daily), a daily record of events or business. A private journal is usually an elaborated diary. When applied to a newspaper or other periodical the word is strictly used of one published each day; but any publication issued at stated intervals, such as a magazine or the record of the transactions of a learned society, is commonly called a journal. The word "journalist" for one whose business is writing for the public press (see Newspapers) seems to be as old as the end of the 17th century.

"Journal" is particularly applied to the record, day by day, of the business and proceedings of a public body. The journals of the British houses of parliament contain an official record of the business transacted day by day in either house. The record does not take note of speeches, though some of the earlier volumes contain references to them. The journals are a lengthened account written from the "votes and proceedings" (in the House of Lords called "minutes of the proceedings"), made day by day by the assistant clerks, and printed on the responsibility of the clerk to the house, after submission to the "subcommittee on the journals." In the Commons the journal is passed by the Speaker before publication. The journals of the House of Commons begin in the first year of the reign of Edward VI. (1547), and are complete, except for a short interval under Elizabeth. Those of the House of Lords date from the first year of Henry VIII. (1509). Before that date the proceedings in parliament were entered in the rolls of parliament, which extend from 1278 to 1503. The journals of the Lords are "records" in the judicial sense, those of the Commons are not (see Erskine May, Parliamentary Practice, 1906, pp. 201-202).

The term "journal" is used, in business, for a book in which an account of transactions is kept previous to a transfer to the ledger (see Book-Keeping), and also as an equivalent to a ship's log, as a record of the daily run, observations, weather changes, &c. In mining, a journal is a record describing the various strata passed through in sinking a shaft. A particular use of the word is that, in machinery, for the parts of a shaft which are in contact with the bearings; the origin of this meaning, which is firmly established, has not been explained.


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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

See also journal

German

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Etymology

From French journal

Noun

Journal n. (genitive Journals, plural Journale)

  1. (magazine) journal

Simple English

A journal or a diary is a book written by a person about their life. A journal could also be a daily record of events or business. It is a nonfiction form of writing. Personal journals are called diaries. A famous diarist was Anne Frank.








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