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Juan Samuel

Samuel as third base coach for the Baltimore Orioles in 2008
Second baseman
Born: December 9, 1960 (1960-12-09) (age 49)
San Pedro de Macorís, Dominican Republic
Batted: Right Threw: Right 
MLB debut
August 24, 1983 for the Philadelphia Phillies
Last MLB appearance
September 26, 1998 for the Toronto Blue Jays
Career statistics
Batting average     .259
Home runs     161
Stolen bases     396
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Juan Milton Samuel (born December 9, 1960 in San Pedro de Macorís, Dominican Republic) is a baseball coach and a former second baseman in Major League Baseball. From 1983 through 1998, Samuel played for the Philadelphia Phillies (1983-89), New York Mets (1989), Los Angeles Dodgers (1990-92), Kansas City Royals (1992, 1995), Cincinnati Reds (1993), Detroit Tigers (1994, 1995) and Toronto Blue Jays (1996-98). He batted and threw right-handed.

Contents

Baseball career

In a 16-season playing career, Samuel was a .259 hitter with 161 home runs and 703 RBI in 1720 games

Samuel was originally signed as a non-drafted free agent by the Philadelphia Phillies in 1980. A three-time All-Star, Samuel earned National League Rookie of the Year honors from The Sporting News in 1984, when he tied for the NL lead with 19 triples and placed second with 72 stolen bases setting a MLB rookie record (broken by Vince Coleman the following season).

In 1987, Samuel became the first player in major league history to reach double figures in doubles, triples, home runs and stolen bases in each of his first four major league seasons. A year later, he fell short by one triple to repeat his feat by fifth consecutive year.

During his majors career, Samuel collected 1,578 hits, 396 stolen bases, and also reached double figures in home runs nine times. A popular player in Philadelphia, he appeared in the 1983 World Series, going 0-for-1 in three games. Samuel, an aggressive hitter who infrequently drew bases on balls was once quoted as saying, "You don't walk off the Island (meaning his home country). You Hit."

Samuel was sent to the New York Mets during the 1989 midseason in the same transaction that brought Lenny Dykstra and Roger McDowell to Philadelphia.[1] He also played two and a half seasons both for the Dodgers and Tigers, spent a year in Cincinnati, had two brief stints with the Royals, and provided three years of good services for Toronto, pinch-hitting, serving as DH, and playing at first base, second, third, left field and right. He retired after the 1998 season.

Samuel holds the major league record for most at-bats by a right-handed hitter in one season with 701, set in 1984. That mark was also the most for any National League batter in a single campaign, later surpassed by Jimmy Rollins. He also tied an ML record for consecutive strikeout titles with four (1984-87), shared with Hack Wilson (1927-30) and Vince DiMaggio (1942-45). Samuel is tied for 146th place in career triples.

Post-playing career

Since retiring from play, Samuel has coached at various levels and in various roles. He coached third base for the Detroit Tigers in 2005 after having coached first base for the team since 1999. He managed the Double-A Binghamton Mets for the 2006 season, and was named the 3rd base coach for the Baltimore Orioles in October 2006, where he has remained through 2009.

In August 2008, Samuel was inducted into the Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame at Citizens Bank Park.

Personal life

Samuel has a son named Samuel, whose name therefore is Samuel Samuel. The two names are pronounced differently, thus making it Sam-yull Sam-well.

References

External links

Preceded by
Tom Trebelhorn
Baltimore Orioles 3rd Base Coach
2007-present
Succeeded by
incumbent
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