Jupp Heynckes: Wikis

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Jupp Heynckes
Personal information
Full name Josef Heynckes
Date of birth 9 May 1945 (1945-05-09) (age 64)
Place of birth    Mönchengladbach, Germany
Playing position Striker
Club information
Current club Bayer 04 Leverkusen (Head Coach)
Senior career1
Years Club App (Gls)*
1963–1967
1967–1970
1970–1978
Borussia Mönchengladbach
Hannover 96
Borussia Mönchengladbach
082 0(50)
086 0(25)
226 (168)   
National team
1967–1976 West Germany 039 0(14)
Teams managed
1979–1987
1987–1991
1992–1994
1994–1995
1995–1997
1997–1998
1999–2000
2000–2001
2003–2004
2006–2007
2009
2009–
Borussia Mönchengladbach
Bayern Munich
Athletic Bilbao
Eintracht Frankfurt
CD Tenerife
Real Madrid
SL Benfica
Athletic Bilbao
Schalke 04
Borussia Mönchengladbach
Bayern Munich
Bayer 04 Leverkusen

1 Senior club appearances and goals
counted for the domestic league only.
* Appearances (Goals)

Josef "Jupp" Heynckes (born 9 May 1945 in Mönchengladbach, Germany) is a German football coach and former player.

Contents

Biography

As a player, he was a prolific striker. He mainly played for Borussia Mönchengladbach, where he won four national championships, one cup and one UEFA Cup. He won the 1972 European Football Championship and the 1974 FIFA World Cup with the German national team.

Heynckes has coached for Borussia Mönchengladbach, Bayern Munich, where he achieved two German championships, and Real Madrid, where he won the European Champions League 1998.

Career as Player

Heynckes played 385 matches in the German Bundesliga, scoring 220 goals. His tally is the third highest in this league, after Gerd Müller's (365 goals) and Klaus Fischer's (268 goals).

He started his playing career in 1964 with Borussia Mönchengladbach who were in the second division. In 1965 the club was promoted to the Bundesliga. Heynckes stayed on for two more years and then left for Hannover 96, where he spent three years.

He returned to Mönchengladbach in 1970, and stayed there until the end of his career in 1978. In this period he won four championships (1971, 1975, 1976 and 1977), the national cup in 1973 and the UEFA Cup in 1975.

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National team

Heynckes played 39 times for the German national team and scored 14 times. He won the European Championship of 1972 with Germany, where he took part in the final at the 3-0 victory against the USSR. He was also part of the squad that won the 1974 FIFA World Cup in Germany, but he played only for one half of a game during the tournament.

Career as Coach

After his playing career, he stayed on with Borussia Mönchengladbach and served the club for eight more years as coach, succeeding Udo Lattek in this position.

Between 1987 and 1991 he coached Bayern Munich. In this period, he achieved two German championships with the club (1989 and 1990).

After moving to Eintracht Frankfurt in 1994–95 he clashed with players Anthony Yeboah, Jay-Jay Okocha and Maurizio Gaudino which led to their eventual departure from the club. Eintracht's Eagles were relegated that season.

After a two-year tenure he moved to CD Tenerife, Athletic Bilbao and Real Madrid (1997–98). There he celebrated his greatest triumph, when, in 1998 and after a 32-year dry spell, he returned the Champions League trophy to Madrid. However, the lack of domestic success saw his tenure terminated by the end of that season. Heynckes then joined SL Benfica before returning to Athletic Bilbao.

Heynckes made a comeback in the Bundesliga when he took over Schalke 04 at the beginning of the 2003–04 season. His contract there was cut short in September 2004.

In May 2006, he was announced as the new coach of Borussia Mönchengladbach. On 31 January 2007 he retired after fourteen consecutive Bundesliga matches without win and Borussia dropping to 17th place in the table.[1]

Heynckes took over as caretaker coach of Bayern Munich on 27 April 2009[2] following the sacking of Jürgen Klinsmann.[3][4] On 5 June 2009 Bayer 04 Leverkusen announced his signing. He replaced Bruno Labbadia who moved to Hamburger SV.[5]

Statistics

Player

Period Club Matches/Goals Titles Caps
1966-67
1970-78
Bor.Mönchengladbach 283 / 195 Championship: 1971, 75, 76, 77
German Cup: 1973
38
1967-70 Hannover 96 86 / 25 1
1967-76 Germany 39 / 14 European Championship: 1972
World Cup: 1974
39

Coach

Period Club Titles
1979–87 Borussia Mönchengladbach
1987–91 Bayern Munich German Championship: 1989, 1990

German Supercup:1987, 1990

1992–94 Athletic Bilbao
1994–95 Eintracht Frankfurt
1996–97 CD Tenerife
1997–98 Real Madrid European Champions League 1998
1999–00 SL Benfica
2001–03 Athletic Bilbao
2003–04 Schalke 04 Intertoto Cup: 2003, 2004
2006–07 Borussia Mönchengladbach
2009 Bayern Munich
2009– Bayer 04 Leverkusen

References

Links

Preceded by
Germany Ottmar Hitzfeld
UEFA Champions League Winning Coach
1997-1998
Succeeded by
Scotland Alex Ferguson

Simple English

Jupp Heynckes
Personal information
Full name Josef Heynckes
Date of birth 9 May 1945 (1945-05-09) (age 65)
Place of birth    Mönchengladbach, Germany
Height 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in)
Playing position Striker (retired)
Senior clubs
Years Club
1964-1967
1967-1970
1970-1978
Borussia Mönchengladbach
Hannover
Borussia Mönchengladbach
National team
1967-1976 West Germany
Teams managed
1979-1987
1987-1991
1992-1994
1994-1995
1996-1997
1997-1998
1999-2000
2000-2001
2003-2004
2006-2007
2009-
Borussia Mönchengladbach
Bayern Munich
Athletic Bilbao
Eintracht Frankfurt
Tenerife
Real Madrid
Benfica
Athletic Bilbao
Schalke
Borussia Mönchengladbach
Bayern Munich

Jupp Heynckes (born 9 May, 1945) is a former German football player. He has played for West Germany national team.

Club career statistics

[1]

Club Performance League
SeasonClubLeague AppsGoals
GermanyLeague
1964-65Borussia MönchengladbachRegionalliga2523
1965-66Bundesliga2712
1966-673015
1967-68HannoverBundesliga2910
1968-69349
1969-70236
1970-71Borussia MönchengladbachBundesliga3319
1971-723119
1972-733328
1973-743330
1974-753127
1975-762412
1976-772015
1977-782118
CountryGermany 394243
Total 394243

International career statistics

[2]

Germany national team
YearAppsGoals
196722
196800
196910
197030
197170
197260
197363
197462
197554
197633
Total3914

References


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