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Up to date as of January 23, 2010

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This is the first draft of the revised M&E Handbook. Certain portions may still be incomplete. We would like to solicit comments and suggestions on how to make this manual useful and user-friendly. June 30, 2007

Contents

PREFACE

This is the latest version of an evolving KALAHI-CIDSS M&E Handbook. It is focused on the practice of M&E in KALAHI-CIDSS, both as a management tool for DSWD and a tool for learning. It covers both internal and external M&E at various levels (barangay, municipal, regional and national).

The Handbook is an accompanying manual to the KALAHI-CIDSS Community Empowerment Activity Cycle Field Guide. This Handbook, to a large extent, revolves around the CEAC.To monitor KALAHI-CIDSS properly, especially at the field level, it is best to be familiar with the CEAC, the purpose of the CEAC activity, and how such activity will contribute to the accomplishment of the project’s objectives.

Is KALAHI-CIDSS implementation on the right track toward meeting its development objective? It is hoped that this Handbook will provide stakeholders in communities and the Project a more systematic tool to answer this important M&E question.

The Handbook is designed for use of all KALAHI-CIDSS implementers, especially M&E officers. It is outlined as follows:

Part I - KALAHI-CIDSS M&E Overview Part II - Doing Internal Monitoring & Evaluation • Monitoring the Key Participatory Mechanisms (CEAC) • Organizing and Storing Data • Reporting Progress, Results and Implementation Needs

Part III - External Monitoring & Evaluation

Part IV - Annexes

M&E officers using this Handbook should supplement their knowledge and skills on M&E by reading other reference materials. Definition of terms used in this Handbook draw heavily from various sources on monitoring and evaluation.



Sparse Text Of M&E Handbook Part 1



KALAHI-CIDSS M&E OVERVIEW

KALAHI-CIDSS monitoring and evaluation (M&E) aims to: (i) anticipate problems before they occur, thus help avoid potential failure or shortcomings that may arise, and (ii) to process the lessons learned for improving design during implementation or applying the lessons to other projects or programs.


Monitoring and evaluation is used to track progress and accomplishment of project “deliverables”, and to track outcomes. Deliverables are the outputs of the project; the outcomes are the developmental changes resulting from use of the outputs.

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KALAHI-CIDSS Logframe

The causal relationship between project inputs, outputs and outcomes is outlined in the KALAHI-CIDSS logframe (Figure 1). KALAHI-CIDSS has three project components: capacity-building and implementation support, community grants, and monitoring and evaluation.


Figure 1: KALAHI-CIDSS Logframe

How KALAHI-CIDSS intends to achieve its development objectives is shown in the Results Framework (Table 1). By providing grants, communities can implement community projects that are at par with technical standards and within budget. From these completed community projects, they can derive benefits that are responsive to their needs. These benefits can be sustained if they maintain the community project.

By building capabilities, communities will learn to conduct participatory situational analysis, develop their own project proposals, mobilize resources for their needs, monitor actions on their priority problems and participate in decisions on fund allocation. The three years of implementation will provide the community with opportunities to learn to carry out these participatory practices. Communities are empowered if they are able to carry out these activities with their local government.

Since local government officials also benefit from the same capability-building activities, it is expected that they will involve communities in development initiatives, provide technical assistance to communities and counterpart for community activities and projects. As a consequence, local governance is improved.

Table 1: KALAHI-CIDSS Results Framework

Types of KALAHI-CIDSS M&E

To cross-validate M&E findings, both internal and external monitoring and evaluation are in place in KALAHI-CIDSS. (See Box 3 for definitions)

The internal M&E of project staff and communities tracks activities, processes, outputs and outcomes, and includes a community-based internal evaluation component. External M&E is performed by civil society, who conducts process evaluation of implementation. Another form of external M&E are the regular Supervision Missions conducted by The World Bank to track the efficiency and effectiveness of the Project.

Another type of external M&E is independent impact assessment of the project. The KALAHI-CIDSS impact assessment aims to identify changes brought about by the project. It consists of a baseline, mid-term and end-of-project evaluations.

M&E responsibilities of Project Staff

All project staff monitor and evaluate project implementation and achievement of results. Area Coordinating Teams have the primary responsibility of monitoring and evaluating the conduct of key participatory activities (CEAC). They are tasked to document and report their observations to the Regional Project Management Team. The Regional and National Management Teams use information gathered by the ACT to assesses, on a larger scale if the project is on track in achieving its objectives, enhance strategies, overcome or anticipate obstacles and inform policy, improve the project design and to report such findings to its various stakeholders at the regional and national level.

All project staff can benefit from M&E data. In subsequent sections, users and uses of specific forms are discussed.

INTERNAL MONITORING & EVALUATION

KALAHI-CIDSS Data Handling Process

Internal M&E involves collecting, organizing and analyzing data, processing these data into relevant information and reporting progress and outcomes against measures of expected project performance. Figure 2 shows the KALAHI-CIDSS data handling process. Most of the project data are generated when activities in the CEAC are conducted. Data are collected through the CEAC forms and through the outputs of the communities. These outputs include, but are not limited to, the PSA results, minutes of the MIBF or BA, and plans resulting from the community trainings. These documents are tagged critical documents. Data from these forms and critical outputs are stored and organized in project databases. Project databases are of two forms: 1) excel databases; and 2) hard databases, which are merely a paper collection of the critical outputs and CEAC forms. The data collected are analyzed and presented through a report.

Monitoring the CEAC

In KALAHI-CIDSS, the process is equally important as the desired outputs. The CEAC, through the key participatory mechanisms (KPM), suggests how communities and LGUs can jointly plan and implement development initiatives. The CEAC forms, mostly composed of key questions, aim to look at the quality of the conduct of these KPMs through the level of participation of the various stakeholders. It is important that those completing the forms become keen observers and sharp documenters of such observations.

The next section will discuss each CEAC form in detail.

SOCIAL INVESTIGATION

What is Social Investigation?

Social investigation is an iterative process that provides framework for prioritizing, gathering, analyzing, and incorporating social information and participation into the design and delivery of development operations. It is a systematic investigation of demographic, socioeconomic, social organization, socio-political context and needs and values.

Social investigation in KALAHI-CIDSS establishes the project baseline when done at the beginning of the first cycle. Through various data gathering methods, it aims to describe the political and socio-political dynamics and local poverty conditions of local government units and their constituents, development perspectives of local chief executives and key technical staff, and existing functionality of local planning bodies. When activities are conducted at the end of each cycle, social investigation attempts to identify interim project outcomes such as changes in local conditions, leaders’ perceptions and activity level of local planning bodies.

Since local conditions may considerably vary across municipalities, even barangays, social investigation is a critical evaluation undertaking that will account for differences in the achievement of development outcomes.

What do we monitor in when we conduct social investigation?

Social investigation captures information such as barangay and municipal socio-demographic profiles, inventory of development initiatives and projects, access to social services and infrastructure, and existence of community-based organizations. The functionality of the Barangay Development Council and the existence of the Barangay Development Plan are also established. Key stakeholders’ perceptions on participatory practices like collective decision-making, problem and solution identification and resource allocation are gathered.

Who are involved in the conduct of social investigation?

Social investigation is a team effort; therefore, all members of the Area Coordinating Team should be actively involved in the process. Other stakeholders such as the Mayor, members of the Municipal Inter-Agency Committee and the Barangay Captains are also engaged in the social investigation process.

What are the tools used in Social Investigation?

The ACT will make use of direct observation of the Barangay and Municipal Development Council Meetings, focus group discussions, interviews and secondary data gathering.

What forms should be filled out?

Since the Social Investigation is a comprehensive data gathering exercise that aims to establish baseline and identify interim outcomes, several forms using various data gathering methods are used. The following forms are filled out as part of the Social Investigation:

  • Barangay Social Investigation Form
  • Municipal Social Investigation Form
  • Mayor’s Interview Form
  • Barangay Captains’ Views Form
  • Municipal Inter-Agency Committee Views Form
  • Barangay Development Committee Meeting Form
  • Municipal Development Committee Meeting Form

How are these forms filled out?

Each form has a specific purpose. Generally, data for the Barangay and Municipal Social Investigation Forms are gathered from secondary data sources such as municipal and barangay records. However, the ACT may also take transect walks to collect data on access to social services and infrastructure and other development initiatives in the barangay or in the municipality.

Accomplishing the Barangay Social Investigation Form is the responsibility of the CF assigned to the Barangay. The AC should ensure validity of the information in the Barangay Social Investigation Form. The AC is responsible for collecting data for and ensuring that Municipal Social Investigation Form is accomplished. While the Municipal Social Investigation Form is similar to its Barangay counterpart, some information may require more than just aggregating the data from the Barangay Social Investigation form. In the interest of verifying the veracity of data gathered by the Barangay Social Investigation form, it is essential that other sources of municipal level data also be explored.

As the data from the social investigation is the ACT’s tool in analyzing local conditions and context in coming up with a strategy, these forms should be filled out prior to the conduct of the participatory situational analysis. Doing so will allow the CF to validate and triangulate data generated by during the social investigation and during the participatory situational analysis and should also aid the CF to better guide the PSA.


The Mayor’s Interview form requires that the AC talk to the mayor at the start of implementation (not later than a month after the project launch in the municipality, and/or the start of the succeeding cycle). The interview need not be formal; however, it is important that the mayor’s opinions on the questions in the form be captured.


The Barangay Captains’ Views form contains questions similar to the Mayor’s interview form. To collect the required information, the ACT may opt to conduct a focus group discussion or to conduct individual interviews whichever may be more convenient or feasible. Note that there are no funds allocated for the conduct of interviews or FGDs, therefore the ACT should strategize with this in mind. Should the ACT opt for interviews or several focus group discussions, all interviews and/or FGDs should be consolidated into one Barangay Captains’ Views Form before it is submitted to the M&E officer.


Since the Barangay Captains’ Views will be simultaneously collected, it is important that members conducting the interviews have a common understanding of the questions and if needed, agree on how the questions will be translated into the vernacular. Actual conduct of the interviews and FGDs is the responsibility of the CF, the AC should ensure that the Barangay Captains’ Views form is correctly filled out and submitted to the Regional M&E Officer.

While the Mayor’s Interview and Barangay Captains’ Views forms are very qualitative, brief, concise but substantial and complete answers (about four to five sentences) are highly encouraged.

Other forms to be filled out are the Barangay Development Council Meeting Form and the Municipal Development Council Form. These forms, however, will only be filled out if BDC or MDC meetings are held during the conduct of the cycle 1 Social Investigation. How to fill up these forms is discussed in the Critical Meetings Form section of this Manual.

Who are the users of these forms?

The information generated by these forms is useful to:

ACT – This information can be used to calibrate their plan to implement the CEAC. It also gives them an idea of the level of functionality of planning bodies in the barangay and municipality, knowledge of which can aid the team in designing the appropriate strategy for engaging these bodies. Social Marketing Officers – The Mayors’, Municipal Inter-Agency Committee Members’ and Barangay Captains’ views on community participation, relationship between and among the Barangay and Municipal Local Government Units and Community members are key in formulating the core messages that the project needs to get across. Information gathered after the end of each cycle will allow the project to track the key stakeholders’ perception on participatory approaches to governance.

CDD Process Specialist – All forms used in the social investigation will provide the community process specialist of the local context and social dynamics in the communities. This knowledge is critical in assessing the technical assistance needs of the ACTs and drawing appropriate strategies to engage local government units and enhance the community participation.

Project Manager – By gathering baseline and end-of-cycle information, these forms inform the Project Manager on the progress along the development objectives. Knowing whether the project is on track in achieving its objectives will also help management in reviewing and improving current strategies, identify project areas that may need further support and by sharing information and soliciting feedback from relevant stakeholders, strengthen the project’s transparency and accountability mechanisms.

What databases have to be filled up?

The Municipal databases are updated based on the data generated by the Barangay and Municipal Social Investigation forms. Other forms filled out are filed in their respective barangay and municipal folders.

What reports do these forms generate?

If the Social Investigation is conducted during the first cycle, the Barangay and Municipal Pre-Entry Reports are generated; if done at the end of the first and second cycles, Barangay and Municipal End-of-Cycle Reports are produced; and if done at the end of the third cycle, the Barangay and Municipal Completion Reports are written.

These reports are meant to consolidate all data gathered through various tools and forms into a report that summarizes the local context and community dynamics along the Project’s development objectives.

BARANGAY ASSEMBLY

What is the Barangay Assembly?

The barangay assembly is a gathering of all barangay residents who are at least 15 years old and above, Filipino and listed in the records as members of the barangay assembly (as defined in the Local Government Code, R.A. 7160). It serves as the primary mechanism for the exercise of popular citizenship. It is the foundation where the people can make claims from government over the delivery of basic services and facilities, demand transparency, and even exercise their supreme right to govern.

What do we monitor during the Barangay Assembly?

The following are monitored during the Barangay Assembly:

Objectives & Key Discussion Points – Participatory local governance hinges on a functional barangay assembly, which serves as a venue for consultations, decision-making, information sharing and feedback crucial to promoting accountability and transparency.

Monitoring objectives and subsequent discussions in a barangay assembly will give a sense of how functional the barangay assemblies are.

Quality of Facilitation – As with any meeting, quality of facilitation plays a critical role in determining the success of the assembly. It is important to provide feedback on the facilitation to improve facilitation skills and to maximize the discussions during assemblies.

Behaviors & Attitudes – In order to sustain the functionality of the Barangay Assembly, it is important that each member of the assembly appreciate the importance of actively participating in it. Individuals’ behaviors and attitudes in the assembly serve as indicators of interest in and appreciation of the process.

How is the Barangay Assembly monitored?

To monitor the conduct and quality of the barangay assembly, Barangay Assembly form is used to describe the objectives, key discussion points, and observations on the conduct and suggestions on how to improve the barangay assembly.

The questions should be answered briefly but completely. Answers in bullet forms are acceptable. Remember the following guidelines in answering the questions:

  • Describe the specific objectives of the barangay assembly. It is not necessary to copy the activity objectives from the project documents. When discussing the key points raised, only capture the major key points and who raised the points. In cases of arguments, document both sides and specific sectors involved in the debate as well as the final resolution. The CFs insights may also be helpful especially in explaining the context as this will most likely not be discussed in the minutes of the barangay assembly.
  • In case the community facilitator is the one facilitating the barangay assembly, s/he may reflect on how s/he conducted the barangay assembly, noting strong and weak facilitation skills. The community facilitator may also solicit feedback from members of the Barangay Assembly, focusing on how improve the conduct of the barangay assembly and encourage participation.


The community facilitator is responsible for filling out the form. The Area Coordinator should review the filled out form.

What databases have to be filled out?

The Barangay Assembly Form is the source document of the Barangay Assembly Database. The Barangay Assembly Form is filed in its respective barangay folder.

PARTICIPATORY SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS

What is the Participatory Situational Analysis?

Participatory Situation Analysis (PSA) is a systematic, semi-structured and flexible method of acquiring information.It is a method of collective information sharing and analysis that can be used for a variety of purposes, including but not limited to strengthening organizations, design and implementation of programs and projects, monitoring and evaluation, and drafting of community development plans.

What form should be filled out?

The Participatory Situational Analysis Form is used to monitor the PSA.

What do we monitor during the PSA?

Apart from monitoring whether or not the PSA was conducted, the quality of the PSA is also of primary concern. It is important to look at the participation of the PSA volunteers in terms of who are actively participating in the activity, what were the key discussion points raised by the communities as they identify their pressing problems, as well as their behavior and attitudes as they conduct the PSA.

Monitoring behavior and attitudes is relevant because the use of participatory problem identification (or any participatory methods for that matter) requires certain social behaviors – it requires that a person take into account another self. In the case of the PSA, where the barangay’s most pressing problems are identified, involves a certain level of openness and selflessness especially when subsequent resource allocation decisions will be based on the PSA.

Who are involved in the monitoring the PSA?

The community facilitator assigned to the barangay is primarily responsible for ensuring that the form is properly filled out in a timely manner. The Area Coordinator should check the filled out form prior to submission to the Regional M&E Officers, ensuring that the information is valid.

Community volunteers can also be involved if the CF can allot three to five minutes at the end of the PSA to reflect on the activity conducted. This will also allow for a variety of perspectives and can result to a more insightful evaluation.

How is the PSA form filled out?

Since social assessment and investigation has been previously conducted, the PSA results can be validated against it. Conversely, SI results can be validated against the PSA. It is important to use secondary data and to triangulate the data gathered to ensure that communities analyze based on available data. It is important to remember that the PSA is not the primary data gathering activity for the social investigation. In the PSA form, note similarities and discrepancies in the data gathered in the PSA and the SI.

The CF should keenly observe how the volunteers participated in the PSA. The CF should look out for the following:

  • Participation of representatives from marginalized sectors like women, youth, elderly, persons with disabilities or indigenous peoples groups, whenever or whichever is applicable.
  • Participation of local government officials (both municipal and barangay)
  • Participation of community-based organizations, people’s organizations or non government agencies
  • Persons who dominate the discussion
  • Persons who do not speak at all
  • Attitudes and behavior of participants as they go through the activity

Over time or across cycles, it is important to monitor changes in how various sectors participate during the PSA and in behaviors or attitudes of participants.

While the PSA is an activity-oriented learning process, not all the learnings will ultimately feed into the final PSA results. Key issues discussed should also be noted down in the PSA form. It is important to capture who or which group raised what points. If in case contentious issues were discussed, what arguments for and against the issue were raised by whom, and the final resolution are the only important details that need to be documented.

How the PSA was conducted should also be documented. During the first cycle, it is important that the CF also be critical of how s/he facilitated the process. Objective evaluation of one’s own performance may be difficult but can greatly enhance one’s skills. The CEAC manual contains some facilitation tips. For learning purposes, the CF should document facilitation techniques used and the results of applying such techniques. The CF may also ask for feedback from PSA participants to help him/her improve.

If other members of the community or the LGU facilitate the subsequent PSA, the CF should also note down observations on how the PSA was conducted with the purpose of giving feedback to the facilitator.

Who are the users of the PSA form?

CDD Process Specialists/Regional Training Coordinators and Associates – The PSA forms can be used to assess training needs of project staff, LGU counterparts and community volunteers.

Project Management – As a process documentation of the PSA, it is extremely useful in tracking changes in PSA facilitation roles, quality of analysis and community ownership and subsequent adoption of the PSA process.

What databases have to be filled out?

The community volunteers database should be updated with the names of the PSA volunteers.

The PSA forms and attachments are also filed in the barangay folder.

PROJECT DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP

What is the Project Development Workshop (PDW)?

The Project Development Workshop is a training activity. It involves a hands-on capability building process where community volunteers discuss and decide the suitability and technical feasibility of interventions based on existing resources and capacity During this training activity, they are provided technical assistance inputs on the four key areas of the project development cycle. The expected output of the PDW is the sub-project proposal.

What do we monitor in a Project Development Workshop?

We monitor the following from a Project Development Workshop:

  • The discussions of the community’s identified problems, the range of possible solutions to each problem, and discussions of how the possible solutions will address each problem;
  • The problem the community chooses to address, and the solution that they will develop into a community project;
  • The difficulties the community and LGU encountered during project development;
  • The level and quality of participation of the community and LGU in the project development process;

Who are involved in monitoring the Project Development Workshop?

Since each barangay will develop its own proposal, the Community Facilitator is responsible in ensuring that the Project Development Workshop Form is properly filled out.

However, because ACT members are the main facilitators for the PDW, all members should be involved in monitoring the Project Development Workshop. Each member should provide inputs to each question in the Project Development Workshop Form. Their responses should be in line with their responsibility as outlined in the CEAC field guide, For example, the DAC should relate difficulties encountered in identifying options for appropriate interventions and in preparing and reviewing the technical proposals.

It is recommended that all stakeholders engaged in the PDW also be involved in monitoring the process. This can be done by asking them about what they found easy or difficult in undertaking the process.

How should the Project Development Workshop Form be filled out?

The Project Development Workshop Form is the main process document for monitoring the PDW. The sub-project proposal is the expected output of the PDW; therefore, the PDW form will be continuously updated during the two-month project development and planning phase. The updated form should be submitted monthly to the Regional RM&E Officer.

Who are the users of the PDW Form?

What databases are filled out?

Community Volunteers Database.

COMMUNITY TRAINING

What is Community Training?

People’s participation in community affairs is imperative to achieve the kind of development. In order to achieve this, people need to capacitate themselves on needed knowledge, skills and attitude in order to efficiently and effectively address issues and concerns on community development. Capacity building through community training in this context is defined as the creation of competent community people in attaining certain development objectives on a sustainable process. Criteria for the capacity enhancement process will be determined by the objectives in the context of the development activity.

What form should be filled out?

The Community Training Form is used to monitor community training.

What do we monitor during the Community Training?

Information being gathered about community training includes details of the training, e.g., topic and the resource persons and the participants in every barangay, actual cost of training, expected outputs and training objectives. Further, training results are also being assessed to determine the training/development needs of the community.

Who are involved in the monitoring the Community Training?

The ACT is responsible in monitoring the conduct of community training in the barangay, in coordination with the RTA, RTC and RM&E in the region. All project stakeholders are encouraged to go through a community training so as to enhance their knowledge, skills as well as attitude in the implementation of their project/s. Groups and individuals from the community, e.g. barangay officials, community leaders, community-based organizations, representatives of various sectors, sitios or puroks, community volunteers and other concerned groups and individuals will engage in capacity enhancement facilitated by the ACT.

How is the Community Training form filled out?

The ACT is largely the responsible group in the community training preparation, actual conduct and post training activities. Thus, the Community Training form is being filled-up by the CF, in coordination with the AC, RTA, and RTC, in every training that is conducted in the Barangay.

Who are the users of the Community Training form?

Information on community training is being consolidated at the NPMO. The community training report provide the project information regarding the capability building activities conducted and the number of community volunteers trained by the project. These capability building activities are in fulfillment of the empowerment objective of the project.

What databases have to be filled out?

The Community Training Form is being used to fill-up the Community Training database and community volunteers database.

SUB-PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION

What is the Sub-Project Implementation?

The Sub-Project Implementation (SPI) commenced after the 5th BA. It is the period where the construction and implementation of sub-projects are being undertaken and is expected to last up to six (6) months. During this time, the CFs are expected to continually provide assistance to communities in the implementation of their sub-projects.

During SPI, a number critical activities are being undertaken, as follows:

  • The finalization of barangay development plans incorporating concerns in the BAPs, and the formation, re-organization of the Barangay Development Council in all barangays.
  • Monitoring of implementation of community action plans to address other concerns from the barangay action plan (BAP) resulting from the PSA, as well as the formation of community-based mechanisms to address these concerns in all barangays.
  • Organizational development and the creation of appropriate organizational arrangements for sub-project operation and maintenance in prioritized barangays.
  • Mobilization of community members and the creation of structures to address resource requirements for non-prioritized sub-project proposals of non-prioritized barangays.

What form should be filled out?

The Sub-Project Implementation Form (SPI Form) is used to monitor the SPI.

What do we monitor during the SPI?

During the Sub-project Implementation, the following are being monitored: (1) sub-projects information, which includes the sub-project title, brief description of the SP, target duration of implementation, estimated sub-project cost and proposed budget of the sub-project; (2) information on operation and management schemes; (3) procurement; (4) physical progress of the project; (5) fund utilization status; (6) status of delivery of the LCCs; (7) community and LGU participation in sub-project implementation; (8) transparency mechanism; and (9) project completion details. Monitoring of community trainings and community volunteers are also conducted during this stage.

It also requires the attachment of Program of Works, Sub-Project Concept form and work schedule and physical progress report.

Who are involved in the monitoring the SPI?

The community facilitator (CF) primarily monitors the SPI activities. Together with the, Deputy Area Coordinator (DAC), the Area Coordinator (AC), and the Roving Bookkeeper, they ensure that the SPI form is properly filled out in a timely manner.

The counterpart staff from the municipal government particularly those who are members of the Municipal Inter-Agency Committee (MIAC) join the conduct of monitoring activities and also provide technical assistance to the community volunteers.

How is the SPI form filled out?

The monitoring forms used during sub-project implementation aims to provide the project the latest update on sub-project implementation.

The physical and financial form contains information on the amount of grant funds allocated and downloaded as well as the amount of local counterpart contribution committed and delivered. It also tracks the percentages of utilization of both funds. The form also contains information on the physical progress of implementation on a month-on-month basis. The needed information for the SPI Form are being gathered by the CF, in coordination with the DAC, AC, Roving Bookkeeper, and community volunteers.

For operations and management scheme, information are generated from the minutes of the meetings of the Barangay Sub-Project Management Committee (BSPMC)

The community training form captures information on the community volunteers who participated during sub-project implementation. The number of volunteers attending trainings (gender disaggregated) and some socio-demographic information are also collected. The volunteers also monitors the progress of the project from procurement to implementation and whatever issues that may arise during the process.

Who are the users of the SPI form?

The regionally consolidated physical and financial reports/databases are submitted monthly to the M&E Unit of the National Project Management Office (NPMO) for national consolidation and analysis.

The physical and financial form provide the both the Barangay Sub-Project Management Committee (BSPMC) and the project management team from the ACT to the NPMO information regarding the physical progress of the project and update regarding the release of grant funds and local counterpart contribution and the rate of utilization of these funds. The information is used to assess progress and identify bottlenecks in the project implementation.

What databases have to be filled out?

The physical and financial form feeds into the physical and financial database, physical database the local counterpart contribution database, CEAC progress tracking chart and the progress request for fund transfer.

Community participation is used in filling-out the community trainings and community volunteer database.

CRITICAL MEETINGS

What are Critical Meetings?

Critical meetings are meetings that are conducted by key community bodies, which lead to the passing of important resolutions or decisions that have bearings on the implementation of the Project.

The Critical Meetings that the Project will monitor are the following:

  • Barangay Development Council Meetings
  • Municipal Development Council Meetings
  • Municipal Inter-Agency Committee (MIAC) Meetings

What do we monitor in Critical Meetings?

For BDC Meetings, we monitor the integration of Barangay Action Plans (BAP) into the Barangay Development Plan (BDP). We also monitor the passing of resolutions, particularly those that adopt Community-Driven Development (CDD) principles and processes that are being imparted by the Project. We also look at the measures that the BDC undertakes to ensure the sustainability of these CDD principles and processes.

For MDC Meetings, we monitor the integration of BDPs into the Municipal Development Plan (MDP). We also monitor which BAP items were eventually integrated into the MDP. As with the BDC, we also monitor the passing of resolutions, particularly those that adapt the CDD principles and processes that are being implemented by the Project. We also look at the municipal appropriations report, and see how much the MLGU spends on BAP priorities compared to other MLGU budget items. We also look at the measures that the MDC undertakes to ensure the sustainability of these CDD principles and processes.

For MIAC Meetings, we monitor the issues that the Committee discusses on and the decisions that the MIAC makes. We also look into the technical assistance that the MIAC provides to the communities.

Who are involved in monitoring Critical Meetings?

The Area Coordination Teams (ACTs) are in charge of monitoring Critical Meetings.

What are the tools used?

Monitoring Critical Meetings will make use of direct observation through review of documents, particularly minutes of meetings and resolutions passed.

What forms should be filled out?

Each meeting has a corresponding form. Thus, there are three forms that are relevant in monitoring Critical Meetings, which are to be filled out after each meeting:

  • BDC Meeting Form
  • MDC Meeting Form
  • MIAC Meeting Form

How are these forms filled out?

Though the 3 relevant forms are separate, they are very similar in the questions that they ask and the information that they capture.

The attachments are likewise similar across the forms; these will provide the information that are needed to accomplish the forms. It is important to reflect all key points, arguments, agreements, decisions and resolutions that came about in the meeting. Items should be brief but clear; in this light the use of bullet points or outlines may be helpful. The minutes of the meeting, which will be attached to the form, will help in the accomplishment of the form.

When are these forms submitted?

The forms are to be submitted by the AC/CF on a quarterly basis. The ACT should also keep copies of the forms in file, which should be accessible and available at all times.

To whom are these forms submitted?

The forms for Critical Meetings are to be submitted to the RPMT through the Regional M&E Officers.

What are the uses of these forms?

The forms for Critical Meetings are used to monitor indicators for Institutionalization and improved local governance, to see if the Project is effective in achieving its development objectives in these areas. In The forms can also provide Project Management information on issues and concerns in the Project areas, for which strategies and enhancements in implementation can be made.

Who are the users of these forms?

Monitors and evaluators of the Project, both internal and external, can use the forms to track the performance of the Project or the community in terms of achieving its targets in Institutionalization and improvement in local governance. Project Management can also use the forms to identify issues and concerns that need intervention. The Project’s M&E Officers will use the forms to update the Documents Database and as a source of inputs to the Local Governance Report.

What databases have to be filled up?

The pertinent database for Critical Meetings is the Documents Database. This database is updated and submitted by the Regional M&E Officer to the NPMO on a quarterly basis.

What reports do these forms and databases feed into?

The forms feed into the Local Governance Report. The report highlights, among others, the Project’s achievements in improving local governance, which is reflected in the activities of the LGUs, particularly in passing resolutions that support CDD and in involving the people in planning and resource allocation processes.

POST SUB-PROJECT COMPLETION FORM

What is the Post Sub-Project Implementation Completion?

A Transition Stage follows the completion of sub-project implementation. These include post-SPI completion activities such as the conduct of the (1) Operation and Maintenance, following the O&M plan developed from the PSA and finalized during the SPI stage; (2) the conduct of the Community-based Evaluation (CBE); and (3) the conduct of the Municipal Accountability Review and Reporting (MAR). Once completed, the Municipality can move on to the implementation of the 2nd Cycle of the CEAC.

What form should be filled out?

The Post Sub-Project Completion Form is used to monitor the Post SPI.

What do we monitor in Post Sub-Project Implementation?

Brief information about the sub-project is being obtained including the date of completion and inauguration. Operations and maintenance schemes and its status of implementation are also discussed, including the cash flow of the sub-projects. Also monitored are the community and LGU participation in the O&M, the transparency mechanisms, and the results of physical monitoring and sub-projects benefits, as well as the community’s monitoring plans and the actions taken on the plans.

Who are involved in the monitoring the Post Sub-Project Implementation?=

The ACT is responsible in monitoring the post sub-project implementation in the area. The DAC monitors the status of O&M activities. Community volunteers and MIAC also engage in monitoring the operationalization of the sub-projects.

How is the Post Sub-Project Implementation form filled out?

The ACT gathers information in the field during the conduct of barangay assemblies and Focused Group Discussion. SPI Forms are being filled up by the any member of the ACT, in coordination with the community volunteers and local officials. SP Evaluation results are also attached in the Post SPI Form.

Who are the users of the Post SPI form?

Information provided by the Post SPI Form is used by the both the concerned Local Government officials and the project management team from the ACT to the NPMO. Information are important in monitoring the sustainability and operationalization of the sub-projects in the community.

What databases have to be filled out?

Information gathered in the Post SP Completion Form is used to fill-up the Physical and Financial database and Physical database.

COMMUNITY-BASED EVALUATION

What is Community-Based Evaluation (CBE)?

The CBE is a participatory interim impact evaluation process where the community thinks and talks about changes, and are involved in the generation, analysis and understanding of information. It aims to obtain the views of the community about the changes generated by the Project through a series of workshops and discussions.

What do we monitor in CBE?

The CBE determines interim impacts and changes on knowledge, attitudes, practices (behavior) and well-being generated by the Project through its interventions, particularly on the areas of empowering communities; improving local governance; and reducing poverty. It also seeks to determine the causes of the changes, when they occurred and how important they are to the community.

For prioritized barangays, the CBE determines the changes brought about by the subprojects that were implemented in the community.

Specifically, the CBE is used to monitor the following:

  • Effects of investments on social preparation
  • Subproject benefits (for prioritized barangays)
  • Subproject benefits’ effect on household production and consumption patterns (for prioritized barangays)
  • Number of households benefiting from subprojects (for prioritized barangays)
  • Negative impacts or effects of the Project on the community
  • Causes of negative impacts
Who are involved in monitoring CBE?

Regional M&E Officers are responsible for administering and monitoring CBE at the regional and barangay levels. They are also responsible for the accomplishment and submission of the CBE Form, and the maintenance of the CBE database at the regional level.

The NPMO will likewise maintain a CBE database, which is a consolidation of the regional CBE databases.

What are the tools used in monitoring CBE?

The CBE is an activity that makes use of focused group discussions (FGD) and workshops.

What forms should be filled out?

The M&E forms required for the CBE are the documentations of the workshop/FGD outputs of the CBE activity, particularly on the following::

  • Timeline of Change calendar
  • Categorization of Change matrix
  • Cause-effect Diagram
  • Domains of Change matrix

How are the forms filled out?

The CBE process as described in the Community Empowerment Activity Cycle (CEAC) Manual has six (6) steps, namely:

  • Warm-up
  • Time-line of Change
  • Sub-group Brainstorming
  • Categorization of Change
  • Cause-effect Diagram
  • Domains of Change

Steps b, d, e and f of the CBE involve the setting up of diagrams or matrices through the use of meta-cards. The documentation of these (i.e. capturing the diagrams/matrices in MS Word or Excel as they appear in the CBE activity) will comprise the forms that will be required in the monitoring of CBE. These will also form part of the CBE report as attachments.

The contents of these forms are described in greater detail in the CEAC manual under the conduct of the CBE.

When are the forms due for submission?

The CBE forms are submitted as attachments to the CBE report, which in turn is submitted after the conduct of the CBE. The CBE will not be deemed completed until the CBE report, complete with the attachments (among which are the CBE forms) is received by the NPMO.

To whom are the forms submitted?

The CBE report and forms are submitted to the NPMO through the Project’s Development Communication Specialist. A copy of the report and forms shall be given to the M&E Unit, which may be in electronic format.

What are the uses of the forms?

The CBE forms are used to generate the CBE report. The forms are submitted along with the CBE report as attachments. The forms contain information on the impacts of the Project to the communities and will be used to evaluate the implementation of the Project, or to validate external evaluations of the Project.

Who are the users of the forms?

Regional M&E Officers will use the CBE Forms in preparing the CBE Report. The forms will also be used by Project Management at the regional and national levels to assess the impacts of the Project in the communities, and to come up with enhancements to implementation strategies.

To what reports do these forms feed into?

The CBE forms feed into the CBE report, which is the main output of the CBE process. These reports will be consolidated at the national level.

What databases should be filled out?

A CBE Database will be maintained both at the national and the regional levels, which shall be the output of a national-level CBE results consolidation activity.

The conduct of the CBE will also lead to the updating of the CEAC Progress Tracking Database, and will mark the completion of the implementation of a Project Cycle in a barangay.

ACCOUNTABILITY REVIEW

What is Accountability Review?

Accountability Review is a process by which a local government unit assesses its compliance to agreements, resolutions and requirements in its involvement with the Project; and identifies lessons learned and recommendations for subsequent cycles.

Accountability Review is done at 2 levels, at the barangay level and at the municipal level.

The Accountability Review is followed by an Accountability Reporting to the communities at the municipal level. BRTs report the results of their corresponding BLGU Accountability Reviews, followed by the MIAC’s report of the results of the MLGU Accountability Review.

What do we monitor in Accountability Review and Reporting?

The results of the Accountability Reports are to be monitored, particularly on the following:

BLGU Accountability Review:
  • The BLGU’s compliance to resolutions of Cycle 1
    • Barangay performance on participation and attendance in BAs
    • Compliance with accountability and transparency requirements
  • Resolution of local complaints and grievances
  • Lessons learned from KALAHI-CIDSS involvement
  • Passing of key resolutions
    • Adopting PSA in the preparation of the AIP or BDP
    • Confirming volunteers elected by the BA to review PSA results
    • Constituting the Special BA for grievance
    • Allocating funds or resources for community mobilization
    • Allocating BLGU SP counterpart
    • Supporting SP O&M, including budget support
  • Recommended resolutions to support implementation in subsequent Cycles
MLGU Accountability Review:
  • The MLGU’s compliance to the MOA
    • Provision of LCC for SP and CBIS
    • Provision of office space and equipment for ACT
    • MIAC Engagement in SP preparation and implementation
    • Resolutions supporting KC implementation
    • Other commitments
  • MLGU compliance to resolutions and accountability and transparency requirements
  • Identified Municipal LCC requirements (SP and CBIS) for the succeeding Cycles
  • Gaps and issues in participating in KALAHI-CIDSS
  • Lessons learned from KALAHI-CIDSS involvement
  • Recommendations for amendments in the MOA for subsequent Cycles

Who are involved in monitoring Accountability Review and Reporting?

Barangay-level activities (i.e. BDC Meetings and BAs) will be monitored by the CF assigned to the barangay. In the same manner, Municipal level activities (i.e. MDC and MIAC Meetings and the MIBF) will be monitored by the AC. The regional level monitoring and consolidation of barangay and municipal level information will be done by the Regional M&E Officer.

What are the tools used?

The ACT will make use of direct observation through the attendance in the Accountability Review and Reporting activities and review of the documentation and outputs of these activities.

What forms should be filled out?

Accountability Review and Reporting activities are conducted in the forms of BDC, MDC or MIAC Meetings, or MIBF and BAs. In light of this, the relevant forms for monitoring these activities are:

  • BDC Meeting Form
  • MDC Meeting Form
  • MIAC Meeting Form
  • MIBF Form
  • BA Form

How are these forms filled out?

The forms are not designed specifically for Accountability Review and Reporting, thus the AC or CF should be careful in filling these out. The important thing is to capture the items listed in item 2. (What do we monitor in Accountability Review and Reporting?) of this guide, as well as other important items that may be discussed during the Accountability Review and Reporting activities.

Entries in the forms may be written in bullet or outline forms so long as they can easily be understood and are supported by a few lines of explanation, as most of the information captured would be in narrative form. Supporting data or figures for some indicators, such as barangay participation/attendance rates in BAs will be useful. Also, the count of resolutions that were passed, per type should be determined.

When are these forms submitted?

The forms are submitted by the ACs and CFs to the RPMT through the M&E Officers on a quarterly basis.

To whom are these forms submitted?

The forms are submitted to the RPMT through the M&E Officers.

What are the uses of these forms?

The forms are used to determine the compliance of LGUs to their commitments to the Project, as well as determine the lessons learned from the implementation of KALAHI-CIDSS in their community. The accountability review and reporting also guides Project Management in formulating strategies, resolutions and amendments to succeeding Phases to enhance Project implementation.

Who are the users of these forms?

The forms are primarily for monitoring and evaluation, and for Project Management.

What databases have to be filled up?

The conduct of the Accountability Review and Reporting will be captured in the CEAC Progress Tracking Database, which will be accomplished by the Regional M&E Officer and submitted to the NPMO on a quarterly basis

What reports do these forms and databases feed into?

The forms on Accountability Review and Reporting feed into several reports, namely: Empowerment Report; Gender Report; Participation Report; Poverty Report; and Local Governance Report.

ORGANIZING AND STORING DATA

National Consolidated Physical and Financial Database

What is a National Consolidated Physical and Financial Database?

It is a database which provides valuable information regarding the statuses of sub-project implementation in terms physical and financial accomplishments in each area of concern.

What are the information captured by this database?

The information captured by the database are the following:

  • Sub-Project ID, which indicates the sub-project identification number or code;
  • Sub-Project Type which indicates the type of sub-project (e.g. bridge, common services, water stations and others);
  • Barangay Information which includes: Phase, Cycle, Region, Municipality, Barangay;
  • Project Name, it is the Sub-Project title/name;
  • Estimated Total Cost (P) 2nd Municipal Inter-Barangay Forum (MIBF), which indicates the estimated total cost of sub-project as approved in the 2nd MIBF;
  • KALAHI Grant, indicates the grant as approved also in the 2nd MIBF;
  • Community & Local Government Unit (LGU) Counterpart Commitments (LCC), indicates the Community & LGU Counterpart Commitments (LCC) as approved in the 2nd MIBF;
  • Grant Funds Released, indicates the actual amount of KALAHI-CIDSS grant released;
  • Tranches, indicates the actual number of tranches released over the total number of tranches for the Sub-Project;
  • LCC Delivered, indicates actual LCC amount delivered;
  • Total Utilized, indicates the actual total amount utilized by the sub-project (Grant Fund Utilized + LCC Utilized);
  • Grant Funds Utilized, indicates the actual amount of grant funds utilized;
  • LCC Utilized, indicates the actual amount of LCC utilized;
  • Percent Utilized from Grant released, indicates the percentage of the amount of grant funds utilized over the amount of grant fund released;
  • Percent LCC utilized over delivered, indicates the percentage of the amount of LCC utilized over the amount of LCC delivered;
  • Percent LCC delivered over committed, indicates the percentage of the amount of LCC delivered over the amount of committed LCC;
  • Percent Financial Accomplishment (Grant + LCC), indicates the percentage of the total amount utilized over the total amount of Sub-Project cost as per 2nd MIBF;
  • Percent of Physical Progress, indicates the current Physical Progress of the Sub-Project;
  • 1st MIBF Date and 2nd MIBF Date, indicates the actual date of the 1st and 2nd MIBF;
  • Start Date of Sub-Project Implementation (SPI), Completion Date, and Inauguration Date, indicates the actual date of start, completion and inauguration of the sub-project;
  • Number of Direct Beneficiaries, indicates the total number of Direct Household Beneficiaries of a Sub-Project;
  • Remarks, which indicates comments, problems, and actions taken during the implementation of the sub-project;
  • Number of Barangays, indicates the total number of barangays that benefited/shared to a single Sub-Project; and
  • Number of Sub-Projects indicates the number of Sub-Project and it is used to count the number of Sub-Projects.
What are the sources of this information?

The information needed for the database are gathered from the following forms: Physical and Financial Accomplishment Form, Sub-Project Implementation Form, Post Sub-Project Completion Form, MIBF Forms and reports from the Finance Unit.

Who are involved in updating the database?

The groups of people involved in updating the database are the Area Coordinating Teams (ACTs), Regional Infrastructure Engineer (RIE), Deputy Regional Infrastructure Engineer (DRIE), Regional Financial Analyst (RFA), and Regional Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Units.

How often is it updated?

The database is updated monthly during the Sub-Project Implementation-Operation and Maintenance (SPI-O&M) up to completion.

What are the related databases?

Related databases include MIBF databases, Tracking Chart, and Physical Database.

Municipal Inter-Barangay Forum (MIBF) Database

What is a Municipal Inter-Barangay Forum Database?

It is a database which provides information on the conduct of every Municipal Inter-Barangay Forum in each cycle of the KALAHI-CIDSS Program.

What are the information captured by this database?

The Municipal Inter-Barangay Forum information includes:

  • Region
  • Phase
  • Province
  • Municipality
  • Number of Barangays, indicates the total number of barangays in each municipality.
  • Cycle 1 to Cycle 3
    • 1st MIBF (Date), indicates the actual date of the 1st MIBF
      • Number of Barangays Attended, indicates the total number of barangays present in the forum.
      • Number of Men Attended indicates the total number of male who attended the forum.
      • Number of Women Attended indicates the total number of female who attended the forum.
    • 2nd MIBF (Date), indicates the actual date of the 2nd MIBF
      • Number of Barangays Attended, indicates the total number of barangays present in the forum.
      • Number of Men Attended indicates the total number of male who attended the forum.
      • Number of Women Attended indicates the total number of female who attended the forum.
What are the sources of this information?

The information needed for the database are gathered from MIBF Forms, as well as attachments (minutes) and MIBF resolution.

Who are involved in updating the database?

The groups of people involved in updating the database are Area Coordinators (ACs) and Regional M&E Units.

How often is it updated?

The database is updated after every conduct of MIBF; submission of reports and updates to the Central Office (C.O.) is done quarterly.

What are the related databases?

Related to this database is the Physical and Financial Database, in which the same information on the 1st and 2nd MIBF can be found.

National Consolidated Barangay Profile Database

What is a National Consolidated Barangay Profile Database?

It is a database which provides information on the demographic and physical characteristics of each barangay covered by the program.

What are the information captured by this database?

The information captured by the database are the following:

  • Phase
  • Region
  • Province
  • Municipality
  • Barangay
  • Poblacion Barangay, indicates whether the barangay is a Poblacion or not;
  • Number of Sitio or Purok, indicates the actual number of Sitio or Purok in each barangay;
  • Demographic Information includes:
    • Total Number of Household
    • Total Number of Population
      • Number of Men
      • Number of Women
      • Number of Children
    • Total Number of Voting Population
      • Number of Men Voting
      • Number of Women Voting
  • Terrain, indicates the topography of the barangay;
  • Indigenous People Areas, indicates whether there are IP areas in the barangay or none.
What are the sources of this information?

The information needed for the database are gathered from a Barangay Social Investigation (SI) Form

Who are involved in updating the database?

The groups of people involved in updating the database are Community Facilitators (CFs), ACs, and Regional M&E Units.

How often is it updated?

The database is updated during or after Social Investigation; if there are changes in the statistics or information mentioned above. The submission of reports and updates to the C.O. is done quarterly.

What are the related databases?

Related to the database is a Barangay Assembly Database, in which information on the Total Number of Household in each barangay can also be found.

National Consolidated Community Trainings Database

What is a National Consolidated Community Trainings Database?

It is a database that provides the information on the community trainings conducted in different barangays.

What are the information captured by this database?

The information captured by the database are the following:

  • Barangay Information:
    • Region
    • Municipality
    • Barangay
    • Phase
    • Cycle
  • Sources of Funds, indicates the source of funds for the training;
    • Date Conducted, indicates the actual date of conduct of the training;
    • Type of Training, indicates the type of training that was conducted in the community;
    • Total number of Male and Female, indicates the actual number of male and female participants;
    • Funds from Municipal Local Government Unit (MLGU), indicates the actual funds coming from the MLGU;
    • Funds from BLGU (Barangay Local Government Unit), indicates the actual funds coming from the BLGU;
    • Funds from Community, indicates the actual funds coming from the community;
    • Funds from Other Source, indicates the actual funds coming from other source;
What are the sources of this information?

The information needed for the database are gathered from a Community Training Form.

Who are involved in updating the database?

The groups of people involved in updating the database are CFs, ACs and the Regional M&E Units.

How often is it updated?

The database is updated after every conduct of trainings; submission of reports and updates to the C.O. is done quarterly.

What are the related databases?

Related to this database is the National Consolidated Community Volunteers Database, in which information on the types of trainings conducted in a community can also be found.

National Consolidated Non-Prioritized Database

What is a National Consolidated Non-Prioritized Database?

It is a database which provides information on barangays not prioritized for their sub-project implementation.

What are the information captured by this database?

The information captured by the database are the following:

  • Non-prioritized Barangay Information:
    • Region
    • Province
    • Municipality
    • Barangays
    • Phase
    • Cycle
    • Proposed SP, indicates the proposed sub-project for each barangay;
    • Total Project Cost, indicates the estimated total cost of the sub-project;
    • Requested KC Grant Amount, indicates the actual amount of KC grant requested;
    • LCC, indicates the amount of LCC;
    • Total Number of Direct Beneficiaries, indicates the number of direct beneficiaries;
    • Total Number of Actual Beneficiaries, indicates the actual number of beneficiaries;
  • Resource Generation Results:
    • Funded/Unfunded, indicates whether the sub-project has been funded or not;
    • Source of Fund, indicates the source of fund;
    • Amount Funded, indicates the actual amount given to the sub-project;
    • Date Funded, indicates the actual date that the sub-project was funded;
    • Status of SP Physical Accomplishment, indicates the percentage of physical accomplishment;
    • Date Started, indicates the actual start date for the sub-project implementation;
    • Date Completed, indicates the actual completion date of the sub-project;
    • Remarks, indicates comments, problems, and actions taken during the implementation of the sub-project.
What are the sources of this information?

The information needed for the database are gathered from MIBF Forms.

Who are involved in updating the database?

Updating of the database is done by the ACs and Regional M&E Units.

How often is it updated?

The database is updated after every conduct of MIBF; submission of reports and updates to the C.O. is done quarterly.

National Consolidated Barangay Assembly Database

What is a National Consolidated Barangay Assembly Database?

It is a database which provides information on the number of participants attending every Barangay Assemblies (BA).

What are the information captured by this database?

The information captured by the database are the following:

  • Region
  • Province
  • Municipality
  • Barangay
  • Number of Household, indicates the actual total number of household in each barangay;
  • Phase
  • Cycle
  • BA information (1st to 5th & special BAs), indicating the date;
    • Number of Household represented, indicates the total household represented and not the total number of attendees;
    • Total number of Attendees
      • Number of Men
      • Number of Women
  • Remarks, indicates whether the barangay assembly was conducted or postponed.
What are the sources of this information?

The information needed for the database are gathered from a Barangay Assembly Form.

Who are involved in updating the database?

The database is updated by CFs, ACs, and Regional M&E Units.

How often is it updated?

The database is updated after the conduct of every BA.; submission of reports and updates to the C.O. is done quarterly.

What are the related databases?

Related to this database is a Consolidated Barangay Profile Database. The same information on the Total Number of Household in each barangay can be found.

What reports can be generated from this database?

Reports that can be generated from this database include, Barangay Assembly participation rate and average participation rate.

National Consolidated Community-Base Evaluation (CBE) Inventory

What is a National Consolidated Community-Base Evaluation Inventory?

It is a database which provides a list of barangays conducting a Community-Base Evaluation.

What are the information captured by this database?

The information captured by the database are the following:

  • Region
  • Municipality
  • Number of Barangays, indicates the actual number of barangays in each municipality;
  • Phase
  • Cycle 1 to 3
    • Number of Barangays conducted, indicates the number of barangays conducting CBE;
    • Submitted to Central Office, indicates the number of barangays who have submitted CBE report/data;
  • Remarks, indicates whether a barangay has already submitted or accomplished a CBE report.
What are the sources of this information?

The information needed for the database are gathered from a CBE form.

Who are involved in updating the database?

The database is updated by CFs, ACs, and Regional M&E Units.

How often is it updated?

The database is updated after the conduct of CBE; submission of reports and updates to the C.O. is done quarterly.

National Consolidated Municipal Profile Database

What is a National Consolidated Municipal Profile Database?

It is a database which provides information on demographic characteristics a Municipality.

What are the information captured by this database?

The information captured by the database are the following:

  • Phase
  • Region
  • Province
  • Municipality
  • District, indicates the district in which the municipality is included;
  • Municipal Class (1st , 2nd, 3rd class, etc)
  • Total number of Barangay, indicates the total number of barangay in each municipality;
  • Total number of Household (based on Regional data)
  • Total number of Household (based on NSO data)
  • Total number of Population
    • Number of Male
    • Number of Female
  • Total number of Population age 15 and above
    • Number of Male
    • Number of Female
What are the sources of this information?

The information needed for the database is gathered from a Municipal SI Form.

Who are involved in updating the database?

The database is updated by ACs and Regional M&E Units.

How often is it updated?

The database is updated after Social Investigation; submission of reports and updates to the C.O. is done quarterly.

National Consolidated Physical Database

What is a National Consolidated Physical Database?

It is a database which provides information on the physical accomplishments, as well as inputs needed for the sub-project implementation.

What are the information captured by this database?

The information captured by the database are the following:

  • Sub-project ID, refer to National Consolidated Physical and Financial Database
  • Phase
  • Cycle
  • Region
  • Province
  • Municipality
  • Barangay
  • Project Title, indicates the title of the sub-project;
  • Sub-project Category, indicates whether the sub-project is for public good, enterprise, or human resource development;
  • Sub-project Classification, classifies the sub-project as for construction, improvement, purchase, rehabilitation, or training;
  • Sub-Project Type, indicates the type of sub-project;
  • Sub-Project Sub-Type, indicates the type of sub-project;
  • Physical Target, indicates the quantity of accomplishments of the sub-project;
  • Target Duration, indicates the target duration for the sub-project implementation;
  • Implementation Mode, indicates whether the implementation mode is Community Force Account (CFA) or Contract;
  • Estimated Total Cost (P) (2nd MIBF), indicates the estimated total cost of the sub-project as approved in the 2nd MIBF;
  • Target Direct Cost, direct cost based on the estimated cost approved in the 2nd MIBF
  • Target Indirect Cost, indirect cost based on the estimated cost approved in the 2nd MIBF;
  • Actual Skilled, actual number of skilled men and women hired in the construction of the sub-project;
  • Actual Unskilled, actual number of unskilled men and women hired in the construction of the sub-project;
  • Target Skilled, the number of skilled men and women that were to be hired in the construction of the sub-project;
  • Target Unskilled, the number of unskilled men and women that were to be hired in the construction of the sub-project.
  • Actual Date Started
  • Actual Date Completed
What are the sources of this information?

The information needed for the database are gathered from Program of Works documents, SP Implementation Forms, Post SP Completion Forms, and reports/data from the Engineering Unit.

Who are involved in updating the database?

The database is updated by Deputy Area Coordinators (DAC), RIE, DRIE, and Regional M&E Units.

How often is it updated?

The database is updated during Sub-project implementation; submission of reports and updates to the C.O. is done quarterly

What are the related databases?

Related databases include Program of Works Database and National Consolidated Physical and Financial Progress, in which the same information on the physical aspect of sub-project implementation can be found.

National Consolidated Community Volunteers Database

=====What is a National Consolidated Community Volunteers Database?

It is a database which provides the list of volunteers in each area and their participation to different activities and trainings conducted.

What are the information captured by this database?

The information captured by the database are the following:

  • Region
  • Province
  • Barangay Information:
    • Municipality
    • Barangay
    • Phase
    • Cycle
  • Volunteers Information:
    • Name
    • Age
    • Gender
    • Sector Represented
    • Attended Participatory Situation Analysis (PSA)
      • Trained (yes or no)
    • Attended Grievance Redress System (GRS)
      • Trained (yes or no)
    • Attended Barangay Representation Team (BRT)
      • Trained (yes or no)
    • Attended Project Preparation Team (PPT)
      • Trained (yes or no)
    • Attended Project Implementation Team (PIT)
      • Trained (yes or no)
    • Attended Monitoring and Inspection Team (MIT)
      • Trained (yes or no)
    • Attended Audit and Inspection Team
      • Trained (yes or no)
    • Attended Other community trainings
      • Trained (yes or no)
What are the sources of this information?

The information needed for the database are gathered from a Barangay Assembly Form, Participatory Analysis Feedback Form, Project Development Workshop Form, and Community Training Form.

Who are involved in updating the database?

The database is updated by CFs, ACs, and Regional M&E Units.

How often is it updated?

The database is updated after the conduct BA and of every trainings and workshops; submission of reports and updates to the C.O. is done quarterly.

What are the related databases?

Related to this database is the National Consolidated Community Trainings Database, in which information on the types of trainings and activities conducted in the community can also be found.

National Consolidated Project Tracking Chart

What is a National Consolidated Project Tracking Chart?

It is a database which monitors the activity or status of the project in each of the 16-Step Community Planning and Barangay Project Cycle.

What are the information captured by this database?

The information captured by the database are the following:

  • Region
  • Province
  • Municipality
    • Phase & Cycle
    • Total Barangays
    • Number of Funded Barangays
    • Total funded sub-projects
    • 16-Step Community Planning and Barangay Project Cycle, indicates the number of accomplished activity in the 16-step process;
    • Remarks, indicates the accomplishments in each area (e.g. 1st Cycle Completed, Conducted 1st BA, and others).
What are the sources of this information?

The information needed for the database are gathered from the Municipal Level Tracking Chart. The same format of database is used by every municipality in tracking the project activity for easier consolidation of reports.

Who are involved in updating the database?

The database is updated by CFs, ACs, RTA and RTC, and Regional M&E Units.

How often is it updated?

The database is updated after the conduct of every activity under the 16-Step Community Planning and Barangay Project Cycle. Submission of reports and updates to the CO is done monthly.

What are the related databases?

Related databases include Consolidated Training Database, specifically information on PSA; Consolidated Physical and Financial Database, information on sub-project implementation, operation and maintenance, number of funded barangays and number of sub-project funded; and Consolidated Municipal Profile Database.



Sparse Text Of M&E Handbook Part 2



National Consolidated Community Empowerment Activity Cycle (CEAC) Tracking Chart

What is a National Consolidated CEAC Tracking Chart?

It is a database which monitors the activity or status of the project in each of the steps in the Community Empowerment Activity Cycle (CEAC).

What are the information captured by this database?

Information captured by the database are the following:

  • Phase
  • Cycle
  • Region
  • Province
  • Municipality
    • Total Barangays
    • Total Number of Funded Barangays
    • Total funded sub-projects
    • CEAC, indicates the status or accomplished activity under the CEAC.
      • Social Preparation Stage
      • Project Identification, Preparation, Selection, and Approval Stage
      • Sub-Project Implementation, ODM for Operation and Maintenance and SPI M&E Monitoring Stage
      • Transition Stage
    • Remarks, indicates the accomplishments in each area.
What are the sources of this information?

The information needed for the database are gathered from the Municipal CEAC Tracking Chart. The same format of database is used by every municipality in tracking the project activity for easier consolidation of reports.

Who are involved in updating the database?

The database is updated by CFs, ACs, RTA and RTC, and Regional M&E Units.

How often is it updated?

The database is updated after the conduct of every activity under Community Empowerment Activity Cycle (CEAC). Submission of reports and updates to the CO is done monthly

What are the related databases?

Related databases include Consolidated Training Database, specifically information on PSA; Consolidated Physical and Financial Database, information on sub-project implementation, operation and maintenance, number of funded barangays and number of sub-project funded; and Consolidated Municipal Profile Database.

REPORTING PROGRESS, RESULTS AND IMPLEMENTATION NEEDS

For updating/on progress.

EXTERNAL MONITORING AND EVALUATION

External monitoring and evaluation is done by individuals and/or organizations that have no direct interest or involvement in the project. External M&E includes external impact evaluation and independent monitoring by NGOs.

Impact Evaluation

The KALAHI-CIDSS impact evaluation consists of a baseline study, mid-term and final evaluation studies.

Baseline Study

The purpose of the baseline study is to identify the prevailing socio-economic, governance and empowerment conditions in a sample of both KALAHI-CIDSS-CIDSS and non-KALAHI-CIDSS barangays before the start of project implementation. This set of information is intended for comparison during a mid-term evaluation and end-of-project evaluation to determine if project interventions rather than other non-project variables occurring simultaneously were a significant factor in any observed changes in the KALAHI-CIDSS:KKB communities.

The baseline is conducted at the start of operations in sample areas and will collect information in both project and non-project areas.

The household surveys include indicators on empowerment, governance and the poverty situation in selected barangays. It will also gather information on indicators which have relatively high poverty co-relates such as the socio-cultural characteristics of respondents, condition and ownership status of respondent’s housing units and sanitation facilities, type and nature of utilities available/accessible to the household, school participation rate at different school levels, livelihood and income generation including off farm employment and income, agricultural production, land tenure, use of inputs and other information related to farming activities of households, fishing activities, access and utilization of credit, other household assets, health status and access to facilities, knowledge, aptitude and perception on selected issues related to empowerment, governance and the poverty situation of the respondent.

Community surveys will collect data on existing health, education livelihood and other facilities and infrastructure in the community.

Mid-Term Evaluation

A mid-term evaluation will be conducted to assess the potential impact of project and sub-project activities. It will identify actual and potential changes in the baseline information that may be attributed to project interventions. This evaluation will be conducted in both project and non-project areas where baseline information was gathered.

The process involves the following procedure:

  • Definition of the Terms of Reference for the mid-term evaluation
  • Organizing of a multi-stakeholder Evaluation Steering Committee
  • Identification and contracting of the external evaluator
  • Preparation of evaluation work plan
  • Review and approval by Steering Committee of evaluation work plan
  • Participatory conduct of the evaluation: data gathering, analysis and conclusions with respect to the actual vs., planned results of the project, determination of over-all project
  • Preparation, submission of evaluation report for comments
  • Finalization of evaluation study
  • Feedback of recommendations and lessons learned to Evaluation Steering Committee
  • Identify TORs for End of Project Evaluation

The Mid-Term Evaluation Report will include conclusions on:

  • Planned vs. actual results for each major output identified in the LFA
  • Reasons and factors explaining any observed variances
  • Conclusions with respect to continued relevance, appropriateness and cost-effectiveness of project strategies and plans
  • Review, explanation and conclusions on unintended results, assumptions, risks
  • Recommendations on how to address identified variances
  • Recommendations related to review of LFA including budget implications
  • Recommendations on how to enhance impact and sustainability of benefits
End-of-Project Impact Evaluation

An end-of-project evaluation will identify changes in socio-economic situation of communities based on baseline and mid-term evaluation information. At the same time it will establish the significance of project interventions in influencing changes in the situation of communities and households.

As with the mid-term evaluation, this evaluation will be conducted in both project and non-project areas where baseline information was gathered. A comparison of significant differences in changes in the selected development indicators will be used to determine the significance of project interventions in improving the lives of project beneficiaries.

The process involves the following procedure:

  • Definition of the Terms of Reference for the end-of-project evaluation
  • Organizing of a multi-stakeholder Evaluation Steering Committee
  • Identification and contracting of the external evaluator
  • Preparation of evaluation work plan
  • Review and approval by Evaluation Steering Committee of evaluation work plan
  • Participatory conduct of the evaluation: data gathering, analysis and conclusions with respect to the actual vs., planned results of the project, determination of over-all project
  • Preparation, submission of evaluation report for comments
  • Finalization of evaluation study
  • Feedback of recommendations and lessons learned to Evaluation Steering Committee.

The Final Evaluation Report will include conclusions on whether:

  • Goal is being achieved and extent of project impact and what factors have influenced this result
  • Purpose has been achieved and what factors have influenced this result
  • Outputs have been accomplished and what factors have influenced these results
  • Quantity, quality, effectiveness and efficiency criteria have been met
  • Examples or cases of exemplary practices, models or strategies exist which can highlight lessons learned
B. NGO monitoring

The independent stakeholder monitoring system is the process by which key local stakeholders, namely NGO representatives, observe, assess and report on the results of KALAHI-CIDSS project implementation particularly at the community and inter-barangay forum levels.

The process is meant to promote transparency, accountability and co-responsibility among stakeholders for the poverty reduction goals of the KALAHI-CIDSS project. It involves independent conduct of the monitoring activity, report preparation and presentation and discussion of reports in a multi-stakeholder forum.

The Regional Project Management Team is primarily responsible for establishing working arrangements and monitoring mechanisms engaging the NGOs.

KALAHI-CIDSS shall consolidate and integrate the different independent assessments and present the results in terms of areas of consensus and divergence, reasons for the findings and recommendations on how to improve project implementation and promote greater stakeholder collaboration.



Sparse Text of Annexes



RM&E FORMS

Barangay Social Investigation Form Region: Province: Municipality: Barangay:

IDENTIFICATION AND OTHER INFORMATION

Region: ______________________________ Province: ______________________________ Municipality:______________________________ Barangay: ______________________________

Is this a Poblacion Barangay? _______________

What is the geographic characteristic of the Barangay? (i.e upland, lowland, island, coastal)? ______________________


Key Persons in the Barangay:

            Name                    Designation

Members of the BC: Members of the BDC (if any):

Names of HH Head (At least 25% of HH Population):


POPULATION PROFILE

1. Total Number of households in the barangay 2. Total Number of people in the barangay: 3. No. of Men (18 years old - up) 4. No. of Women (18 years old- up) 5. No. of Children (Below 18 years old) 6. No. of Children ages 0-5 years old 7. No. of elementary school aged children (children 6-12 years old) 8. No. of secondary school aged children (children 13-16 years old) 9. Year last population census conducted 10. Total Voting Population: 11. Total Women Voting Population 12. Total Men Voting Population 13. Total Number of Labor Force (15 to 64 years old who are actively seeking work) 14. Are there indigenous people (IP) in your barangay?

                  (1) Yes        (2) None                 

If yes, to what group do they belong? _____________________________________ How many families are they?

15. Can you identify community activities that people participate in? Activity Month Conducted

PRESENCE/ ACCESS TO FACILITIES

1. Road Network a. What types of road traverse through the barangay? What proportion of the roads are (type)? (specify % distribution)

Please check Types of Road % Dirt Gravel Asphalted Cemented/All Weather Road

2. Establishments a. What establishments are in your barangay? If there is none, how far is your barangay to the nearest establishment? Please indicate if it is in minutes or kms. Establishment Please check If none, distance to nearest facility Mode of Transport Town or Provincial Hall Church Plaza Cemetery Market place Elementary School Secondary School College or university Public Library Hospital Health Center Housing Projects Telecommunication Access Postal Service Waterworks System Stores Financing Institution Post Harvest Facilities


PRESENCE OF ORGANIZED SECTOR

1. Are there people’s organizations present in the barangay? 2. What are these? 3. When were they established? 4. What are their primary functions? 5. How many are their members? 6. Is membership exclusive? If yes, for which groups?

Community Organizations When established Primary functions How many members Exclusive for whom

DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES

1. Over the past year, what development project/s has/have been implemented in your barangay? 2. How much did the project/s cost? 3. Where did the funds come from? 4. How much was financed by the barangay? 5. Who decided on the choice of the project/s? How? 6. When was this project first proposed? (Specify the year) 7. When was the project/s approved? (Specify the year) 8. When was the project/s completed?

Development projects Cost of project Source of funds Cost Sharing (%) Decision Mechanism When proposed When approved When Completed

ACCESS TO SERVICES

1. Which of the following do you think are the main problems of your barangay? Select the top three (3). Please check box.

Check if mentioned Problems Are these Problems being addressed properly?

1 YES 2 No

ENTER Kindly explain your answer

Access/ Mobility


Water and Sanitation

Lack of Employment opportunities


Illiteracy/increasing number of out-of-school youth


Lack of Power Supply


Health and Nutrition


Peace and Order

Lack of service facilities (i.e. post harvest)


Others, specify

2. Over the past six months, how many times did the following personnel visit your barangay either to consult with the community or provide services?


Government Official Number of visits Mayor/vice mayor/councilor Municipal planning officer Municipal agrarian reform officer Municipal social worker Agriculture extension worker

Government doctor / Municipal health officer Government midwife


BARANGAY GOVERNANCE

1. How much was your IRA the past year? ________________

2. What other sources of funds does your barangay have?

3. How do you disseminate the information on the financial situation of the barangay to the residents of your barangay? How often is the reporting done?

4. Is there a Barangay Development Council?

5. During the past year, how many times did the BDC meet? _________

6. During the past year, what activities did the BDC undertake?

Activity 1 2 3 4


7. During the past year, how many times were the BAs conducted?

8. On the average, how many barangay residents are present during the meetings?


POVERTY PROFILE

Health 1. Proportion of children aged 0-5 years old who died to the sum of children aged 0 -5 years old during the previous year: (a/b) a) Number of children aged 0-5 years old who died b) Number of children aged 0 -5 years old

2. Proportion of women who died due to pregnancy-related causes (a/b) a) Number of pregnant women who died due to pregnancy-related causes b) Number of pregnant women

Nutrition 3. Proportion of children aged 0-5 years old who are malnourished to the total number of children 0- 5 years old (a/b) a) Number of children aged 0-5 years old who are malnourished b) Number of children aged 0 -5 years old

Access to Basic Amenities 4. Proportion of households with access to safe water (a/b) a) Number of households b) Number of households with access to potable water (within 250m)

5. Proportion of households with access to sanitary toilet facilities (a/b)


a) Number of households b) Number of households with access to sanitary toilet facilities

Shelter 6. Proportion of households who are squatting (a/b) a) Number of households b) Number of households who are squatting

7. Proportion of households living in makeshift housing (a/b) a) Number of households b) Number of households living in makeshift housing

Peace and Order 8. Proportion of households with members victimized by crimes (a/b) a) Number of households b) Number of households members victimized by crimes

Income 9. Proportion of households with income less than the poverty threshold (a/b) a) Number of households b) Number of households with income less than the poverty threshold

10. Proportion of households with income less than the food threshold (a/b) a) Number of households b) Number of households with income less than the food threshold

11. Proportion of households who eat less than three (3) meals a day (a/b) a) Number of households


b) Number of households who eat less than three (3) meals a day


Basic Education 12. Proportion of 6-12 years old children who are not in elementary school (a/b) a) Number of children 6-12 years old who are not in elementary school b) Number of children 6-12 years old


13. Proportion of 13-16 years old children who are not in secondary school (a/b) a) Number of children 13-16 years old who are not in secondary school b) Number of children 13-16 years old


Employment 14. Proportion of the members of the labor force (persons aged 15 years and above who are actively seeking work) who are not working (a/b) a) Number of labor force who are not working b) Number of labor force


Attachments: a. Barangay Appropriations Report b. Barangay Development Plan/Annual investment Plan (if available) c. Sources of data

Municipal Social Investigation Form Province: Municipality: Area Coordinator:


IDENTIFICATION AND OTHER INFORMATION

Region: Province: Municipality:

What is the geographic characteristic of the Municipality? (i.e upland, lowland, island, coastal)? ______________________


Key Persons in the Municipality:

            Name                    Designation

Members of the MLGU: Members of the MIAC (if any):

Members of the MDC (Non-Barangay Captains Only):


POPULATION PROFILE

16. Total Number of households in the municipality 17. Total Number of people in the municipality: 18. No. of Men (18 years old - up) 19. No. of Women (18 years old- up) 20. No. of Children (Below 18 years old) 21. No. of Children ages 0-5 years old 22. No. of elementary school aged children (children 6-12 years old) 23. No. of secondary school aged children (children 13-16 years old) 24. Year last population census conducted 25. Total Voting Population: 26. Total Women Voting Population 27. Total Men Voting Population 28. Total Number of Labor Force (15 to 64 years old who are actively seeking work) 29. Are there indigenous people (IP) in your municipality?

                  (1) Yes        (2) None                 

If yes, to what group do they belong? How many families are they? Municipal Social Investigation Form Province: Municipality: Area Coordinator: Municipal Social Investigation Form Province: Municipality: Area Coordinator:


PRESENCE/ ACCESS TO FACILITIES

1. Road Network b. What types of road traverse through the municipality? What proportion of the roads are (type)? (specify % distribution)


Please check Types of Road % Dirt Gravel Asphalted Cemented/All Weather Road


2. Establishments b. What establishments are in your municipality? If there is none, how far is your municipality to the nearest establishment? Please indicate if it is in minutes or kms. Establishment Please check If none, distance to nearest facility Mode of Transport Town or Provincial Hall Church Plaza Cemetery Market place Elementary School Secondary School College or university Public Library Hospital Health Center Housing Projects Telecommunication Access Postal Service Waterworks System Stores Financing Institution Post Harvest Facilities

PRESENCE OF ORGANIZED SECTOR

7. Are there people’s organizations present in the municipality? 8. What are these? Municipal Social Investigation Form Province: Municipality: Area Coordinator:

9. When were they established? 10. What are their primary functions? 11. How many are their members? 12. Is membership exclusive? If yes, for which groups?

Community Organizations When established Primary functions How many members Exclusive for whom


DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES

1. Over the past year, what development project/s has/have been implemented in your municipality? 2. How much did the project/s cost? 3. Where did the funds come from? 4. How much was financed by the municipality? 5. Who decided on the choice of the project/s? How? 6. When was this project first proposed? (Specify the year) 7. When was the project/s approved? (Specify the year) 8. When was the project/s completed?


Municipal Social Investigation Form Province: Municipality: Area Coordinator:

Development projects Barangay Location Cost of project Source of funds Cost Sharing (%) When proposed When approved When Completed


ACCESS TO SERVICES

3. Which of the following do you think are the main problems of your municipality? Select the top three (3). Please check box.

Check if mentioned Problems Are these Problems being addressed properly?

3 YES 4 No

ENTER Kindly explain your answer

Access/ Mobility

Water and Sanitation

Lack of Employment opportunities


Municipal Social Investigation Form Province: Municipality: Area Coordinator:


Illiteracy/increasing number of out-of-school youth

Lack of Power Supply

Health and Nutrition

Peace and Order

Lack of service facilities (i.e. post harvest)

Others, specify

MUNICIPAL GOVERNANCE

9. How much was the IRA the past year?

10. What other sources of funds does the municipality have?

11. How does the municipality disseminate the information on the financial situation of the municipality to the barangays? How often is the reporting done?

12. Is there a Municipal Development Council?

13. During the past year, how many times did the MDC meet?

14. Are there NGO/PO Representatives in the MDC? How were the MDC NGO/PO representatives selected?

15. During the past year, how many times did the MDC meet? ________

16. How many, on the average, attended the MDC meeting? ________

17. Who are the regular attendees of the MDC meeting?


POVERTY PROFILE

Health 14. Proportion of children aged 0-5 years old who died to the sum of children aged 0 -5 years old during the previous year: (a/b) a) Number of children aged 0-5 years old who died b) Number of children aged 0 -5 years old

15. Proportion of women who died due to pregnancy-related causes (a/b) a) Number of pregnant women who died due to pregnancy-related causes b) Number of pregnant women

Municipal Social Investigation Form Province: Municipality: Area Coordinator:

Nutrition 16. Proportion of children aged 0-5 years old who are malnourished to the total number of children 0- 5 years old (a/b) a) Number of children aged 0-5 years old who are malnourished b) Number of children aged 0 -5 years old

Access to Basic Amenities 17. Proportion of households with access to safe water (a/b) a) Number of households b) Number of households with access to potable water (within 250m)

18. Proportion of households with access to sanitary toilet facilities (a/b) a) Number of households b) Number of households with access to sanitary toilet facilities

Shelter 19. Proportion of households who are squatting (a/b) a) Number of households b) Number of households who are squatting


20. Proportion of households living in makeshift housing (a/b) a) Number of households b) Number of households living in makeshift housing

Peace and Order 21. Proportion of households with members victimized by crimes (a/b) a) Number of households b) Number of households members victimized by crimes

Income 22. Proportion of households with income less than the poverty threshold (a/b) c) Number of households d) Number of households with income less than the poverty threshold

23. Proportion of households with income less than the food threshold (a/b) c) Number of households d) Number of households with income less than the food threshold

24. Proportion of households who eat less than three (3) meals a day (a/b) c) Number of households d) Number of households who eat less than three (3) meals a day


Basic Education 25. Proportion of 6-12 years old children who are not in elementary school (a/b) a) Number of children 6-12 years old who are not in elementary school b) Number of children 6-12 years old


26. Proportion of 13-16 years old children who are not in secondary school (a/b) a) Number of children 13-16 years old who are not in secondary school b) Number of children 13-16 years old

Municipal Social Investigation Form Province: Municipality: Area Coordinator:


Employment 15. Proportion of the members of the labor force (persons aged 15 years and above who are actively seeking work) who are not working (a/b) c) Number of labor force who are not working d) Number of labor force


Attachments: a. Municipal Appropriations Report b. Municipal Development Plan/Annual investment Plan c. Comprehensive Land Use Plan (if available) d. MBN/CBMS Results Barangay Assembly Form Province: Municipality: Barangay: Reported by:


1. Barangay Assembly Profile: Cycle: Date and Time conducted: No. of HH represented: No. of Men Attended: No. of Women Attended: Facilitator: (Name & Designation) Duration:

2. What were the objectives of the BA?

3. What were the key points discussed?

4. What did you observe regarding the conduct of the BA?

5. What did you observe regarding the participation of the BA members? (Please indicate behaviors and attitudes of participants)

6. What could be improved about the way the BA was conducted?


Attachments: (To be neatly filed in the ACT office) • Attendance sheets • Agenda • Minutes


Participatory Situational Analysis Form Region: Province: Municipality: Barangay:

1. Participatory Situational Analysis Profile: Cycle: Facilitated by: Date conducted: No. of Men Attended: No. of Women Attended: Duration:

2. What were the priority problems and proposed solutions? How do these differ from those identified in the social investigation or previous cycle?

3. What were the objectives of the PSA?

4. What were the key points discussed during the meeting?

5. What did you observe regarding the conduct of the PSA?

6. What did you observe regarding the participation of the PSA volunteers? (Please indicate behaviors and attitudes of participants)

7. What tools were used in the conduct of the PSA?

8. What could be improved about the way the PSA was conducted?


Attachments: • Barangay Action Plans • Accomplished PSA Tools • Attendance sheets

Project Development Workshop Form Region: Province: Municipality: Barangay: Cycle: Report By: (Name & Designation)


1. Briefly discuss the community’s identified problems and the range of possible solutions to each problem. The discussion should also include how the solutions will address each problem.


2. Which problem did the community choose to address? Which solution will they further develop into a community project?

3. What difficulties were encountered by the community during project development? What did the community find easy during project development?

4. What difficulties were encountered by the LGU during project development? What did the LGU find easy during project development?

5. How did the community participate in the project development process? Were there some members of the community who are more involved than others? Who were these? How?

6. How did the LGU participate in the project development process? Were there some members of the LGU who are more involved than others? Who were these? How?

7. How can we improve the project development process to enhance community and LGU participation?

Attachments Required: 1. Sub-project Proposal


Community Training Form Region: Province: Municipality: Barangay: Report By: (Name & Designation) Date Accomplished:


1. Training Information

Name of Training: Date Conducted: No. of Male Participants: No. of Female Participants: Other Barangays present during the training: Duration: Resource Person and Topic Discussed:


Name of Resource Person Designation Topic/s Discussed


Educational Attainment of the Participants per Barangay

None Some Elem. Elem. Grad Some HS HS Grad College Voc Others Male Female


2. Actual Cost of Training by Source

Source Community BLGU MLGU KC Others

Total Training Cost:

3. What are the expected outputs of the training?

4. What are the objectives of the training?

Community Training Form Region: Province: Municipality: Barangay: Report By: (Name & Designation) Date Accomplished:


5. Training Results

a. Reaction J K L Content M

      F         

Materials M

      F         

Resource Person M

      F         

Venue M

      F         

Schedule M

     F          

b. Pre- and Post-Test Results (if applicable)

Pre-Test Post-Test Gain (Loss) Objective 1 M

      F         

Objective 2 M

      F         

Objective 3 M

      F         

Objective 4 M

      F         

Objective 5 M

     F          

6. How would you rate the community volunteers’ outputs? Please explain and include comments as a result of the review of these outputs. (i.e. If output of training is a P.O.W, what are the results of the review of these plans)

7. Based on the review of the outputs, what areas still need technical assistance?


8. How can we improve the conduct of trainings?

Sub-Project Implementation Form Region: Province: Municipality: Barangay: SP Type: Cycle: Report By: (Name & Designation)

1. SP Information

Sub-Project Title:

Sub-Project Description: (Please include physical targets)

Target Duration of Implementation:

Brief description of target beneficiaries (please specify number and sector of people, who will benefit from the project)

Estimated Total Project Cost:

Proposed Project Budget:

KC Grants Community BLGU MLGU PLGU Others Total Cash Kind

Operation and Management Schemes: (please explain in detail how the community plans to operate and manage the project specifying existing resources and target fund source to sustain these activities)

2. Procurement Information

Mode of Procurement:


• What difficulties were encountered by the community during procurement? Were there any issues arising from procurement activities? If yes, what were these and what steps were taken to address these?


• How would you assess the community’s participation in and appreciation of the procurement process?


• How can the procurement process be better facilitated to enhance community and LGU participation?

3. Physical Project Progress

Start Date:

Month Accomplishment for the Month Cumulative Accomplishment as of the Month Description of Accomplishment for the Month

Sub-Project Implementation Form Region: Province: Municipality: Barangay: SP Type: Cycle: Report By: (Name & Designation)


• Are there any variations from the original (pre-SP Implementation) design? If yes, what are these? Why did these design changes come about?

• Is implementation for the month as scheduled? Why or Why not?


4. Financial Progress

KC Grant Fund Request Status: Month Amount Requested Date Requested Date Downloaded

• Is there cost over/under run? If yes, how much were these and why? Could these variations from the planned cost have been avoided? Why or why not?


LCC Delivery Status: Date Community BLGU MLGU PLGU

• Did the community deliver the LCC as committed? What were facilitating/hindering factors for delivery as committed?


• Did the BLGU deliver the LCC as committed? What were facilitating/hindering factors for delivery as committed?


• Did the MLGU deliver the LCC as committed? What were facilitating/hindering factors for delivery as committed?

• Did the PLGU deliver the LCC as committed? What were facilitating/hindering factors for delivery as committed?

Fund Utilization Status: Month Amount Utilized for the Month (Grant) Amount Utilized for the Month (LCC) Total Amount Utilized for the Month

Sub-Project Implementation Form Region: Province: Municipality: Barangay: SP Type: Cycle: Report By: (Name & Designation)


1. Community Participation in Sub-project implementation


a. How did the community participate in SP Implementation? What difficulties were encountered by the community during SP implementation? Were there any issues arising from SP Implementation? If yes, what were these and what steps were taken to address these?

b. What difficulties were encountered by the BSPMC during SP implementation? What did they like best about the SP implementation process?

c. How can community participation in SP Implementation be improved? What are the facilitating and/or hindering factors that affected community participation?


Male and Female Contribution to SP Implementation

Month Total No. of Male Volunteers Involved in SPI Total No. of Hours Worked (Male) Total No. of Female Volunteers Involved in SPI Total No. of Hours Worked (Female)

Grand Total


2. LGU Participation in Sub-Project Implementation

a. How did the LGU participate in SP Implementation?

b. What difficulties did they encounter during SP implementation? Were there any issues with the LGU arising from SP Implementation? If yes, what were these and what steps were taken to address these?

c. What did they like best about the SP implementation process?

d. How can LGU participation in SP Implementation be improved? What are the facilitating and/or hindering factors that affected LGU participation?


3. Transparency Mechanisms in Sub-project implementation

• What transparency mechanisms were in place during the project?


• What role did the community have in ensuring that the SPI is a transparent process?

Sub-Project Implementation Form Region: Province: Municipality: Barangay: SP Type: Cycle: Report By: (Name & Designation)


• What role did the LGU have in ensuring that the SPI is a transparent process?


4. Project Completion Details

Date Completed: Inauguration Date: Actual Duration of Implementation: (Start date is one month after the MIBF) Actual Total Project Cost: Cost Breakdown by Source:

KC Grants Community BLGU MLGU PLGU Others Total Cash Kind


Sub-Project Description: (Describe the project as built)


Attachments Required: 2. Program of Works 3. Sub-project Concept Form 4. Work Schedule and Physical Progress Report

Post Sub-Project Completion Form Region: Province: Municipality: Barangay: SP ID: SP Type: Report By: (Name & Designation) Date Accomplished:


A. Sub-Project Information Sub-Project Title: Sub-Project Description: Cost: Date Completed: Date Inaugurated:

B. Operations and Maintenance Schemes • What O&M schemes are in place? Briefly describe these. • Is the O&M plan fully implemented? If no, what aspects of the plan are not implemented and why? • Briefly describe the cash flow of the sub-project. What is the major source of funds? What is the major use of O&M funds?


C. Community Participation in O&M • In the past 6 months, what O&M activities did the community undertake? Who were involved in these activities? Briefly discuss their involvement.


D. LGU Participation in O&M • In the past 6 months, what O&M activities did the LGU undertake? Who were involved in these activities? Briefly discuss their involvement. • Did the LGU allocate funds for O&M of SPs? If no, why not? If yes, did the LGU deliver the funds as committed? If no, why not? • Is there a legislation supporting SP O&M? If yes, briefly describe it.

E. Transparency Mechanisms in O&M • How does the O&M group inform the other members of the community of the physical status of the project? • How does the O&M group inform the other members of the community of the financial status of the project?

F. Physical Monitoring Results • Is the sub-project well maintained? Briefly discuss the findings of the inspectorate team. • Is the sub-project consistently maintained as evidenced by satisfactory findings by the inspectorate team? Support your answer.

G. SP Benefits • Fill out the appropriate SP benefit matrix. (See separate sheet) • Are the experienced benefits sustained? Why or why not? • What factors contributed to the answer in the preceding question? What were the hindering factors? • How has the project solved the problem addressed? Support your answer. (Please refer to the PDW results)

Attachments: 1. SP Evaluation Results

Community-Based Evaluation Form Region: Province: Municipality: Barangay: Report By: (Name & Designation) Date Accomplished:


1. Community-Based Evaluation Profile Cycle: Facilitated by: Date conducted: No. of Men Attended: No. of Women Attended: Duration:

2. Barangay Background

• Briefly describe the previous state of poverty, empowerment and local governance in the in the barangay • Briefly describe the major activities undertaken and Project-related events on a timeline

3. Discuss the major changes identified by the community by category and domain. For each major domain, the following information should be reported: - A description of the process of change, including cause and effect diagrams. - Estimates of the numbers of people affected by the changes. - The relative significance of each change to the community and individuals. - A network diagram showing the linkages between major domains of change.


4. How did the participants participate in the CBE?


5. What difficulties were encountered in the conduct of the CBE? Have these affected the quality of the CBE outputs?

6. How could the conduct of the CBE be improved?


Attachments: • CBE Matrices

Annex 2 National Consolidated Physical and Financial Database


Sub-Project ID Sub-Project Type Phase Cycle Region Municipality Barangay Project Name Estimated Total Cost (P) 2nd MIBF KALAHI GRANT Community & LGU Counterpart Commitments (LCC) Grant Funds Released


Note: Continuation of the table above.

Tranches LCC Delivered Total Utilized Grant Funds Utilized LCC Utilized % Utilized from Grant released* % LCC utilized over delivered % LCC delivered over committed % Financial Accomplishment (Grant + LCC) % Physical Progress as of January 2007

Note: Continuation of the table above 1st MIBF Date 2nd MIBF Date Start Date (SPI) Completion Date Inauguration Date No. of Direct Beneficiaries Remarks # of Brgys # of SPs


Region Phase Province Municipality Total # of Brgys Cycle 1 to 3 1st MIBF 2nd MIBF Date # of Brgys Attended # of Men Attended # of Women Attended Date # of Brgys Attended # of Men Attended # of Women Attended


Municipal Inter-Barangay Forum Database (16-Steps)

National Consolidated Barangay Profile Database


Note: Continuation of the table above Phase Region Province Municipality Barangay Poblacion Brgy # of Sitio/Purok Total # HH Total # of Population # Men # Women # Children Total

Total # of Voting Population Terrain IP Areas (Y or N)

# Men Voting     # Women Voting      Total      
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 


National Consolidated Community Training Database

Barangay Information Region Municipality Barangay Phase Cycle


Note: Continuation of the table above Sources of Funds Date Conducted Type of Training Total of Male Total of Female Funds from MLGU Funds from BLGU Funds from Community Funds from Other Source

National Consolidated Non-Prioritized Barangay Database

Non-Prioritized Barangay Information Region Province Municipality Barangay Phase Cycle Proposed SP Total Project Cost Requested KC Grant Amount LCC Total Number of Direct Beneficiaries Total Number of Actual Beneficiaries


Note: Continuation of the table above Resource Generation Results Remarks Funded/ Unfunded Source of Fund Amount Funded Date Funded Status of SP Physical Accomplishment Date Started Date Completed


National Consolidated Barangay Assembly Database

Region Province Municipality Barangay Total # HH Phase Cycle 1st to 5th BA Information Date Conducted Total # of Attendees # HH represented # Men # Women Total Attendees

National Consolidated Community-Base Evaluation Database


Region Municipality No. of Brgys Phase Cycle 1 Cycle 2 Cycle 3 Remarks # Brgys conducted Submitted to CO # Brgys conducted Submitted to CO # Brgys conducted Submitted to CO


National Consolidated Municipal Profile Database

Region Province Municipality District Mun. Class Total # Brgy Total # HH (Based on Regional Data) Total # HH (Based on NSO Data)


Note: Continuation of the table above. Total # Population Total Population age 15 above

  1. Male # Female Total # Male # Female Total

National Consolidated Physical Database Sub-Project ID Phase Cycle Region Province Municipality Barangay Project Title Sub-project Category Sub-project Classification Sub-Project Type Sub-Project Sub-Type

Note: Continuation of the table above. Physical Target Actual Physical Accomplishment Target Duration Actual Duration Implementation Mode Estimated Total Cost (P) (2nd MIBF) Target Direct Cost Target Indirect Cost

Quantity    Unit     Quantity   Unit    Calendar Days   Calendar Days            Total   Total 
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     

Note: Continuation of the table above. Actual Skilled Actual Unskilled Target Skilled Target Unskilled Actual Date Started Actual Date Completed

  1. Men # Women # Men # Women # Men # Women # Men # Women

National Consolidated Community Volunteers Database

Barangay Information

Region Province Municipality Barangay Phase Cycle


Note: Continuation of the table above.

                Volunteers Information                   

Name Age Gender Sector Represented PSA Trained GRS Trained BRT Trained


Note: Continuation of the table above.

                    Volunteers Information               

PPT Trained PIT Trained MIT Trained AIT Trained Others Trained

National Consolidated Project Cycle Tracking Chart

REGION PROVINCE MUN. PHASE & CYCLE TOTAL BRGYS # of Funded Brgys TOTAL FUNDED SPs


Note: Continuation of the table above. 16-Steps Community Planning and Barangay Project Cycle Social Preparation Project Identification Project Selection/Prioritization MPO 1st BA PSA 2nd BA CS SPC Prep 3rd BA Fin SPC 1st MIBF 4th BA DSP 5th BA 2nd MIBF f 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13


Note: Continuation of the table above. 16-Steps Remarks Project Implementation Pre I/CW SPI O&M 14 15 16


National Consolidated Community Empowerment Activity Cycle (CEAC) Tracking Chart

Phase Cycle Region Province Municipality Total # of Brgys. Total # of Funded Brgys Total # of Funded SPs

Note: Continuation of the table above. Social Preparation Stage Project Identification, Preparation, Selection, and Approval Stage Cycle 1, 2 & 3 Cycle 2 Optional Cycle 2&3 Municipal Orientation Barangay Orientation (1st BA) PSA 2nd BA MIBF for Criteria Setting PDW Preparation and Finalization of detailed Proposal BDC BDP Preparation Community Consultation (3rd BA) MIAC Technical Review

Note: Continuation of the table above.

Cycle 1&2 Cycle 3 Cycle 1, 2 & 3 Optional Cycle 2&3 Optional MIBF for PDPRA Expanded MDC SP Prioritization and Approval Community Consulation (4th BA) Approval of SP Proposal (MIBF-EC) MDC Meeting (SP Support; MDP Preparation) Community Consultation (5th BA)

Note: Continuation of the table above. SPI, ODM for O&M and SPI M&E Monitoring Stage Transition Stage Cycle 1, 2 & 3 Cycle 2 Pre-Implementation Workshop MIAC Monitoring and Technical Support Implementation of SP and SPI M&E O&M Plan Implementation Community-Based Evaluation Accountability Reporting Municipal Post-KC Transition Planning


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