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Killer cell lectin-like receptor subfamily C, member 2
Identifiers
Symbols KLRC2; CD159c; MGC138244; NKG2-C; NKG2C
External IDs OMIM602891 GeneCards: KLRC2 Gene
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE KLRC2 206785 s at tn.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez 3822 n/a
Ensembl ENSG00000205809 n/a
UniProt P26717 n/a
RefSeq (mRNA) NM_002260 n/a
RefSeq (protein) NP_002251 n/a
Location (UCSC) Chr 12:
10.47 - 10.48 Mb
n/a
PubMed search [1] n/a

NKG2-C type II integral membrane protein is a protein that in humans is encoded by the KLRC2 gene.[1][2]

Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes that can mediate lysis of certain tumor cells and virus-infected cells without previous activation. They can also regulate specific humoral and cell-mediated immunity. NK cells preferentially express several calcium-dependent (C-type) lectins, which have been implicated in the regulation of NK cell function. The group, designated KLRC (NKG2) are expressed primarily in natural killer (NK) cells and encodes a family of transmembrane proteins characterized by a type II membrane orientation (extracellular C terminus) and the presence of a C-type lectin domain. The KLRC (NKG2) gene family is located within the NK complex, a region that contains several C-type lectin genes preferentially expressed on NK cells. KLRC2 alternative splice variants have been described but their full-length nature has not been determined.[2]

Contents

Interactions

KLRC2 has been shown to interact with KLRD1.[3][4]

See also

References

  1. ^ Plougastel B, Trowsdale J (Aug 1998). "Sequence analysis of a 62-kb region overlapping the human KLRC cluster of genes". Genomics 49 (2): 193–9. doi:10.1006/geno.1997.5197. PMID 9598306.  
  2. ^ a b "Entrez Gene: KLRC2 killer cell lectin-like receptor subfamily C, member 2". http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=gene&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=3822.  
  3. ^ Lazetic, S; Chang C, Houchins J P, Lanier L L, Phillips J H (Dec. 1996). "Human natural killer cell receptors involved in MHC class I recognition are disulfide-linked heterodimers of CD94 and NKG2 subunits". J. Immunol. (UNITED STATES) 157 (11): 4741–5. ISSN 0022-1767. PMID 8943374.  
  4. ^ Ding, Y; Sumitran S, Holgersson J (May. 1999). "Direct binding of purified HLA class I antigens by soluble NKG2/CD94 C-type lectins from natural killer cells". Scand. J. Immunol. (ENGLAND) 49 (5): 459–65. ISSN 0300-9475. PMID 10320637.  

Further reading

  • Houchins JP, Yabe T, McSherry C, Bach FH (1991). "DNA sequence analysis of NKG2, a family of related cDNA clones encoding type II integral membrane proteins on human natural killer cells.". J. Exp. Med. 173 (4): 1017–20. doi:10.1084/jem.173.4.1017. PMID 2007850.  
  • Yabe T, McSherry C, Bach FH, et al. (1993). "A multigene family on human chromosome 12 encodes natural killer-cell lectins.". Immunogenetics 37 (6): 455–60. doi:10.1007/BF00222470. PMID 8436421.  
  • Houchins JP, Lanier LL, Niemi EC, et al. (1997). "Natural killer cell cytolytic activity is inhibited by NKG2-A and activated by NKG2-C.". J. Immunol. 158 (8): 3603–9. PMID 9103421.  
  • Braud VM, Allan DS, O'Callaghan CA, et al. (1998). "HLA-E binds to natural killer cell receptors CD94/NKG2A, B and C.". Nature 391 (6669): 795–9. doi:10.1038/35869. PMID 9486650.  
  • Lanier LL, Corliss B, Wu J, Phillips JH (1998). "Association of DAP12 with activating CD94/NKG2C NK cell receptors.". Immunity 8 (6): 693–701. doi:10.1016/S1074-7613(00)80574-9. PMID 9655483.  
  • Glienke J, Sobanov Y, Brostjan C, et al. (1998). "The genomic organization of NKG2C, E, F, and D receptor genes in the human natural killer gene complex.". Immunogenetics 48 (3): 163–73. doi:10.1007/s002510050420. PMID 9683661.  
  • Ding Y, Sumitran S, Holgersson J (1999). "Direct binding of purified HLA class I antigens by soluble NKG2/CD94 C-type lectins from natural killer cells.". Scand. J. Immunol. 49 (5): 459–65. doi:10.1046/j.1365-3083.1999.00566.x. PMID 10320637.  
  • Khakoo SI, Rajalingam R, Shum BP, et al. (2000). "Rapid evolution of NK cell receptor systems demonstrated by comparison of chimpanzees and humans.". Immunity 12 (6): 687–98. doi:10.1016/S1074-7613(00)80219-8. PMID 10894168.  
  • Shum BP, Flodin LR, Muir DG, et al. (2002). "Conservation and variation in human and common chimpanzee CD94 and NKG2 genes.". J. Immunol. 168 (1): 240–52. PMID 11751968.  
  • Strausberg RL, Feingold EA, Grouse LH, et al. (2003). "Generation and initial analysis of more than 15,000 full-length human and mouse cDNA sequences.". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99 (26): 16899–903. doi:10.1073/pnas.242603899. PMID 12477932.  
  • Hikami K, Tsuchiya N, Yabe T, Tokunaga K (2003). "Variations of human killer cell lectin-like receptors: common occurrence of NKG2-C deletion in the general population.". Genes Immun. 4 (2): 160–7. doi:10.1038/sj.gene.6363940. PMID 12618865.  
  • Miyashita R, Tsuchiya N, Hikami K, et al. (2004). "Molecular genetic analyses of human NKG2C (KLRC2) gene deletion.". Int. Immunol. 16 (1): 163–8. doi:10.1093/intimm/dxh013. PMID 14688071.  
  • Gerhard DS, Wagner L, Feingold EA, et al. (2004). "The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC).". Genome Res. 14 (10B): 2121–7. doi:10.1101/gr.2596504. PMID 15489334.  
  • Ortega C, Romero P, Palma A, et al. (2005). "Role for NKG2-A and NKG2-C surface receptors in chronic CD4+ T-cell responses.". Immunol. Cell Biol. 82 (6): 587–95. doi:10.1111/j.0818-9641.2004.01284.x. PMID 15550116.  
  • Gumá M, Busch LK, Salazar-Fontana LI, et al. (2005). "The CD94/NKG2C killer lectin-like receptor constitutes an alternative activation pathway for a subset of CD8+ T cells.". Eur. J. Immunol. 35 (7): 2071–80. doi:10.1002/eji.200425843. PMID 15940674.  

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.

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