The Full Wiki

K band: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

Advertisements

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

K band
Frequency Range NATO: 20 – 40 GHz
IEEE: 18 – 27 GHz

ITU Radio Band Numbers

edit

Contents

NATO K band

The NATO K band is defined as a frequency band between 20 and 40 GHz (7.5–15 mm).

IEEE K band

The IEEE K band is a portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the microwave range of frequencies ranging between 18 and 27 GHz. K band between 18 and 26.5 GHz is absorbed easily by water vapor (H2O resonance peak at 22.24 GHz, 1.35 cm).

Subdivisions

The IEEE K band is conventionally divided into three sub-bands:

  • Ka band: K-above band, 26.5–40 GHz, mainly used for radar and experimental communications.
  • K-band 18-27 GHz
  • Ku band: K-under band, 12–18 GHz, mainly used for satellite communications, terrestrial microwave communications, and radar, especially police traffic-speed detectors.

Infrared astronomy

Atmospheric windows in the infrared. The K band is the transmission window centred on 2.2 microns

In infrared astronomy, the K band refers to an atmospheric transmission window centred on 2.2 microns (in the near-infrared).

Name

The designation "K-band" stems from the German word "kurz" meaning short.[1]

Other Microwave bands

The microwave spectrum is usually defined as electromagnetic energy ranging from approximately 1 GHz to 100 GHz in frequency, but older usage includes lower frequencies. Most common applications are within the 1 to 40 GHz range. Microwave frequency bands, as defined by the Radio Society of Great Britain (RSGB), are shown in the table below:

L band 1 to 2 GHz
S band 2 to 4 GHz
C band 4 to 8 GHz
X band 8 to 12 GHz
Ku band 12 to 18 GHz
K band 18 to 26.5 GHz
Ka band 26.5 to 40 GHz
Q band 30 to 50 GHz
U band 40 to 60 GHz
V band 50 to 75 GHz
E band 60 to 90 GHz
W band 75 to 110 GHz
F band 90 to 140 GHz
D band 110 to 170 GHz

Footnote: P band is sometimes incorrectly used for Ku Band. "P" for "previous" was a radar band used in the UK ranging from 250 to 500 MHz and now obsolete per IEEE Std 521, see[1] and [2]. For other definitions see Letter Designations of Microwave Bands

See also

References


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message