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Kampala
Kampala
Kampala is located in Uganda
Kampala
Map of Uganda showing the location of Kampala.
Coordinates: 00°18′49″N 32°34′52″E / 0.31361°N 32.58111°E / 0.31361; 32.58111
Country  Uganda
District Kampala District
Area
 - Total 189 km2 (73 sq mi)
 - Land 176 km2 (68 sq mi)
 - Water 13 km2 (5 sq mi)
Elevation 1,190 m (3,904 ft)
Population (2008 Estimate)
 - Total 1,420,200
 Density 7,514.3/km2 (19,461.9/sq mi)
Time zone EAT (UTC+3)

Kampala is the largest city and capital of Uganda. The city is divided into five boroughs that oversee local planning: Kampala Central, Kawempe Division, Makindye Division, Nakawa Division and Lubaga Division. The city is coterminous with Kampala District.

Contents

History

Kampala in early 1950s

Mutesa I the Kabaka (king) of Buganda had chosen the area that was to become Kampala as one of his favorite hunting grounds. The area was made up of numerous rolling hills and lush wetlands. It was an ideal breeding ground for various game, particularly a species of antelope, the Impala (Aepyceros melampus). The origin of the word impala is likely from the Zulu language in South Africa.[1]

The city grew as the capital of the Buganda kingdom, from which several buildings survive, including the Kasubi Tombs (built in 1881), the Buganda Parliament, the Buganda Court of Justice and the Naggalabi Buddo Coronation Site. Severely damaged in the Uganda-Tanzania War, the city has since then been rebuilt with constructions of new buildings including hotels, banks, shopping malls, educational institutions, hospitals and improvement of war torn buildings and infrastructure. Traditionally, Kampala was a city of seven hills, but over time it has come to have a lot more.

Features

Street in the city centre.

The main campus of Makerere University, one of East and Central Africa's premier institutes of higher learning, can be found in the Makerere Hill area of the City. Kampala is also home to the headquarters of the East African Development Bank, located on Nakasero Hill.

Kampala is said to be built on seven hills, although this is not quite accurate.

  1. The first hill in historical importance is Kasubi Hill, which is where the Kasubi Tombs of the previous Kabakas are housed.
  2. The second is Mengo Hill where the present Lubiri (Kabaka's Palace) is and the Headquarters of the Buganda Court of Justice and of the Lukiiko, Buganda's Parliament.
  3. The third is Kibuli Hill, which is home to the Kibuli Mosque. Islam was brought to Uganda before the Christian missionaries came.
  4. The fourth is Namirembe Hill, home to the Namirembe Anglican Cathedral. The Protestants were the first of the Christian Missions to arrive.
  5. The fifth is Lubaga Hill, where the Rubaga Catholic Cathedral is, and was the headquarters of the White Fathers.
  6. The sixth Nsambya, was the Headquarters of the Mill Hill Mission. It now houses Nsambya Hospital.
  7. The seventh is Kampala Hill, (also known as Old Kampala), the hill of the Impala is where the ruins of Lugard's Fort were. However, the ruins were recently destroyed (2003), when the Uganda Muslim Supreme Council (UMSC) started on reconstruction of a 15,000-seater mosque on land that included the fort. The mosque was begun by Idi Amin but was never completed. The fort was then re-located to a nearby area (a new and similar one constructed), a move that has since been a source of controversy between The Historic Buildings Conservation Trust (HBCT) of Uganda and the UMSC. The UMSC was given the gazetted land as a gift by President Idi Amin in 1972 during its inauguration. This hill is where Kampala got its name.
A view of suburban Kampala.
A restaurant In Kampala.

The City spread to Nakasero Hill where the administrative centre and the wealthiest residential area is. Nakasero is also the location of the most upscale hotels in the city including:

There is also Tank Hill, where the water storage tanks that supply the city are located. Mulago Hill is the site of Mulago Hospital, the largest hospital in Uganda. The city is now rapidly expanding to include Makindye Hill and Konge Hill. Makindye Division incorporating Kibuli, Tank Hill and Makindye now has over 300,000 residents. Medical provision in this part of town, being more recently developed, is limited. Hospitals include Kibuli Hospital, St. Francis Hospital Nsambya and the International Hospital (IHK). Philanthropic health services are provided by Hope Clinic Lukuli situated between Tank Hill, Makindye and Konge.

Suburbs include Kololo in the east on Kololo Hill, the highest hill, home to the Uganda Museum. Other suburbs include Namirembe; Kibuli; Kabalagala; Rubaga; Ntinda; Najjera; Kisaasi; Nateete; Najjanankumbi; Kira (which incorporates Banda, Kireka, Bweyogerere, Namugongo, Bulindo and Nsasa) among others.

Other features of the city include the Uganda Museum, Ugandan National Theatre, Nakasero Market and St. Balikuddembe Market (formerly Owino Market). Kampala is also known for its nightlife, which includes several casinos, notably Casino Simba in the Garden City shopping center, Kampala Casino and Mayfair Casino. Entebbe International Airport is located at Entebbe, 35 miles (56 km) away, while Port Bell on the shores of Lake Victoria is 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) away.

Also to note is that Kampala hosts one of only seven Bahá'í Houses of Worship in the world. It is known as the Mother Temple of Africa and is situated on Kikaya Hill on the outskirts of the city. Its foundation stone was laid in January 1958, and was dedicated on January 13, 1961. See Bahá'í Faith in Uganda.

Kampala going westwards has Kabaka's Lubiri, the palace of the King of Buganda. Buganda is one of the oldest kingdoms in Africa, dating back to the late 13th Century. Other landmarks include the Kasubi tombs, the magnificent mosque at old Kampala, Namirembe and Rubaga Cathedral, at the very edge there is Kasumba Square Mall at the intersection of Northern Bypass and Busega roundabout.

Transportation

In early 2007, it was announced that Kampala would remove commuter taxis from its streets and replace them with a comprehensive city bus service. The bus service was expected to cover the greater Kampala metropolitan area including Mukono, Mpigi, Bombo, Entebbe, Wakiso and Gayaza. The decision is yet to be implemented.[2]

Boda-bodas (local motorcycle transportation) are a popular mode of transport that gives access to many areas with in and outside the city. Standard fees for these range from UGX 500 to 1,000 or more. Boda-bodas are useful for passing through rush-hour traffic although they are usually poorly maintained and often dangerous. [3]

In January 2007, the mayor of Kampala City announced plans to introduce a congestion fee of Sh30,000 per vehicle per day when the bus network is launched.[4] This decision is also yet to be implemented.

Climate

Kampala features a tropical wet and dry climate, however due to city’s higher altitudes, average temperatures are noticeably cooler than what is typically seen in other cities with this type of climate. Kampala seldom gets very hot during the course of the year, it’s warmest month being January.

Another facet of Kampala’s weather is that it features two distinct wet seasons. There is a lengthy rainy season from August through December and another shorter rainy season that begins in February and lasts through June. However, the shorter rainy season sees substantially heavier rainfall per month, with the month of April typically seeing the heaviest amount of precipitation at an average of around 175 mm of rain.

Climate data for Kampala
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 33
(91)
36
(97)
33
(91)
33
(91)
29
(84)
29
(84)
29
(84)
29
(84)
31
(88)
32
(90)
32
(90)
32
(90)
36
(97)
Average high °C (°F) 28
(82)
28
(82)
27
(81)
26
(79)
25
(77)
25
(77)
25
(77)
25
(77)
27
(81)
27
(81)
27
(81)
27
(81)
26
(79)
Average low °C (°F) 18
(64)
18
(64)
18
(64)
18
(64)
17
(63)
17
(63)
17
(63)
16
(61)
17
(63)
17
(63)
17
(63)
17
(63)
17
(63)
Record low °C (°F) 12
(54)
14
(57)
13
(55)
14
(57)
15
(59)
12
(54)
12
(54)
12
(54)
13
(55)
13
(55)
14
(57)
12
(54)
12
(54)
Precipitation mm (inches) 46
(1.81)
61
(2.4)
130
(5.12)
175
(6.89)
147
(5.79)
74
(2.91)
46
(1.81)
86
(3.39)
91
(3.58)
97
(3.82)
122
(4.8)
99
(3.9)
1,174
(46.22)
Source: BBC Weather [5] 2009-08-21

Demographics

Kampala has a diverse ethnic population, although the Baganda - the local ethnic group - make up over 60% of the greater Kampala region. The city's ethnic makeup has been defined by political and economic factors. During the rule of Milton Obote and Idi Amin, who were both from northern Uganda, a significant number of northern Ugandans moved into Kampala during the 1960s, 70's and 80's Most served in the armed forces and the police. Most settled around the areas where the Military and Police barracks were located - Naguru, Bugolobi and Mbuya. With the overthrow of Milton Obote in 1986, many northern Ugandans left the city. At the same time a large number of western Ugandans, particularly the Banyankole, moved into the city, reflecting the large proportion of western Ugandans in the new government of Yoweri Museveni.[6]

The mismanagement of Uganda's economy during the 1970s and 1980s meant that there were fewer employment opportunities outside Kampala. This encouraged many people from around the country to move into the city, and most have not moved back to their home districts after the revitalization of the economy in the 1990s and 2000s.

Kampala at night.

Inter-tribal marriage in Uganda is still rare, and although many Kampala residents have been born and bred in the city they still define themselves by their tribal roots. This is more evident in the suburbs of the city, where local languages are spoken widely alongside English, Swahili and Luganda. Apart from the Baganda and Banyankole, other large ethnic groups include the Basoga, Bafumbira, Batoro, Bakiga, Alur, Bagisu,Banyoro, Iteso and Acholi.[7]

Economy

Air Uganda has its head office in Kampala.[8]

Population

The national census in 2002 estimated the population of the city at 1,189,142. The Uganda Bureau of Statistics estimated the population of Kampala at 1,420,200 in 2008. [9]

External links

See also

Demographics of Uganda

Photos

References

  1. ^ New African, November 2007
  2. ^ Kampala Bus Project Planned
  3. ^ Boda bodas leading cause of hospital casualties
  4. ^ Road Service Fees are Planned
  5. ^ "Average Conditions Kampala, Uganda" (in English). BBC Weather. http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/world/city_guides/results.shtml?tt=TT000750. Retrieved August 21 2009. 
  6. ^ Government is dominated by people from Western Uganda
  7. ^ Ethnic Groups of Uganda
  8. ^ "Air Uganda increases flights to Dar." New Vision. Monday 23 February 2009. Retrieved on 19 October 2009.Since assuming power in early 1986, Museveni's government has taken important steps toward economic rehabilitation. The country's infrastructure—notably its transport and communications systems which were destroyed by war and neglect—is being rebuilt. Recognizing the need for increased external support, Uganda negotiated a policy framework paper with the IMF and the World Bank in 1987. It subsequently began implementing economic policies designed to restore price stability and sustainable balance of payments, improve capacity utilization, rehabilitate infrastructure, restore producer incentives through proper price policies, and improve resource mobilization and allocation in the public sector. These policies produced positive results. Inflation, which ran at 240% in 1987 and 42% in June 1992, was 5.4% for fiscal year 1995-96 and 7.3% in 2003. Investment as a percentage of GDP was estimated at 20.9% in 2002 compared to 13.7% in 1999. Private sector investment, largely financed by private transfers from abroad, was 14.9% of GDP in 2002. Gross national savings as a percentage of GDP was estimated at 5.5% in 2002. The Ugandan Government has also worked with donor countries to reschedule or cancel substantial portions of the country's external debts. Uganda is a member of the WTO.
  9. ^ 2002 and 2008 Population Estimates for Kampala

Coordinates: 00°18′49″N 32°34′52″E / 0.31361°N 32.58111°E / 0.31361; 32.58111

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Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

Africa : East Africa : Uganda : Kampala
Kampala is the capital city of Uganda. It is in the South Central part of the country close to the shores of Lake Victoria.
A view of Burton Street in Kampala City
A view of Burton Street in Kampala City

Understand

The people of Kampala, and Ugandans in general, are very kind and friendly and are very approachable.

Kampala, with a population of approximately 1 million, is by far the largest city in Uganda. It is not yet completely overwhelmed with traffic and sprawl like Nairobi and Lagos. Additionally, Kampala is very safe to walk around, even at night, a welcome fact for many a high-strung visitor arriving from Nairobi.

Uganda, as the recipient of massive amounts of Western aid money, hosts large numbers of Non Governmental Organizations (NGOs). Most of those NGOs are based in Kampala, so there is an established expat scene in the city.'

Get in

When coming to Kampala by air, you will actually arrive in the city of Entebbe, 35km (22mi) southwest of Kampala.
Image:Entebbe Kampala Route.jpg
From Entebbe to Kampala
Entebbe Airport
Entebbe Airport

At entry:

  • Typically you will be required to pay 50 USD for entry visa, so have the money ready in cash (USD or USh) to pay at passport control - they do not accept credit cards. In any case check whether a visa is required before arrival for your specific nationality;
  • Normally you will need to show international vaccination certificate for Yellow Fever, however the rule is not applied strictly.

You can get from Entebbe to Kampala:

  • via taxi (approx 30,000 USh one way)
  • minibus (approx 2,000Ush one way)
  • hotel shuttle (e.g. if you have a reservation with Sheraton ask for their shuttle - 39,000 USh added to your hotel bill, for one way trip if shared - chances are very high there are other hotel guests arriving on your flight).

Get around

There are three methods of public transportation: boda bodas, matatu, and special hires. The fastest method is the boda bodas; motorcycles that you see all over the city. You won't be in Kampala long before being propositioned by a Boda driver. If you're not interested, a simple 'no' will get them to leave you alone. You can get most anywhere on the back of one for between 1,000 and 2,000 USh, but make sure to agree on the fare before the ride begins. Men usually ride facing forward while women are expected to ride side saddle; very risky. Females can get away with riding facing the front, but may be accused of riding "like a man," though the locals are fairly understanding of female tourists doing this.

Boda Bodas are extremely dangerous as their drivers will do whatever it takes to get you to your destination quickly. Expect to dart in front of and against traffic and even though crowds of pedestrains when necessary. Boda boda accidents account for most of the hospital visits and traffic fatalities in Kampala; you have been warned!

Boda Bodas
Boda Bodas
Boda bodas got their name from the bicycle taxis that operated at some of the busy border crossing points. Buses had to discharge their passengers at the exit border control, who then had to walk to the entry border control. The distance across no man's land at some borders can be considerable. Hence the bicycle taxis would cry "boda boda" ("border to border") to the weary travellers. These bicycle taxis can still be found in most smaller Ugandan towns, however, in Kampala they have been replaced by scooters.

Matatus are a series of minibuses that follow relatively preset routes all over the city and many other parts of the country. Confusingly, they are known taxis in Uganda. Each matatu has a driver and a conductor, both of whom will shout the destinations of their vehicle out the windows. Don't be frightened if you can't understand what they're saying. Ask one of them for your destination and you'll be told yes or no. When you get in, expect to be squeezed. Each vehicle is licensed to carry 14 people, but they will pack in as many will fit (and their belongings). If you don't like this it's a good idea to sit in the back of the vehicle, since usually the squeezing is limited to the first 2 rows. When you reach your destination, tell your conductor "Stage" and they will stop the van. There are also a number of staging points where the driver will stop and wait until they can fill the vehicle. This can take a few seconds or several minutes; just be patient. You pay the conductor when you exit, although some people give the conductor money while the vehicle is moving so that he can make change ahead of time. The normal fare is 300-500 USh per person when driving into the city, 500-1000 Ush when driving outward.

If you aren't up for the thrill of the Bodas and don't have time for a matatu, taxis, also called special hires are readily available at most central locations. A few taxis have meters, but most have not. Be sure to agree on the fare before you get in the car or you may be in for a nasty shock. Don't be afraid to haggle either; most destinations can be reached for 5,000 USh.

There are plans to ban all boda-bodas and matatus from the city centre by January 2007, in an effort to clean up the city before the Commonwealth Heads of Government meeting.

  • The Uganda Museum.
  • Kasubi tombs - where the remains of the Kings of Buganda were buried.
  • Nommo art gallery
  • National Theatre
  • Cathedrals - Rubaga and Namirembe
  • Parliament of Uganda (and independence monument).
  • Raft the headwaters of the Nile. Two companies offer this service: Nile River Explorers and Adrift.
  • Bungee jump dipping your head in the headwaters of the Nile.
  • Do an ATV safari along the headwaters of the Nile, driving through various small towns.
Kampala Market
Kampala Market

Owino market is one of the largest in this region of Africa. The endless booths that line the chaotic alleys of Owino offer a mind-boggling array everything from homemade irons, to American hand-me-down-clothes with the Goodwill price tags still on then, to an amazing array of African foods, to any and everything else under the sun. Everything at Owinio starts cheap and gets cheaper with bargaining. Owino was completely destroyed by fire mid-February 2009, and is under reconstruction at the time of writing (16. March 09).

Owino is located near the center of Kampala, and any Boda or taxi driver will know how to get you there. Come prepared for a crowded maze of goods and people. Nakasero market is also interesting, more accessible from Kampala road and better suited for a (relaxed) stroll.

If you're in the market for souvenirs, check out the craft market on Buganda Road or the slightly larger crafts market behind the national theater near the Garden City complex. Also on Buganda Rd. across the street from the craft market you find a number of tailors if you are looking to have clothes sewn. And if you're tired from shopping the (upscale) cafe 1000 Cups of Coffee is a relaxing Mzungu hangout.

On the complete opposite end of the spectrum from Owino is Garden City. Garden City is Kampala's upscale mall, and if you are in the market for an Internet cafe, a Forex bureau, coffee shop, an expensive pair of shoes, a western-style grocery store, a travel agent, a cinema, and more under the same roof, then Garden City is for you. Garden City can be a welcome change from the hustle and bustle of the centre of Kampala.

Aside from Garden City, other western-style supermarkets include Shoprite Checkers (in Lugogo, on the Jinja road) and Uchumi (at Garden City).

Next door to the Shoprite is is another huge modern shop called Game which sells DIY stuff, camping chairs, torches, batteries etc. There is also a chicken and chips cafe, a souvenir shop, a couple of banks, a phone shop etc.

  • Uganda Crafts 2000 Ltd., Plot 32-36 Bombo Road (Heading towards Wandegeya from City Square, Uganda Crafts is in the basement shop of the DLCO-EA building, between Teacher's House and Bible House.), 256 414 250 077, [1]. 9AM - 6PM. Uganda Crafts is Uganda's oldest fair trade craft shop. Has been working with disadvantaged artisans since 1983. We are known for our baskets, but also stock lots of traditional Ugandan products, including musical instruments, jewelry, batiks, carvings, and bark cloth items. We also carry products from Kenya, Rwanda, and the Congo. We are certified fair trade by the International Fair Trade Association, which means that we pay our artisans promptly and fairly. Kasumba Square Mall is at the edge of Kampala west at the intersection of Busega Round about and Northern bypass highway, This Mall was developed as to alleviate congestion and to deliver goods and services to the community as Kampala is becoming congested city due to rapid population growth.  edit

Eat

There are a number of dining options in Kampala ranging from the cheap and local to the very fancy (and very expensive).

Budget

Everywhere you go you'll see signs for little hole-in-the-wall restaurants (including some called "pork joints"). Most of these places don't have menus, so you'll have to ask what's available. Common options include meat (usually beef), rice, beans, matooke (a starchy plant that looks like a green banana, served mashed), and so on. Be sure to ask the price ahead of time so that you don't get surprised later on. Prices are typically 500 USh per item, but can vary. Sodas and bottled water will cost more too. Matoke with groundnut sauce can be delicious!

Mid-range

Jinga Road is a good place for a variety of meals.

  • Garden City. The food court at this shopping center offers a wide variety of options including Lebanese, Italian, Indian, and more. Unlike a traditional food court, you order from a menu and a waiter brings food to your table. There is a good Indian restaurant on the roof of Garden City, and a steak restaurant that's quite good.
  • New York Kitchen, Garden City Basement (next to Stanbic bank parking garage). Has an assortment of authentic NY style food items.
  • Fang Fang Chinese. Decent Chinese food.
  • Just Kicking, Kisementi shopping Centre, good choice of pub food and continental dishes, weekend nights BBQ.
  • Paradise, Sheraton Kampala. Features a variety of Indian and continental dishes. Main course range from 20,000 to 40,000UGX. The wines includes South African and a number of European selections, ranging from 40,000 to 150,000UGX.
  • Serena Hotel, just down the hill from the Sheraton. A variety of South Asian and African dishes prepared with flair. A complete meal for two will run to about 200,000UGX, excluding alcohol.
  • Khana Kzzana, This is one of the best (more expensive) Indian restaurants: It is on Acacia Avenue, up from the Protea Hotel, in Kololo.
  • Mamba Point, This is one of the best (more expensive) Italian places. The address is 22 Akil Bua Road-Nakasero: 031-256-3000. Be sure to go to the Italian Restaurant on Akil Bua Road, not the Pizzeria on Lumumba Ave—-although the Pizzeria is one of the best in town.
  • Krua Thai, This is the best Thai in Kampala, if not all of Uganda. It is located on Windsor Crescent, Kololo (next to Athena Club). Closed Sundays. 041-4234852 or 0712-777433.
  • The Pyramids Casino, This is the place to go when someone else is paying. It is more expensive than just about anywhere, except for the Serena. It has good pastas and meat, and is a bit more interesting for continental/fusion food than major hotels like the Sheraton or Serena. It is on Yusef Lule Road, across from the Golf Course.
  • Fang Fang Chinese Restaurant, One of the best Chinese places. There are two in Kampala-- one with an attached hotel (nearer to the Sheraton) and open to outdoors (so don't forget to wear bug spray). They keep two white rabbits that hop on the grass in the main patio area and will put up with children petting them if you feed them a carrot or cucumber. The second Fang Fang is in downtown Kampala at Communications House; they have indoor seating and a roof terrace.
Khana Kazana - the waiting area before you're seated
Khana Kazana - the waiting area before you're seated
There are many Indian Restaurants in Kampala, like Haandi on Kampala road, Masala chat and Govinda on Dewington Road, Khana Khazana and Khyber Pass speak Hotel behind NSSF, and Indian Summer in Tankhill Parade.

Drink

Do not drink the tap water. Spring water brands like Rwenzori and Blue Wave can be trusted.

If you feel like going out, go out, you should be safe, just exercise common sense, Ugandans are very sociable. There are several clubs such as Club Silk and Ange Noir.

For a relaxed drink with an international crowd head to 'Just Kicking' Bar in Kisementi, a few minutes from the city centre. It gets very lively during weekend nights and whenever a major football match is screened.

Uganda does, however, have a serious drink problem with the U.N. saying it has the highest alcohol comsumption rate in the world [2], much of this is sold on backstreets, hence official figures don't rate it so highly. Don't let this put you off, the city is still safe even with this undesired tag.

  • Backpackers [3] in Kampala is a major backpacker hangout, similar to Red Chili Guesthouse.
  • Red Chili Hideaway, in Bugolobi, [4]. Excellent for cheap, clean and safe camping, dormitory or cottage accommodation. A major backpacker hangout. They've got a nice garden, hangout space, free internet, and generally it's a good place to get information from other travelers.
  • Hotel City Square, Plot 42 Kampala Road (On Constitution Square), 256414 251451, [5]. checkin: to 11pm; checkout: 10am. A simple, clean and safe hotel, with a great location overlooking constitution sqaure. The staff are very helpful, the rooms are clean with running hot water. A great restaurant on the first floor over looking the square with comfort food (burgers etc) as well as great local dishes 'matoke' and fresh fish 25 - 35$ USD.  edit
  • Protea Hotel Kampala, Kololo. 35km from Entebbe Airport, the brand new Protea Hotel Kampala offers 4-star luxury and 5-star service. 59 rooms and 11 suites, all en-suite and air-conditioned; restaurant, bar, satellite television, air-con. Close to gym, tennis and squash courts etc. Also includes a Business Centre, wireless internet throughout, currency exchange, 24 hour room service and Reception.
  • Hotel Ruch [6] Central location right next to Sheraton. Well-maintained Bed & Breakfast Hotel with nice gardens and a bar. On-site Wi-Fi available. Rates are low, making this good value for money.
  • Fang Fang Hotel on Ssezibwa Road in Kampala has clean rooms, air-con available, hot running water, a great Chinese restaurant on the premises (with nice garden seating), and is not overpriced. Recommended. Centrally located near UWA offices.
  • Aminaz Garden Place,in Kololo Kampala,[7]. Very good, clean and safe accommodation
  • Prestige Apartments, [8]. Kampala apartments that are still cheaper than going with a hotel on a long-term basis. All apartments are air-conditioned, have on-site wireless internet access, direct dial telephones. Location is very central, thereby making this a serious choice compared to Hotels.
  • Sheraton, [9]. The Sheraton is the highest end hotel in Kampala, and occupies very nice manicured grounds. The Sheraton is currently (as of July 2005) undergoing renovations; the ensuing chaos make the very high rates seem a bit cheeky at the moment.

Speke Resort at Munyonyo, about 10km from the centre is excellent. The grounds have vervet monkeys running wild along with plaintain eaters, hammerkop and the obligatory marabou storks. On the shore of Lake Victoria it really is worth the money.

  • The newly opened Golf Course Hotel next to the Garden City Complex offers huge rooms (and apartments), modern facilities a large and fancy (but shallow) pool and very relaxing views of the tropic golf course. Not cheap but very good value.

Stay safe

Kampala is a relatively safe city. It is fairly safe to walk or take matatus around some areas at night, but don't take unecessary chances.

Boda-boda motorcycle taxis are notoriously dangerous, but are sometimes so convenient it's difficult not to use them. If you do decide to use them regularly consider buying a helmet (they are not provided by the driver).

Don't plan on using your credit card. If it is accepted, there is a good chance of fraud. Safer is withdrawing money from ATM's using your VISA-card, try Stanbic bank near Speke Hotel. To stay safe, also be aware of the large number of prostitutes in Rock Garden at Speke Hotel. There are several stories about guys being duped, drinking beers laced with rohypnol, ending up short on cash, cell phones, credit cards and bank cheques.

Internet cafes

*KayeNet Internet cafe [11] is a chain of Internet cafes located in Kampala, Uganda

BRANCH 1 (Nankulabye) Beauty House, Plot 494 Makerere Hill Rd, P.O.Box 14289, Mengo, Kampala, Uganda, Opposite Chez Johnson Hotel

BRANCH 2 (Nalubwama arcade) Nalubwama arcade,1st floor- shop f1-2, Ben Kiwanuka street, Kampala, Uganda, Opposite old taxi park

BRANCH 3 (Wandegeya) Plot 151, Bombo Rd, Wandegeya, Kampala, Uganda, Opposite Stanbic bank, Above Kookee supermarket

BRANCH 4 (Market Street) Energy Centre Building, Level 3, Shop 36, Market Street, Nakasero, Kampala

info@kayesoftinternet.com www.kayenet.com

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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

English

Proper noun

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Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Kampala

  1. capital, and largest city in Uganda

Simple English

[[File:|200px|thumb|Location of Kampala]] Kampala is the capital of Uganda. More than 1,200,000 people live there. The city is located on the shore of Lake Victoria.

The Ugandan National Theatre is located in Kampala. There is also a university in the city.


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