Kanada: Wikis

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It has been claimed that Kashyapa, later known as Kanada (Sanskrit: कणाद; also transliterated as Canada as well as other forms) was a Hindu sage and philosopher who founded the philosophical school of Vaisheshika. [1] He talked of Dvyanuka (biatomic molecule) and tryanuka (triatomic molecule). He probably lived around the 2nd century BCE,[2] while other sources claim he lived in the 6th Century BC. [3] [4] It is believed that he was born in Prabhas Kshetra (near Dwaraka) in Gujarat, India.

His primary area of study was Rasavādam, considered to be a type of alchemy. He is said to have believed that all living beings are composed of five elements: water, fire, earth, air, ether. Vegetables have only water, insects have water and fire, birds have water, fire, earth and air, and Humans, the top of the creation, have ether - the sense of discrimination (time, space, mind) are one. He theorized that Gurutva was responsible for the falling of objects on the Earth.

Many believe that Kanada originated the concept of atom. An interesting story states that this theory occurred to him while he was walking with food in his hand. As he nibbled at the food in his hand, throwing away the small particles, it occurred to him that he could not divide the food into further parts and thus the idea of a matter which cannot be divided further came into existence. He called that indivisible matter as ' Anu ' .i.e. atom.

Adherents of the school of philosophy founded by Kanada considered the atom to be indestructible, and hence eternal. They believed atoms to be minute objects invisible to the naked eye which come into being and vanish in an instant. This Indian concept of the atom was developed independently[5] and possibly prior (depending on which dates one accepts for the life of Kanada) to the development of the idea in the Greco-Roman world. Indian theories about the atom are greatly abstract and enmeshed in philosophy as they were based on logic and not on personal experience or experimentation. Thus the Indian theories lacked an empirical base, but in the words of A.L. Basham, the veteran Australian Indologist “they were brilliant imaginative explanations of the physical structure of the world, and in a large measure, agreed with the discoveries of modern physics.”[6]

According to author Dilip M. Salwi, "if Kanada’s sutras are analysed, one would find that his atomic theory was far more advanced than those forwarded later by the Greek philosophers, Leucippus and Democritus."[7]

The actual historical existence of "Kanada" as an individual is uncertain.

References

  1. ^ The Brahma Sutras - Chapter 2
  2. ^ Oliver Leaman, Key Concepts in Eastern Philosophy. Routledge, 1999, page 269.
  3. ^ Anu and Parmanu - Indian ideas about Atomic physics, http://www.newsfinder.org/site/more/anu_and_parmanu_indian_ideas_about_atomic_physics/
  4. ^ "Kanada," Dilip M. Salwi, http://www.4to40.com/legends/index.asp?id=183
  5. ^ Anu and Parmanu - Indian ideas about Atomic physics, http://www.newsfinder.org/site/more/anu_and_parmanu_indian_ideas_about_atomic_physics/
  6. ^ Anu and Parmanu - Indian ideas about Atomic physics, http://www.newsfinder.org/site/more/anu_and_parmanu_indian_ideas_about_atomic_physics/
  7. ^ "Kanada," Dilip M. Salwi, http://www.4to40.com/legends/index.asp?id=183

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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

See also Kanáda

Contents

Bosnian

Proper noun

Kanada f.

  1. Canada

Croatian

Proper noun

Kanada f.

  1. Canada

Czech

Proper noun

Kanada f.

  1. Canada

Estonian

Proper noun

Kanada

  1. Canada

Finnish

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Finnish Wikipedia has an article on:
Kanada

Wikipedia fi

Proper noun

Kanada

  1. Canada

Declension

Derived terms

Compounds


German

Pronunciation

Proper noun

Kanada

  1. Canada

Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French Canada

Proper noun

Kanada

  1. Canada

Hungarian

Kanada
Wikipedia-logo.png
Hungarian Wikipedia has an article on:
Kanada

Wikipedia hu

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /ˈkɒnɒdɒ/
  • Hyphenation: Ka‧na‧da

Proper noun

Kanada

  1. Canada (country in North America)

Icelandic

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /ˈkʰaːnaːta/

Proper noun

Kanada

  1. Canada

Declension


Japanese

Proper noun

Kanada (katakana カナダ)

  1. カナダ: Canada

Lithuanian

Wikipedia-logo.png
Lithuanian Wikipedia has an article on:
Kanada

Wikipedia lt

Kanada

Proper noun

Kanada

  1. Canada (country in North America)

This Lithuanian entry was created from the translations listed at Canada. It may be less reliable than other entries, and may be missing parts of speech or additional senses. Please also see Kanada in the Lithuanian Wiktionary. This notice will be removed when the entry is checked. (more information) October 2009


Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /kaˈnada/

Proper noun

Kanada f.

  1. Canada

Declension

Singular only
Nominative Kanada
Genitive Kanady
Dative Kanadzie
Accusative Kanadę
Instrumental Kanadą
Locative Kanadzie
Vocative Kanado

Derived terms


Serbian

Proper noun

Kanada f.

  1. Canada

See also


Slovene

Wikipedia-logo.png
Slovene Wikipedia has an article on:
Kanada

Wikipedia sl

Proper noun

Kanada f.

  1. Canada (country in North America)

This Slovene entry was created from the translations listed at Canada. It may be less reliable than other entries, and may be missing parts of speech or additional senses. Please also see Kanada in the Slovene Wiktionary. This notice will be removed when the entry is checked. (more information) April 2008


Swahili

Proper noun

Kanada

  1. Canada (country in North America)

This Swahili entry was created from the translations listed at Canada. It may be less reliable than other entries, and may be missing parts of speech or additional senses. Please also see Kanada in the Swahili Wiktionary. This notice will be removed when the entry is checked. (more information) August 2009


Swedish

Proper noun

Kanada

  1. Canada

Turkish

Proper noun

Kanada

  1. Canada (country in North America)

Declension


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