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.This article contains Japanese text. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of kanji and kana.^ You'll learn kanji, kana, and japanese vocabulary.
  • Art of writing japanese kanji and kana - All for your japanese studies! 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.japanese-kanji.org [Source type: General]

^ Labels: Japanese name , Japanese symbols , kanji .

^ Learn japanese kanji, kana and vocabulary.
  • Art of writing japanese kanji and kana - All for your japanese studies! 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.japanese-kanji.org [Source type: General]

.About this sound Kanji (漢字?) are the Chinese characters that are used in the modern Japanese logographic writing system along with hiragana (ひらがな, 平仮名), katakana (カタカナ, 片仮名), Indo Arabic numerals, and the occasional use of the Latin alphabet (known as the Romanization of Japanese, or "Rōmaji").^ Kanji is the term for Chinese characters that are used in the Japanese language.

^ Kanji means "Chinese Character" in Japanese.
  • tk kanji 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC elf.org [Source type: General]

^ Furigana : Hiragana characters written next to a kanji character to indicate Rōmaji : Literally, "Roman character"; the name for a number of systems used to write Japanese using the Latin alphabet generally used in the West.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

The Japanese term kanji (漢字) literally means "Han characters".
Kanji
Type Logographic
Spoken languages Old Japanese, Japanese
Parent systems
Sister systems Hanja, Zhuyin, Simplified Chinese, Chu Nom, Khitan script, Jurchen script
ISO 15924 Hani, Hans, Hant
.Note: This page may contain IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode.^ Please Note: These pages are temporary (until we can put up a decent kanji section) and may contain broken links.
  • Kanji Articles | TheJapanesePage.com 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC thejapanesepage.com [Source type: General]

^ Public and university libraries may contain volumes on Kanji symbols and dictionaries to provide translations.
  • Kanji Tattoos - Kanji Tattoo Designs | Tattoo Art 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC tattoos-and-art.com [Source type: General]

^ Note that the codes listed in the database may contain some errors.

Chinese characters
Precursors
Traditional Chinese
Variant characters
Simplified Chinese
Simplified Chinese (2nd-round)
Traditional/Simplified (debate)
Kanji (Japanese)
Hanja (Korean)
Hán tự (Vietnamese)
Sawndip (Zhuang)
East Asian calligraphy
Input methods

Contents

History

.Chinese characters first came to Japan on articles imported from China.^ Since the Kanji writing system was imported from China, most characters have at least the original Chinese pronunciation ( on’yomi ) as well as a Japanese pronunciation ( kun’yomi ) corresponding to the word for which the Kanji was introduced.
  • 漢字札 - The Fun Little Kanji Learning Game for Mobile Devices 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC kanjifuda.com [Source type: General]

^ ARTICLE from the Encyclopædia Britannica Japanese writing in Japanese writing, characters adapted from Chinese characters and usually employed for writing nouns, verb roots, adjectives, and other important words.
  • kanji (Japanese writing) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: Reference]

^ This is the most common style for Chinese characters and is used in everyday writing in both China and Japan.
  • Japanese Tattoo Designs by Master Calligrapher Eri Takase 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.stockkanji.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.An early instance of such an import was a gold seal given by the emperor of the Eastern Han Dynasty in 57 AD[1].^ Kanji Styles Most printed kanji are written in a style called kaisho , which originated in China late in the Han dynasty (around 200 AD).
  • kanji@Everything2.com 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • kanji@Everything2.com 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.It is not clear when Japanese people started to gain a command of Classical Chinese by themselves.^ Just as Japanese people love to use English symbols and phrases on T-shirt, logo or tattoo design, westerners have started using Japanese Kanji Symbols for their own design needs.
  • 100% Accurate Kanji Translation 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.dsfy.com [Source type: General]

^ It's rather neat to see all the uses one kanji was up to over the years/Chinese classics/Japanese literature.
  • Kanji as Argo | No-sword 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC no-sword.jp [Source type: General]

^ At first used strictly in classical Chinese texts, the kanji were later adapted to Japanese as well.
  • Japanese Symbols - Japanese Translation - Kanji Tattoo - Calligraphy 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.karma-net.com [Source type: General]

.The first Japanese documents were probably written by Chinese immigrants.^ The written Japanese and Chinese languages are composed not of individual letters but of ideographs or pictographs, which represent an idea or thing.
  • Kanjis - Common Mistakes With Kanji Tattoos 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tao-of-tattoos.com [Source type: General]

^ The ancient Japanese language developed without a form of written expression and was first written down in kanji which were introduced from China more than 1500 years ago.
  • Sensei's Pages - Winter 2005 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC sensei.jpf-sydney.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ All written Japanese evolved from written Chinese, and were modified to create the different sounds of the Japanese language.

For example, the diplomatic correspondence from King Bu of Wa to Emperor Shun of the Liu Song Dynasty in 478 has been praised for its skillful use of allusion. .Later, groups of people called fuhito were organized under the monarch to read and write Classical Chinese.^ On-Yomi (Chinese Reading) When Chinese characters were adopted to write Japanese sometimes the original Chinese pronunciation was used.
  • Japanese Tattoo Designs by Master Calligrapher Eri Takase 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.stockkanji.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Japanese people can read them, but relatively few can write them.
  • neomarxisme: Kanji Causes Manga: Why? 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.pliink.com [Source type: General]

^ In Kanji Fuda, under “Settings”, one can choose which parts of a Kanji reading to show: at least one of the translated “meaning”, the Chinese on’yomi , and/or the Japanese kun’yomi .
  • 漢字札 - The Fun Little Kanji Learning Game for Mobile Devices 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC kanjifuda.com [Source type: General]

.From the 6th century onwards, Chinese documents written in Japan tended to show interference from Japanese, suggesting the wide acceptance of Chinese characters in Japan.^ Introduced to Japan in the fourth century from China via Korea, kanji has had to undergo several radical changes in order to accommodate the differences between the very dissimilar Japanese and Chinese languages.
  • Japanese Tattoo Designs by Master Calligrapher Eri Takase 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.stockkanji.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ ARTICLE from the Encyclopædia Britannica Japanese writing in Japanese writing, characters adapted from Chinese characters and usually employed for writing nouns, verb roots, adjectives, and other important words.
  • kanji (Japanese writing) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: Reference]

^ The written Japanese and Chinese languages are composed not of individual letters but of ideographs or pictographs, which represent an idea or thing.
  • Kanjis - Common Mistakes With Kanji Tattoos 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tao-of-tattoos.com [Source type: General]

.The Japanese language itself had no written form at the time kanji was introduced.^ They are written in Japanese kanji symbols.

^ This Japanese symbol is written in kanji.

^ Nakama introduces kanji in the textbook itself.
  • Vocabulary/Kanji/Conjugation Exercise for Japanese 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC tell.fll.purdue.edu [Source type: Reference]

.Originally texts were written in the Chinese language and would have been read as such.^ The written Japanese and Chinese languages are composed not of individual letters but of ideographs or pictographs.

^ If I did not know English, of all the major languages out there, the only language I would be more concerned with having to learn is Chinese - and only because of the kanji alphabet .
  • Kanji Alphabet - Web - Copernic 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC ws.copernic.com [Source type: General]

^ The kun-reading yo(bu) call, call out to, invoke etc would normally be written using the Kanji character followed by the Hiragana for bu , as shown at right.
  • RFFC: Names in Kanji 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www1.rffc.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Over time, however, a system known as kanbun (漢文) emerged, which involved using Chinese text with diacritical marks to allow Japanese speakers to restructure and read Chinese sentences, by changing word order and adding particles and verb endings, in accordance with the rules of Japanese grammar.^ "Chinese reading by katakana" setting added.

^ Chinese reading while 訓読み is the Japanese reading.

^ Kun-Yomi (Japanese Reading) When the Chinese writing system was adopted in Japan many times Japanese already had a word and so the Japanese was used when reading the kanji .
  • Japanese Tattoo Designs by Master Calligrapher Eri Takase 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.stockkanji.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Chinese characters also came to be used to write Japanese words, resulting in the modern kana syllabaries.^ Japan ese name for Chinese (Han) logographic characters used in writing Japanese.
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Kanji are Chinese characters that have been adopted for use in the Japanese language.
  • Japanese Tattoo Designs by Master Calligrapher Eri Takase 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.stockkanji.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ So Kanji is a mixing of Chinese characters with Japanese words.
  • Japanese Language and Writing 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.sfusd.k12.ca.us [Source type: General]

.A writing system called man'yōgana (used in the ancient poetry anthology Man'yōshū) evolved that used a number of Chinese characters for their sound, rather than for their meaning.^ Kanji are the Chinese -derived character s used in the writing system of Japanese .
  • kanji@Everything2.com 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • kanji@Everything2.com 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In addition, most Kanji characters have two "readings" or pronunciations, "on-yomi" from ancient Chinese, and "kun-yomi" as the domestic word: maybe comparable to saying "ophtalmologist" or "eye doctor" in different situations, but writing them as the same symbols "eye + medic"?
  • kame news: special on kanji, for ATypI 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC kamedesign.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Ninja is a Sino-Japanese compound derived from the two kanji (Japanese characters of Chinese origin) used to write shinobi-no-mono, one of the native Japanese words for people who practice ninjutsu (sometimes transliterated as ninjitsu).
  • Best free kanji downloads. Drill Japanese Kanji and words. Build your vocabulary with a proven system. READWRITE KANJI teaches the complete 1945 jouyou Japanese kanji characters. 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.freedownloadmanager.org [Source type: General]

.Man'yōgana written in cursive style evolved into hiragana, a writing system that was accessible to women (who were denied higher education).^ Furigana : Hiragana characters written next to a kanji character to indicate Rōmaji : Literally, "Roman character"; the name for a number of systems used to write Japanese using the Latin alphabet generally used in the West.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Hiragana Cursive Style Tattoo Well, the calligraphy was made by the Russian guy who practices it for many years.

^ Eventually, the latter system evolved into the simplified hiragana and katakana syllabaries , making it possible to write in a style more reflective of spoken Japanese without confusing Chinese people.
  • kanji@Everything2.com 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • kanji@Everything2.com 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Major works of Heian era literature by women were written in hiragana.^ By the Meiji era , virtually all Japanese was written in a combination of kana and kanji, with kanji for the root word s and hiragana or katakana for particle s and conjugation s.
  • kanji@Everything2.com 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • kanji@Everything2.com 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Genji : The great novel of classical Japanese literature, 'The Tale of Genji' , detailing the lengthy and complex love adventures of Prince Genji; written in the late Heian period.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Katakana emerged via a parallel path: monastery students simplified man'yōgana to a single constituent element. .Thus the two other writing systems, hiragana and katakana, referred to collectively as kana, are actually descended from kanji.^ Eventually, the latter system evolved into the simplified hiragana and katakana syllabaries , making it possible to write in a style more reflective of spoken Japanese without confusing Chinese people.
  • kanji@Everything2.com 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • kanji@Everything2.com 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ There are two very good books for learning to read and write the kana: A Guide to Learning Hiragana & Katakana by Professor Kenneth Henshall, which will also show the kanji from which the kana evolved and give the index in Henshall's A Guide to Remembering Japanese Characters to that kanji, and the Japanese Kana Workbook , which is specifically designed to be used without the benefit of a teacher.
  • Japanese Kanji and Kana - Joyo96 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.joyo96.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The position of kanji in a larger context The writing systems of the world (including phonograms and logograms) Kanji and kana mixed in writing History of kanji in the Japanese language: how they became part of the language ( Manyoo gana , hiragana, and katakana; kanji and kana mixed in writing; kanji made in Japan [ Kokuji ]) 2.
  • AP Central - Effective Ways to Teach Kanji in an AP Japanese Language and Culture Course 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC apcentral.collegeboard.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In modern Japanese, kanji are used to write parts of the language such as nouns, adjective stems, and verb stems, while hiragana are used to write inflected verb and adjective endings (okurigana), particles, native Japanese words, words where the kanji is considered too difficult to read or remember, and words in which the kanji is not on the government-sanctioned list of characters.^ A Japanese font using the Hiragana alphabet .
  • Kanji Alphabet - Web - Copernic 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC ws.copernic.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Permalink Without Kanji Japanese would be difficult to read.
  • Kanji Makes Japanese Easy - Dumb Otaku 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC dumbotaku.com [Source type: General]

^ "Okurigana" are Hiragana letters that trail the kanji and indicate its inflected meaning.
  • About Kanji - QuickKanji 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC quickkanji.com [Source type: Original source]

.Katakana are used for representing onomatopoeia, non-Japanese loanwords, the names of plants and animals (with exceptions), and for emphasis on certain words.^ Japanese names are normally written using kanji characters, not katakana.
  • Kanji Alphabet - Web - Copernic 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC ws.copernic.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Eventually, simplified forms of selected kanji were used, on an acronymic principle, to represent the basic syllables of Japanese, and these became the kana .
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ These reign names, which are also used to name eras in Japanese history, are referred to as nengō .
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Local developments

.While kanji are essentially Chinese hanzi used to write Japanese, there are now significant differences between kanji and hanzi, including the use of characters created in Japan, characters that have been given different meanings in Japanese, and post World War II simplifications of the kanji.^ Kanji is different cause it looks like chinese characters.
  • kanji symbol for 'drifting' - DRIFTING.com 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.drifting.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Essential Japanese Kanji 1110 Level 2 .
  • Japanese Kanji - Learn Japanese Kanji 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.coscom.co.jp [Source type: Reference]

^ Hiragana Normally, when we write "respect" in Japanese, we use kanji symbols.

Kokuji

Kokuji (国字, "national characters") are characters particular to Japan. .Kokuji are also known as wasei kanji (和製漢字, "Chinese characters made in Japan").^ Kanji is different cause it looks like chinese characters.
  • kanji symbol for 'drifting' - DRIFTING.com 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.drifting.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ These first six levels are known as the 教育("kyōiku") kanji and are made up of 1006 characters.
  • About Kanji - QuickKanji 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC quickkanji.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Japanese Kanji symbols are actually taken from China, and like Chinese characters each symbol doesn’t actually represent a letter of the alphabet.
  • Tattoo Symbols - Kanji Characters | Free Tattoo Patterns Online 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC freetattoopatternsonline.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.There are hundreds of kokuji (see the kokuji - sci.lang.japan Frequently Asked Questions).^ Daimyō : Literally, "great name", a major feudal private land holder, of whom there were several hundred in Japan during the Edo period.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Frequently Asked Questions .
  • 100% Accurate Kanji Translation 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.dsfy.com [Source type: General]
  • FAQ Kanji - KanjiQuick Japanese English or Japanese German Kanji Dictionary and translation tool 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.kanji.de [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Many are rarely used, but a number have become important additions to the written Japanese language.^ Furigana : Hiragana characters written next to a kanji character to indicate Rōmaji : Literally, "Roman character"; the name for a number of systems used to write Japanese using the Latin alphabet generally used in the West.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Some written languages require multiple scripts (for example, Japanese, which requires at least three scripts: the hiragana and katakana syllabaries and the kanji ideographs imported from China).
  • W3C I18N FAQ: Script direction and languages 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.w3.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ One of these maintains that the nature of the written language predicates this disposition, that the kanji , the Chinese ideographs, are in themselves images and are so used by the Japanese, Vietnamese, and South Koreans ( kanji are no longer used in North Korea) as well as the Chinese.
  • neomarxisme: Kanji Causes Manga: Why? 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.pliink.com [Source type: General]

These include:
  • 峠 (とうげ tōge "mountain pass")
  • 榊 (さかき sakaki "tree, genus Cleyera")
  • 畑 (はたけ hatake "field of crops")
  • 辻 (つじ tsuji "crossroads, street")
  • 働 (どう , はたら hatara(ku) "work")
  • 腺 (せん sen, "gland"). This character has been introduced to China.[2]

Kokkun

.In addition to kokuji, there are kanji that have been given meanings in Japanese different from their original Chinese meanings.^ For instance: Are there 2 kanji with the same meaning?
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Even though they are pronounced differently, the kanji symbol means the same in both languages.
  • DragonWeave Jewelry Japanese/Chinese Kanji Charms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.dragonweave.com [Source type: General]

^ Together with the hiragana and katakana phonetic alphabets, kanji , pictographic characters originally imported from China, form the basis for written Japanese.
  • New to Japan - Language - Japanese Kanji Characters 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.japan-zone.com [Source type: General]

These kanji are not considered kokuji but are instead called kokkun (国訓) and include characters such as:
  • fuji (wisteria; Ch. téng rattan, cane, vine)
  • oki (offing, offshore; Ch. chōng rinse, minor river(Cantonese))
  • 椿 tsubaki (Camellia japonica; Ch. chūn Ailanthus)

Readings

Reading Characters in Japanese
Meaning Pronunciation
a) semantic on L1 L1
b) semantic kun L1 L2
c) phonetic on L1
d) phonetic kun L2
.*With L1 representing the language borrowed from (Chinese) and L2 representing the borrowing language (Japanese).^ The written Japanese and Chinese languages are composed not of individual letters but of ideographs or pictographs, which represent an idea or thing.
  • Kanjis - Common Mistakes With Kanji Tattoos 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tao-of-tattoos.com [Source type: General]

^ What is really difficult to find here are schools teaching asian language such as chinese, korean or japanese.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ I did, with a few of my post-grad level born and bred Japanese language teachers and a couple of Chinese classmates.
  • neomarxisme: Kanji Causes Manga: Why? 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.pliink.com [Source type: General]

[3]
.Because of the way they have been adopted into Japanese, a single kanji may be used to write one or more different words (or, in some cases, morphemes).^ 'Sudoku' is a Japanese word - so why not using Japanese Kanji for this kind of puzzles?
  • Kanji & Hanzi: Chinese Characters | Scribd 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: General]

^ Hiragana Normally, when we write "respect" in Japanese, we use kanji symbols.

^ Words in Japanese can be written three different ways.
  • 100% Accurate Kanji Translation 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.dsfy.com [Source type: General]

.From the point of view of the reader, kanji are said to have one or more different "readings". Deciding which reading is meant depends on context, intended meaning, use in compounds, and even location in the sentence.^ Not only one kanji can be learned but kanji from compounds also can be learned.

^ Many kanji characters are similar to each other, and some can have different meanings depending on context .
  • 100% Accurate Kanji Translation 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.dsfy.com [Source type: General]

^ Ninja is a Sino-Japanese compound derived from the two kanji (Japanese characters of Chinese origin) used to write shinobi-no-mono, one of the native Japanese words for people who practice ninjutsu (sometimes transliterated as ninjitsu).
  • Best free kanji downloads. Drill Japanese Kanji and words. Build your vocabulary with a proven system. READWRITE KANJI teaches the complete 1945 jouyou Japanese kanji characters. 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.freedownloadmanager.org [Source type: General]
  • Kanji downloads at VicMan 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC vicman.net [Source type: General]

.Some common kanji have ten or more possible readings.^ In some cases Kanji cannot always be read directly as a symbol and sometimes has to be combined with other Kanji to make a sentence.
  • Japanese Kanji Tattoos 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.squidoo.com [Source type: General]

^ Level two means the 1900 and some joyo kanji, plus the common names right?
  • Remembering the Kanji at last - Doubting to shuō 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC toshuo.com [Source type: General]

^ So by simplying the Kanji list you can quickly learn the basic meanings of 103 kanji and then build on that base later with stroke order, readings and possible mulitple meanings.
  • Learn Kanji: The Kanji Starter Kit — zonjineko! 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.zonjineko.com [Source type: General]

.These readings are normally categorized as either on'yomi (literally, sound reading) or kun'yomi (literally, meaning reading).^ The kun-reading yo(bu) call, call out to, invoke etc would normally be written using the Kanji character followed by the Hiragana for bu , as shown at right.
  • RFFC: Names in Kanji 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www1.rffc.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ These Kanji Concentration Games are ideal for beginners to become acquainted with the look, reading & meaning of the used Chinese characters (Kanji) and improve their memory.
  • Kanji & Hanzi: Chinese Characters | Scribd 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: General]

^ There are several kun readings for the each kanji, although some kanji can have no kun’yomi.
  • Learn Kanji: The Kanji Starter Kit — zonjineko! 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.zonjineko.com [Source type: General]

On'yomi (Chinese reading)

.The on'yomi (音読み), the Sino-Japanese reading, is the modern descendent of the Japanese approximation of the Chinese pronunciation of the character at the time it was introduced.^ On-Yomi (Chinese Reading) When Chinese characters were adopted to write Japanese sometimes the original Chinese pronunciation was used.
  • Japanese Tattoo Designs by Master Calligrapher Eri Takase 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.stockkanji.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Ninja is a Sino-Japanese compound derived from the two kanji (Japanese characters of Chinese origin) used to write shinobi-no-mono, one of the native Japanese words for people who practice ninjutsu (sometimes transliterated as ninjitsu).
  • Best free kanji downloads. Drill Japanese Kanji and words. Build your vocabulary with a proven system. READWRITE KANJI teaches the complete 1945 jouyou Japanese kanji characters. 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.freedownloadmanager.org [Source type: General]

^ It goes without saying that a good command of Kanji is necessary to read and write Japanese, and it takes time and persistence to reach the level where students can read and write Kanji fluently.
  • A Basic Kanji Book Volume 1 :: Kanji Books :: Japanese Bookstore :: TheJapanShop.com 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.thejapanshop.com [Source type: General]

.Some kanji were introduced from different parts of China at different times, and so have multiple on'yomi, and often multiple meanings.^ As this adoption happened over hundreds of years and from different parts of China a single kanji can have several different o n-yomi depending on when and from where in China the word came from.
  • Japanese Tattoo Designs by Master Calligrapher Eri Takase 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.stockkanji.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Introduced to Japan in the fourth century from China via Korea, kanji has had to undergo several radical changes in order to accommodate the differences between the very dissimilar Japanese and Chinese languages.
  • Japanese Tattoo Designs by Master Calligrapher Eri Takase 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.stockkanji.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Even though they are pronounced differently, the kanji symbol means the same in both languages.
  • DragonWeave Jewelry Japanese/Chinese Kanji Charms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.dragonweave.com [Source type: General]

Kanji invented in Japan would not normally be expected to have on'yomi, but there are exceptions, such as the character 働 "to work", which has the kun'yomi hataraku and the on'yomi dō, and 腺 "gland", which has only the on'yomi sen.
Generally, on'yomi are classified into four types:
.
  • Go-on (呉音?, "Wu sound") readings are from the pronunciation during the Southern and Northern Dynasties or Baekje, an ancient state on the Korean Peninsula, during the 5th and 6th centuries.^ According to Google, the shit came over in the 5th century, because Japanese traders needed to communicate with their Korean and Chinese counterparts.
    • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In order for the selective furigana to work correctly, every pronunciation (or reading) of kanji, including sound variations, needs to have a unit number assigned.
    • Vocabulary/Kanji/Conjugation Exercise for Japanese 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC tell.fll.purdue.edu [Source type: Reference]

    .Go may refer to the Wu region (in the vicinity of modern Shanghai), but does not appear to have this meaning in Go-on.
  • Kan-on (漢音?, "Han sound") readings are from the pronunciation during the Tang Dynasty in the 7th to 9th centuries, primarily from the standard speech of the capital, Chang'an (長安 or 长安, modern Xi'an).^ Sound refers to a model pronunciation by a native speaker.
    • Vocabulary/Kanji/Conjugation Exercise for Japanese 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC tell.fll.purdue.edu [Source type: Reference]

    ^ In order for the selective furigana to work correctly, every pronunciation (or reading) of kanji, including sound variations, needs to have a unit number assigned.
    • Vocabulary/Kanji/Conjugation Exercise for Japanese 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC tell.fll.purdue.edu [Source type: Reference]

    .Here, Kan is used in the sense of China.
  • Tō-on (唐音?, "Tang sound") readings are from the pronunciations of later dynasties, such as the Song (宋) and Ming (明).^ On-Yomi (Chinese Reading) When Chinese characters were adopted to write Japanese sometimes the original Chinese pronunciation was used.
    • Japanese Tattoo Designs by Master Calligrapher Eri Takase 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.stockkanji.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ The "on" readings are based loosely on the original Chinese pronunciation of the kanji, and are typically used when a kanji is part of a compound, i.e.
    • Learning basic japanese kanji, list of basic kanji, japanese kanji level 4 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.learn-hiragana-katakana.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Because of this, the readings given here don't make a lot of sense.
    • RFFC: Names in Kanji 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www1.rffc.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .They cover all readings adopted from the Heian era (平安) to the Edo period (江戸).^ They first appeared at the start of the Edo period, as an off-shoot of the group of highest-class courtesans.
    • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ The lists above are provided as translation guides when reading/viewing any of the material they cover (see Source column).
    • RedKitsune.org - Kanji Go 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.redkitsune.org [Source type: General]

    .This is also known as Tōsō-on (唐宋音).
  • Kan'yō-on (慣用音?, "Idiomatic sound") readings, which are mistaken or changed readings of the kanji that have become accepted into the language.^ Kanji list of Japanese Language Proficiency Test Level 4 [JLPT 4] arranged by topics (with readings) Kanji-Sudoku published this 09 / 10 / 2008 1,746 reads 0 comments 3 p.
    • Kanji & Hanzi: Chinese Characters | Scribd 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: General]

    ^ These Kanji Concentration Games are ideal for beginners to become acquainted with the look, reading & meaning of the used Chinese characters (Kanji) and improve their memory.
    • Kanji & Hanzi: Chinese Characters | Scribd 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Add to your reading list Japanese Language Writing Practice: Kanji, Katakana & Hiragana .
    • Kanji & Hanzi: Chinese Characters | Scribd 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: General]

    In some cases, they are the actual readings that accompanied the character's introduction to Japan, but do not match how the character “should” be read according to the rules of character construction and pronunciation.
Examples (rare readings in parentheses)
Kanji Meaning Go-on Kan-on Tō-on Kan'yō-on
bright myō mei (min)
go gyō

(an)
extreme goku kyoku
pearl shu shu ju (zu)
degree do (to)
transport (shu) (shu) yu
masculine
bear
child shi shi su
clear shō sei (shin)
capital kyō kei (kin)
soldier hyō hei
strong kyō
The most common form of readings is the kan-on one. .The go-on readings are especially common in Buddhist terminology such as gokuraku 極楽 "paradise", as well as in some of the earliest loans, such as the Sino-Japanese numbers.^ Most students go about learning to read Japanese in the most ineffective way possible....
  • Read Japanese | Learn how to read real Japanese - learnhundreds of Japanese words, phrases and kanji characters 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC readjapanesefast.com [Source type: General]

^ Hm, I agree to an extent (and you're not going to learn some of the odder readings of characters in most study programs).
  • Kanji as Argo | No-sword 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC no-sword.jp [Source type: General]

^ They are skilled in classic Japanese arts such as music (especially the playing of the stringed samisen ), poetry and calligraphy.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

The tō-on readings occur in some later words, such as isu 椅子 "chair", futon 布団 "mattress", and andon 行灯, "a kind of paper lantern".
.In Chinese, most characters are associated with a single Chinese sound.^ Most shirts and tattoos that people have with Chinese/Japanese characters say really dumb things.
  • Learning Kanji in Two Months | Life Outside The Box | Tynan 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC tynan.net [Source type: General]

.However, some homographs called 多音字 (pinyin: duōyīnzì) such as 行 (pinyin: háng or xíng) (Japanese: gō, gyō) have more than one reading in Chinese representing different meanings, which is reflected in the carryover to Japanese as well.^ One of these maintains that the nature of the written language predicates this disposition, that the kanji , the Chinese ideographs, are in themselves images and are so used by the Japanese, Vietnamese, and South Koreans ( kanji are no longer used in North Korea) as well as the Chinese.
  • neomarxisme: Kanji Causes Manga: Why? 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.pliink.com [Source type: General]

^ The written Japanese and Chinese languages are composed not of individual letters but of ideographs or pictographs, which represent an idea or thing.
  • Kanjis - Common Mistakes With Kanji Tattoos 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tao-of-tattoos.com [Source type: General]

^ The popularity of kanjis in the West hasn't impressed many of those who speak or read Japanese or Chinese fluently.
  • Kanjis - Common Mistakes With Kanji Tattoos 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tao-of-tattoos.com [Source type: General]

.Additionally, many Chinese syllables, especially those with an entering tone, did not fit the largely consonant-vowel (CV) phonotactics of classical Japanese.^ The popularity of kanjis in the West hasn't impressed many of those who speak or read Japanese or Chinese fluently.
  • Kanjis - Common Mistakes With Kanji Tattoos 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tao-of-tattoos.com [Source type: General]

^ It's rather neat to see all the uses one kanji was up to over the years/Chinese classics/Japanese literature.
  • Kanji as Argo | No-sword 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC no-sword.jp [Source type: General]

^ They are skilled in classic Japanese arts such as music (especially the playing of the stringed samisen ), poetry and calligraphy.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Thus most on'yomi are composed of two morae (beats), the second of which is either a lengthening of the vowel in the first mora, the vowel i, or one of the syllables ku, ki, tsu, chi, or moraic n, chosen for their approximation to the final consonants of Middle Chinese.^ According to this FAQ , The word Kia has origins in the Chinese language with the first syllable, ki , meaning to "arise or come up out of."
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The first kanji symbol mean woam and the second one mean king in Japanese.

^ It quickly became (and remains) one of the staples of the Kabuki repertoire, and remains one of the two most popular Kabuki plays.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.It may be that palatalized consonants before vowels other than i developed in Japanese as a result of Chinese borrowings, as it is virtually unknown in words of native Japanese origin.^ Ninja is a Sino-Japanese compound derived from the two kanji (Japanese characters of Chinese origin) used to write shinobi-no-mono, one of the native Japanese words for people who practice ninjutsu (sometimes transliterated as ninjitsu).
  • Best free kanji downloads. Drill Japanese Kanji and words. Build your vocabulary with a proven system. READWRITE KANJI teaches the complete 1945 jouyou Japanese kanji characters. 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.freedownloadmanager.org [Source type: General]

^ They are even changing many chinese technical words by native-sounding compounds.
  • neomarxisme: Kanji Causes Manga: Why? 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.pliink.com [Source type: General]

^ In addition, listening to the native Japanese voice will help you understand the way the words are pronounced.
  • Read Japanese | Learn how to read real Japanese - learnhundreds of Japanese words, phrases and kanji characters 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC readjapanesefast.com [Source type: General]

.On'yomi primarily occur in multi-kanji compound words (熟語 jukugo), many of which are the result of the adoption, along with the kanji themselves, of Chinese words for concepts that either did not exist in Japanese or could not be articulated as elegantly using native words.^ They are even changing many chinese technical words by native-sounding compounds.
  • neomarxisme: Kanji Causes Manga: Why? 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.pliink.com [Source type: General]

^ Any native Japanese word or Chinese loan word can be written in hiragana .
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Native Japanese word now used in the sense of `science.'
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.This borrowing process is often compared to the English borrowings from Latin, Greek, and Norman French, since Chinese-borrowed terms are often more specialized, or considered to sound more erudite or formal, than their native counterparts.^ Yes, Japanese is typically shorter than English in practice, but that's only because the Latin font isn't as small as what it could be.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ A bit more so in English than German, in this case.
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Old English verb was céapian, and as often happens the high vowel following the k sound became a palatalization, and that ``ky'' sound evolved into the initial ch sound we have today.
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The major exception to this rule is family names, in which the native kun'yomi reading is usually used (though on'yomi are found in many personal names, especially men's names).^ I had read that many are "false" in that they do not truly mean what one is told they mean and so when I found your site, I was happy to read that you check your meanings carefully.
  • 100% Accurate Kanji Translation 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.dsfy.com [Source type: General]

^ In that case, try searching by using the KUN yomi.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ For some kanji (particularly guys like @or@ which tend to use the KUNyomi in the jukugo) I always get the KUN and ON readings mixed up .
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

Kun'yomi (Japanese reading)

.The kun'yomi (訓読み), Japanese reading, or native reading (literally, meaning reading), is a reading based on the pronunciation of a native Japanese word, or yamatokotoba, that closely approximated the meaning of the Chinese character when it was introduced.^ Any native Japanese word or Chinese loan word can be written in hiragana .
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ What confuses me constantly is the on-yomi and kun-yomi readings.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Japanese name symbols with the literal meaning .

.As with on'yomi, there can be multiple kun readings for the same kanji, and some kanji have no kun'yomi at all.^ Maybe it has the same ON yomi as that other kanji.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ LAZY : some kanji have the same ON- and KUN-yomi.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ For instance: Are there 2 kanji with the same meaning?
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

For instance, the kanji for east, , has the on reading . .However, Japanese already had two words for "east": higashi and azuma.^ However, as you might know, there are different ways to write the same word in Japanese, and it really depends on context.

^ Words and names can also be spelled out using one of two different Japanese alphabets ( hiragana and Katakana ).
  • 100% Accurate Kanji Translation 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.dsfy.com [Source type: General]

^ Two different Japanese words may sound alike, but have totally different kanji symbols.
  • 100% Accurate Kanji Translation 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.dsfy.com [Source type: General]

.Thus the kanji 東 had the latter readings added as kun'yomi.^ What confuses me constantly is the on-yomi and kun-yomi readings.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Earlier I talked about kanji ATTRIBUTES - things like ON and KUN yomis, stroke number, and radicals.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ LAZY : some kanji have the same ON- and KUN-yomi.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

.In contrast, the kanji , denoting a Chinese unit of measurement (about 30 mm or 1.2 inch), has no native Japanese equivalent; it only has an on'yomi, sun, with no native kun reading.^ What confuses me constantly is the on-yomi and kun-yomi readings.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ For example, Mandarin Chinese is only kanji.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ One of these maintains that the nature of the written language predicates this disposition, that the kanji , the Chinese ideographs, are in themselves images and are so used by the Japanese, Vietnamese, and South Koreans ( kanji are no longer used in North Korea) as well as the Chinese.
  • neomarxisme: Kanji Causes Manga: Why? 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.pliink.com [Source type: General]

.Most kokuji, Japanese-created Chinese characters, only have kun readings.^ Most japanese I know can't even read pre-war characters.
  • neomarxisme: Kanji Causes Manga: Why? 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.pliink.com [Source type: General]

^ Most teaches will tell you that you need to learn Kanji in order to read Japanese .
  • Read Japanese | Learn how to read real Japanese - learnhundreds of Japanese words, phrases and kanji characters 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC readjapanesefast.com [Source type: General]

^ Then this will be the most important message you will ever read regarding learning Japanese.
  • Read Japanese | Learn how to read real Japanese - learnhundreds of Japanese words, phrases and kanji characters 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC readjapanesefast.com [Source type: General]

Kun'yomi are characterized by the strict (C)V syllable structure of yamatokotoba. .Most noun or adjective kun'yomi are two to three syllables long, while verb kun'yomi are usually between one and three syllables in length, not counting trailing hiragana called okurigana.^ The website is called " Japanese symbol learning resource " On this learning website, you can also understand the difference between kanji, hiragana and katakana scripts.

^ Fifty-three stations (not counting the two termini), consisting of horse and porter stations, along with a range of lodging, food, etc, establishments for ordinary travellers, were established along the between the two ends, which most travelers covered on foot, usually travelling several stages per day.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ STORY : a mnemonic, usually about your (adoptive) mother, which ties the MEANING of the kanji, its ON-YOMI, and all of its RADICALS all together in one sentence.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

.Okurigana are not considered to be part of the internal reading of the character, although they are part of the reading of the word.^ OTOH kanji themselves fascinate me, so often I’ll grab Henshall‘s and read on the etymology of some character I stumbled upon, then recursively on all its constituent parts.
  • Kanji as Argo | No-sword 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC no-sword.jp [Source type: General]

^ Because then, sentences become like pictures and you just glance at them at understand the meaning of the word, rather than having to read each character if it's kana.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Learn how to read real Japanese - learn hundreds of Japanese words, phrases and kanji characters .
  • Read Japanese | Learn how to read real Japanese - learnhundreds of Japanese words, phrases and kanji characters 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC readjapanesefast.com [Source type: General]

.A beginner in the language will rarely come across characters with long readings, but readings of three or even four syllables are not uncommon.^ Most japanese I know can't even read pre-war characters.
  • neomarxisme: Kanji Causes Manga: Why? 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.pliink.com [Source type: General]

^ BACKWARDS LEARNING!@ That is to say, if you're reading a book, and come across a complex kanji you don't know.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Now, when you're reading and you come across , you'll be like, "Fuck!
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

承る .uketamawaru and 志 kokorozashi have five syllables represented by a single kanji, the longest readings of any kanji in the Jōyō character set.^ Each kanji character symbolizes a single idea.
  • neomarxisme: Kanji Causes Manga: Why? 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.pliink.com [Source type: General]

^ Memorize over 400 Kanji characters and learn their common readings .
  • Read Japanese | Learn how to read real Japanese - learnhundreds of Japanese words, phrases and kanji characters 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC readjapanesefast.com [Source type: General]

^ However below the basic translation was a "+" mark button that displayed a romaji (English character set) transliteration from the kanji.
  • translation English to Japanese Romaji - Google AJAX APIs | Google Groups 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC groups.google.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In a number of cases, multiple kanji were assigned to cover a single Japanese word.^ KUNyomi are the original, native Japanese words- what Japanese used to communicate before they imported kanji.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ If that's the case with hamburgers, how can we assume that the line between "kanji creating visual sensitivity" and manga /Japanese design culture was a straight path?
  • neomarxisme: Kanji Causes Manga: Why? 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.pliink.com [Source type: General]

^ Learn how to read real Japanese - learn hundreds of Japanese words, phrases and kanji characters .
  • Read Japanese | Learn how to read real Japanese - learnhundreds of Japanese words, phrases and kanji characters 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC readjapanesefast.com [Source type: General]

.Typically when this occurs, the different kanji refer to specific shades of meaning.^ The ONLY time the Total Cock kanji is used, is with a word that has a totally different meaning, or a totally different pronunciation, from all the other words of the kanji.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In the LOOKALIKES, I list the differing radical next to each kanji in ALL CAPS. The lookalike mnemonics go like this: meaning is underlined , and the RADICAL is in all caps.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Finally, there are many words that have the same “spellings” in hiragana but mean completely different things when seeing it in kanji.
  • Kanji Makes Japanese Easy - Dumb Otaku 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC dumbotaku.com [Source type: General]

.For instance, the word なおす, naosu, when written 治す, means "to heal an illness or sickness". When written 直す it means "to fix or correct something". Sometimes the distinction is very clear, although not always.^ Something interesting happen to me: sometimes I don’t now how they sound but I can imagine what they mean....
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The deep probing of my ability to write all the kanji I can read, and read words written with the kanji I know, has been very good for me.
  • Kanji as Argo | No-sword 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC no-sword.jp [Source type: General]

^ Since I was very young I have always been fascinated by the Japanese language, especially the written form.
  • Read Japanese | Learn how to read real Japanese - learnhundreds of Japanese words, phrases and kanji characters 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC readjapanesefast.com [Source type: General]

.Differences of opinion among reference works is not uncommon; one dictionary may say the kanji are equivalent, while another dictionary may draw distinctions of use.^ If you're trying to read a jukugo and get stuck on one of the kanji, try to think of another jukugo that uses that same kanji.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ When we do the Japanese symbol translation, we also apply different styles of Japanese kanji symbols to work with, each one unique and beautiful.

^ Jerk RADICALS mean one thing when used as a SOLO kanji, and another thing when used as a radical inside a bigger kanji.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

.As a result, native speakers of the language may have trouble knowing which kanji to use and resort to personal preference or by writing the word in hiragana.^ Hiragana Normally, when we write "respect" in Japanese, we use kanji symbols.

^ Using kanji is more respectful towards the native speakers.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Furigana : Hiragana characters written next to a kanji character to indicate Rōmaji : Literally, "Roman character"; the name for a number of systems used to write Japanese using the Latin alphabet generally used in the West.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.This latter strategy is frequently employed with more complex cases such as もと moto, which has at least five different kanji: 元, 基, 本, 下, and 素, three of which have only very subtle differences.^ The ONLY time the Total Cock kanji is used, is with a word that has a totally different meaning, or a totally different pronunciation, from all the other words of the kanji.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Put more simply, the 'simple-to-complex' method is more practical for learning all 2,000 kanji efficiently.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Once you've learned the OTHER, more USEFUL kanji of the jukugo (in this case, ''), make a flashcard of the whole jukugo, and learn r that way.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

.Local dialectical readings of kanji are also classified under kun'yomi, most notably readings for words in Ryukyuan languages.^ What confuses me constantly is the on-yomi and kun-yomi readings.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Most teaches will tell you that you need to learn Kanji in order to read Japanese .
  • Read Japanese | Learn how to read real Japanese - learnhundreds of Japanese words, phrases and kanji characters 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC readjapanesefast.com [Source type: General]

^ So, what you can do is, look up that word in my dictionary, and right under the kanji, it'll tell you the radicals that compose every part of kanji , and tell you what page of the book all the radicals are on.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

Other readings

.There are many kanji compounds that use a mixture of on'yomi and kun'yomi, known as jūbako (重箱) or yutō (湯桶) words, which are themselves examples of this kind of compound (they are autological words): the first character of jūbako is read using on'yomi, the second kun'yomi, while it is the other way around with yutō.^ What confuses me constantly is the on-yomi and kun-yomi readings.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ They used to have the Thousand Character Classic.
  • Kanji as Argo | No-sword 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC no-sword.jp [Source type: General]

^ When I was first learning Japanese one particular phenomenon I found interesting was when a Japanese/Chinese person would find strange the fact that I knew the meaning of a certain kanji and could phonetically read it (say for example the word 綺麗, which is made up of rather complex characters) but wouldn't be able to remember how to write it properly.
  • neomarxisme: Kanji Causes Manga: Why? 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.pliink.com [Source type: General]

.These are the Japanese form of hybrid words.^ Eventually, simplified forms of selected kanji were used, on an acronymic principle, to represent the basic syllables of Japanese, and these became the kana .
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Kanji also came to be used to represent native Japanese words with similar meanings (these are kun readings).
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Other examples include 場所 basho "place" (kun-on), 金色 kin'iro "golden" (on-kun) and 合気道 aikidō "the martial art Aikido" (kun-on-on).
.Some kanji also have lesser-known readings called nanori (名乗り), which are mostly used for names (often given names), and are generally closely related to the kun'yomi.^ LAZY : some kanji have the same ON- and KUN-yomi.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ What confuses me constantly is the on-yomi and kun-yomi readings.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In some cases Kanji cannot always be read directly as a symbol and sometimes has to be combined with other Kanji to make a sentence.
  • Japanese Kanji Tattoos 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.squidoo.com [Source type: General]

.Place names sometimes also use nanori or, occasionally, unique readings not found elsewhere.^ PN - PROPER NOUN - this kanji is often used in names of people or places.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Meisho-e : Meisho (literally, "place with a name") are famous locations, often with literary and historical connections, which sometimes led to standardized poetic connotations; seasonal associations were often also present.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Gikun (義訓) or jukujikun (熟字訓) are readings of kanji combinations that have no direct correspondence to the characters' individual on'yomi or kun'yomi.^ What confuses me constantly is the on-yomi and kun-yomi readings.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In some cases Kanji cannot always be read directly as a symbol and sometimes has to be combined with other Kanji to make a sentence.
  • Japanese Kanji Tattoos 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.squidoo.com [Source type: General]

^ Memorize over 400 Kanji characters and learn their common readings .
  • Read Japanese | Learn how to read real Japanese - learnhundreds of Japanese words, phrases and kanji characters 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC readjapanesefast.com [Source type: General]

.For example, 今朝 ("this morning") is read neither as *ima'asa, the kun'yomi of the characters, nor *konchō, the on'yomi of the characters.^ What confuses me constantly is the on-yomi and kun-yomi readings.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

.Instead it is read as kesa—a native Japanese word with two syllables (which may be seen as a single morpheme, or as a fusion of kyō (previously kefu), "today", and asa, "morning").^ This is exactly how I study Japanese; by reading and looking up words (and memorizing lists of words I looked up).
  • Kanji as Argo | No-sword 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC no-sword.jp [Source type: General]

^ In Japanese, there are no spaces between words, so kanji helps break words apart, making it easy to read.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Any native Japanese word or Chinese loan word can be written in hiragana .
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Many ateji (kanji used only for their phonetic value) have meanings derived from their usage: for example, the now-archaic 亜細亜 ajia was formerly used to write "Asia" in kanji; the character 亜 now means Asia in such compounds as 東亜 tōa, "East Asia". From the written 亜米利加 amerika, the second character was taken, resulting in the semi-formal coinage 米国 beikoku, which literally translates to "rice country" but means "United States of America".

When to use which reading

.Although there are general rules for when to use on'yomi and when to use kun'yomi, the language is littered with exceptions, and it is not always possible for even a native speaker to know how to read a character without prior knowledge (this is especially true for names, both of people and places).^ What confuses me constantly is the on-yomi and kun-yomi readings.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Chinese characters is a big part of learning the language for both native speakers and outsiders" .
  • neomarxisme: Kanji Causes Manga: Why? 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.pliink.com [Source type: General]

^ Most japanese I know can't even read pre-war characters.
  • neomarxisme: Kanji Causes Manga: Why? 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.pliink.com [Source type: General]

.The rule of thumb is that kanji occurring in isolation, such as a character representing a single word unit, are typically read using their kun'yomi (though there are numerous exceptions).^ What confuses me constantly is the on-yomi and kun-yomi readings.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ When a kanji represents such a word, it is said to have an on reading.
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Each kanji character symbolizes a single idea.
  • neomarxisme: Kanji Causes Manga: Why? 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.pliink.com [Source type: General]

They may be written with okurigana to mark the inflected ending of a verb or adjective, or by convention. For example: 情け nasake "sympathy", 赤い akai "red", 新しい atarashii "new ", 見る miru "(to) see", 必ず kanarazu "invariably". Okurigana is an important aspect of kanji usage in Japanese; see that article for more information on kun'yomi orthography
.Kanji occurring in compounds are generally read using on'yomi, called 熟語 jukugo in Japanese (though again, exceptions abound).^ Furigana : Hiragana characters written next to a kanji character to indicate Rōmaji : Literally, "Roman character"; the name for a number of systems used to write Japanese using the Latin alphabet generally used in the West.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ If you're trying to read a jukugo and get stuck on one of the kanji, try to think of another jukugo that uses that same kanji.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Another book called "Orthographic Systems" (ISBN 4870432110) is exceptionally useful.
  • Kanji as Argo | No-sword 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC no-sword.jp [Source type: General]

For example, 情報 jōhō "information", 学校 gakkō "school", and 新幹線 shinkansen "bullet train" all follow this pattern. .This isolated kanji versus compound distinction gives words for similar concepts completely different pronunciations.^ Kanji gives meaning to words.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Many kanji characters are similar to each other, and some can have different meanings depending on context .
  • 100% Accurate Kanji Translation 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.dsfy.com [Source type: General]

^ The ONLY time the Total Cock kanji is used, is with a word that has a totally different meaning, or a totally different pronunciation, from all the other words of the kanji.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

."east" and 北 "north" use the kun readings higashi and kita, being stand-alone characters, while 北東 "northeast", as a compound, uses the on reading hokutō.^ For some kanji (particularly guys like @or@ which tend to use the KUNyomi in the jukugo) I always get the KUN and ON readings mixed up .
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Kanji also came to be used to represent native Japanese words with similar meanings (these are kun readings).
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.This is further complicated by the fact that many kanji have more than one on'yomi: 生 is read as sei in 先生 sensei "teacher" but as shō in 一生 isshō "one's whole life". Meaning can also be an important indicator of reading; 易 is read i when it means "simple", but as eki when it means "divination", both being on'yomi for this character.^ Kanji with complicated shapes 2) Kanji comprised of several components 3) independent characters which both express a meaning by themselves and play an important role in forming other words 4) the combination of Kanji and Hiragana or Katakana in written language 5) characters with several different readings and meanings.> p> To deal with the areas of difficulty outlined above, it is necessary to give systematic explanations of Kanji as they are presented and to set an attainable goal by selecting a minimum number of basic Kanji for students to memorize.
  • A Basic Kanji Book Volume 1 :: Kanji Books :: Japanese Bookstore :: TheJapanShop.com 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.thejapanshop.com [Source type: General]

^ When I was first learning Japanese one particular phenomenon I found interesting was when a Japanese/Chinese person would find strange the fact that I knew the meaning of a certain kanji and could phonetically read it (say for example the word 綺麗, which is made up of rather complex characters) but wouldn't be able to remember how to write it properly.
  • neomarxisme: Kanji Causes Manga: Why? 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.pliink.com [Source type: General]

^ Ehhhh クリス Don't know how many are used in Japanese, but the book I'm using to study kanji provides 1,945 commonly used characters, 1,006 of which are the ones taught in the six years of elementary school.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

These rules of thumb have many exceptions. .Kun'yomi compound words are not as numerous as those with on'yomi, but neither are they rare.^ They are even changing many chinese technical words by native-sounding compounds.
  • neomarxisme: Kanji Causes Manga: Why? 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.pliink.com [Source type: General]

^ Even though they know damn well you won't use those words!!
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ And learning those compound words is way easier if you just memorized the component kanji yesterday!
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

.Examples include 手紙 tegami "letter", 日傘 higasa "parasol", and the famous 神風 kamikaze "divine wind". Such compounds may also have okurigana, such as 空揚げ (also written 唐揚げ) karaage "Chinese-style fried chicken" and 折り紙 origami, although many of these can also be written with the okurigana omitted (for example, 空揚 or 折紙).^ Of course, these epure Japanese' words were written in Chinese, but whatever.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ For example, English often used -ick for the ending now written -ic, and German had cees in many words where kays (and some zees) now appear.
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Absent the original historical context, reasonable alternative translations of kamikaze would include `demon wind' and `demonic wind.'
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Similarly, some on'yomi characters can also be used as words in isolation: 愛 ai "love", 禅 Zen, 点 ten "mark, dot". Most of these cases involve kanji that have no kun'yomi, so there can be no confusion, although exceptions do occur.^ There are 1945 Kanji with these numbers (i.e.

^ LAZY : some kanji have the same ON- and KUN-yomi.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ What confuses me constantly is the on-yomi and kun-yomi readings.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

.A lone 金 may be read as kin "gold" or as kane "money, metal"; only context can determine the writer's intended reading and meaning.^ Instead, is only used in the context of îj which is pronounced totally differently and means 'yesterday.'
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

.Multiple readings have given rise to a number of homographs, in some cases having different meanings depending on how they are read.^ We also must mention that there are some explanations given in this material which are in fact differ from the actual derivation of a certain Kanji or radical.
  • A Basic Kanji Book Volume 1 :: Kanji Books :: Japanese Bookstore :: TheJapanShop.com 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.thejapanshop.com [Source type: General]

^ I had read that many are "false" in that they do not truly mean what one is told they mean and so when I found your site, I was happy to read that you check your meanings carefully.
  • 100% Accurate Kanji Translation 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.dsfy.com [Source type: General]

^ They forget that they had primary school and senior school,12 years, to learn kanji and how to read.
  • Read Japanese | Learn how to read real Japanese - learnhundreds of Japanese words, phrases and kanji characters 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC readjapanesefast.com [Source type: General]

.One example is 上手, which can be read in three different ways: jōzu (skilled), uwate (upper part), or kamite (upper part).^ Still, there's no way to make bigger KB's from tools and parts, unless one of the tools is a blowtorch.
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Words in Japanese can be written three different ways.
  • 100% Accurate Kanji Translation 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.dsfy.com [Source type: General]

^ While these learning materials do help, I have yet to encounter one that teaches Japanese the way it is actually spoken and read the way Nick and Kaoru do.
  • Read Japanese | Learn how to read real Japanese - learnhundreds of Japanese words, phrases and kanji characters 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC readjapanesefast.com [Source type: General]

In addition, 上手い has the reading umai (skilled). Furigana is often used to clarify any potential ambiguities.
As stated above, 重箱 jūbako and 湯桶 yutō readings are also not uncommon. Indeed, all four combinations of reading are possible: on-on, kun-kun, kun-on and on-kun.
.Some famous place names, including those of Tokyo (東京 Tōkyō) and Japan itself (日本 Nihon or sometimes Nippon) are read with on'yomi; however, the majority of Japanese place names are read with kun'yomi: 大阪 Ōsaka, 青森 Aomori, 箱根 Hakone.^ What confuses me constantly is the on-yomi and kun-yomi readings.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ For anyone wanting to live and work in Japan, the ability to read Japanese is very important, but not necessarily so easy.
  • Read Japanese | Learn how to read real Japanese - learnhundreds of Japanese words, phrases and kanji characters 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC readjapanesefast.com [Source type: General]

^ If you want to learn kanji, it's because you want to read Japanese text of some sort.
  • Kanji as Argo | No-sword 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC no-sword.jp [Source type: General]

.When characters are used as abbreviations of place names, their reading may not match that in the original.^ PN - PROPER NOUN - this kanji is often used in names of people or places.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The purely denotative translation method focus solely on preserving themeaning of the original English name, but it is NOT appropriate to use this method for writing names in Japanese symbols.

^ Japan ese name for Chinese (Han) logographic characters used in writing Japanese.
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The Osaka (大阪) and Kobe (神戸) baseball team, the Hanshin (阪神) Tigers, take their name from the on'yomi of the second kanji of Ōsaka and the first of Kōbe.^ The first kanji symbol means Wind, the second kanji symbol means wood, the third kanji symbol means fire, and the kast kanji symbol means mountain in Japanese.

^ The first kanji symbol mean woam and the second one mean king in Japanese.

.The name of the Keisei (京成) railway line, linking Tokyo (東京) and Narita (成田) is formed similarly, although the reading of 京 from 東京 is kei, despite kyō already being an on'yomi in the word Tōkyō.^ Learn to read the Katakana syllabary, and pronounce words or phrases without being misunderstood .
  • Read Japanese | Learn how to read real Japanese - learnhundreds of Japanese words, phrases and kanji characters 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC readjapanesefast.com [Source type: General]

^ In other words, in my system, not only does every part of g have a name, but by the time we get to g, you will already have LEARNED all the parts, and so learning g will be easy!
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

.Family names are also usually read with kun'yomi: 山田 Yamada, 田中 Tanaka, 鈴木 Suzuki.^ What confuses me constantly is the on-yomi and kun-yomi readings.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

.Given names, although they are not typically considered jūbako or yutō, often contain mixtures of kun'yomi, on'yomi and nanori: 大助 Daisuke [on-kun], 夏美 Natsumi [kun-on].^ The name of the protocol, although often (and originally) written in all-caps, is not really an acronym.
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Being chosen at the discretion of the parents, the readings of given names do not follow any set rules and it is impossible to know with certainty how to read a person's name without independent verification.^ I read somewhere (the Yookoso textbook, I think) that by high school graduation, a Japanese person must know at least (almost 2,000 kanji).
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Not having memorized every possible reading for a given set of kanji doesn't affect the badness of your ass in the slightest, in my opinion.
  • Kanji as Argo | No-sword 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC no-sword.jp [Source type: General]

^ Learn to read the Katakana syllabary, and pronounce words or phrases without being misunderstood .
  • Read Japanese | Learn how to read real Japanese - learnhundreds of Japanese words, phrases and kanji characters 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC readjapanesefast.com [Source type: General]

.Parents can be quite creative, and rumours abound of children called 地球 Āsu and 天使 Enjeru, quite literally "Earth" and "Angel"; neither are common names, and have normal readings chikyū and tenshi respectively.^ Waka : Literally "Japanese poem"; so named because it referred to the original indigenous poetic form of Japan, as distinguished from the Chinese imports so common in Japan.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Common patterns do exist, however, allowing experienced readers to make a good guess for most names.^ More good news: Compound words are the MOST LOGICAL part of kanji: if you know the component kanji, you can easily guess both the pronunciation AND the meaning of a compound word .
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Good adult style, however, demands the use kanji for most content.
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ I take the most common meaning and make it the English keyword for that kanji.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

Pronunciation assistance

.Because of the ambiguities involved, kanji sometimes have their pronunciation for the given context spelled out in ruby characters known as furigana, (small kana written above or to the right of the character) or kumimoji (small kana written in-line after the character).^ Furigana : Hiragana characters written next to a kanji character to indicate Rōmaji : Literally, "Roman character"; the name for a number of systems used to write Japanese using the Latin alphabet generally used in the West.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Because then, sentences become like pictures and you just glance at them at understand the meaning of the word, rather than having to read each character if it's kana.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ If you think about it, Japanses also started out being written as only the Chinese characters for the aristocratic men.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

This is especially true in texts for children or foreign learners and manga (comics). .It is also used in newspapers for rare or unusual readings and for characters not included in the officially recognized set of essential kanji.^ Memorize over 400 Kanji characters and learn their common readings .
  • Read Japanese | Learn how to read real Japanese - learnhundreds of Japanese words, phrases and kanji characters 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC readjapanesefast.com [Source type: General]

^ However below the basic translation was a "+" mark button that displayed a romaji (English character set) transliteration from the kanji.
  • translation English to Japanese Romaji - Google AJAX APIs | Google Groups 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC groups.google.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Lately I write kanji so rarely that I get stuck on even ones that should be very simple, even though I can read just about any one (except proper names) that appears in a newspaper or modern book.
  • neomarxisme: Kanji Causes Manga: Why? 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.pliink.com [Source type: General]

Total number of kanji

The number of possible characters is disputed. .The Daikanwa Jiten contains about 50,000 characters, and this was thought to be comprehensive, but more recent mainland Chinese dictionaries, such as the Yiti Zidian dictionary published in 2004 contain 100,000 or more characters,[citation needed] many consisting of obscure variants.^ If you think about it, Japanses also started out being written as only the Chinese characters for the aristocratic men.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Overcome - Japanese symbols Objective - Japanese symbols For more information about Japanese symbols, please visit Takanori Tomita's 100% accurate Japanese symbols translation website.

^ For more information about Japanese symbols and if you are looking for 100% Accurate Japanese symbols Translation Labels: Haiku , Japanese symbols , kanji , translation .

.The vast majority of these are not in common use in either Japan or China; as discussed below, approximately 2,000 to 3,000 characters are in common use in Japan.^ Japan ese name for Chinese (Han) logographic characters used in writing Japanese.
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Chinese characters arrived in Japan carrying Chinese literature, and for a while that's mainly what they were used for.
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Some of these words are the most common and useful in Japanese, and yet most people will never ever say them.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

Orthographic reform and lists of kanji

.In 1946, following World War II, the Japanese government instituted a series of orthographic reforms.^ The first ``King's College'' in the New World was founded in 1756 in New York City , chartered by King George II. After the Revolutionary War, that school was reorganized as Columbia College.
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Largely untouched during World War II, it is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, with many beautiful original temples and palaces.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.This was done with the goal of facilitating learning for children and simplifying kanji use in literature and periodicals.^ Eventually, simplified forms of selected kanji were used, on an acronymic principle, to represent the basic syllables of Japanese, and these became the kana .
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Here is why you need to learn kanji, and have to use it.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ It's rather neat to see all the uses one kanji was up to over the years/Chinese classics/Japanese literature.
  • Kanji as Argo | No-sword 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC no-sword.jp [Source type: General]

The number of characters in circulation was reduced, and formal lists of characters to be learned during each grade of school were established. Some characters were given simplified glyphs, called 新字体 (shinjitai). Many variant forms of characters and obscure alternatives for common characters were officially discouraged.
.These are simply guidelines, so many characters outside these standards are still widely known and commonly used; these are known as hyōgaiji (表外字?).^ Ehhhh クリス Don't know how many are used in Japanese, but the book I'm using to study kanji provides 1,945 commonly used characters, 1,006 of which are the ones taught in the six years of elementary school.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Kaisho : The standard form of kanji characters, used in printed materials, etc.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Kyōiku kanji

.The Kyōiku kanji 教育漢字 ("education kanji") are 1006 characters that Japanese children learn in elementary school.^ P Xhilononi234 かんじはたのしいです。かじで読むのとかなで読むのとでは、かなで読むよりかんじで読む方がやさしいです。でも、もしかんじは分からないのなら、このかんじはつかいません。 Also, according to the Wakan program (electronic dictionary/learning tool for Chinese and Japanese), There have been 6,355 kanji found and 18,522 traditional Chinese characters found.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Ehhhh クリス Don't know how many are used in Japanese, but the book I'm using to study kanji provides 1,945 commonly used characters, 1,006 of which are the ones taught in the six years of elementary school.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Under the translation you will see a line: English to Japanese translation + Show romanization The "Show romanization" performs a transliteration from kanji to roman characters.
  • translation English to Japanese Romaji - Google AJAX APIs | Google Groups 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC groups.google.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The number was 881 until 1981. The grade-level breakdown of the education kanji is known as the Gakunen-betsu kanji haitōhyō (学年別漢字配当表), or the gakushū kanji.^ I thought I was pretty badass after reading Snow Country in the original, until I humbly realized I couldn't come up with all of the readings for all the the kanji in freaking level ten .
  • Kanji as Argo | No-sword 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC no-sword.jp [Source type: General]

Jōyō kanji

.The Jōyō kanji 常用漢字 are 1,945 characters consisting of all the Kyōiku kanji, plus an additional 939 kanji taught in junior high and high school.^ Ehhhh クリス Don't know how many are used in Japanese, but the book I'm using to study kanji provides 1,945 commonly used characters, 1,006 of which are the ones taught in the six years of elementary school.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ I read somewhere (the Yookoso textbook, I think) that by high school graduation, a Japanese person must know at least (almost 2,000 kanji).
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ OTOH kanji themselves fascinate me, so often I’ll grab Henshall‘s and read on the etymology of some character I stumbled upon, then recursively on all its constituent parts.
  • Kanji as Argo | No-sword 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC no-sword.jp [Source type: General]

In publishing, characters outside this category are often given furigana. .The Jōyō kanji were introduced in 1981. They replaced an older list of 1,850 characters known as the General-use kanji (tōyō kanji 当用漢字) introduced in 1946. The Japanese National Kanji Conference will add new characters to the list, to be enforced by 2010[4].^ They used to have the Thousand Character Classic.
  • Kanji as Argo | No-sword 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC no-sword.jp [Source type: General]

^ They are written in Japanese kanji symbols.

^ Furigana : Hiragana characters written next to a kanji character to indicate Rōmaji : Literally, "Roman character"; the name for a number of systems used to write Japanese using the Latin alphabet generally used in the West.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Some of these new characters are currently Jinmeiyō kanji and were previously not included in the Jōyō kanji.^ OTOH kanji themselves fascinate me, so often I’ll grab Henshall‘s and read on the etymology of some character I stumbled upon, then recursively on all its constituent parts.
  • Kanji as Argo | No-sword 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC no-sword.jp [Source type: General]

^ Our customers have sent us new Japanese kanji symbol tattoo design photos to us, and some of the testimonials.

^ Many kanji characters are similar to each other, and some can have different meanings depending on context .
  • 100% Accurate Kanji Translation 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.dsfy.com [Source type: General]

.Some of the characers are used to write prefecture names: 阪,熊,奈,岡,鹿,梨,阜,埼,茨,栃 and 媛.^ The purely denotative translation method focus solely on preserving themeaning of the original English name, but it is NOT appropriate to use this method for writing names in Japanese symbols.

^ Japan ese name for Chinese (Han) logographic characters used in writing Japanese.
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Jinmeiyō kanji

.Since September 27, 2004, the Jinmeiyō kanji 人名用漢字 consist of 2,928 characters, containing the Jōyō kanji plus an additional 983 kanji found in people's names.^ PN - PROPER NOUN - this kanji is often used in names of people or places.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Sōsho : Literally, "grass style"; an extremely stylized and fluid form of kanji characters, found in hand-written material.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Radical : Radicals are multi-stroke elements which appear in numerous characters; any given kanji character is usually composed of a base radical, and additional strokes and/or radicals.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.There were only 92 kanji in the original list published in 1952, but new additions have been made frequently.^ I saw a page where not only was the English to Japanese kanji translation made but that there was ALSO a Romaji transliteration available from that kanji.
  • translation English to Japanese Romaji - Google AJAX APIs | Google Groups 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC groups.google.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ After you've learned all the kanji - ONLY THEN do I teach you a new radical.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ If you don't have time right there and then, at least write that kanji down once on a "list of kanji I fucked up on while reading this bookh .
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

.Sometimes the phrase Jinmeiyō kanji refers to all 2,928, and sometimes it only refers to the 983 that are only used for names.^ There's over 5,000 of them, but most of them are only used in people's names.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ These reign names, which are also used to name eras in Japanese history, are referred to as nengō .
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The ONLY time the Total Cock kanji is used, is with a word that has a totally different meaning, or a totally different pronunciation, from all the other words of the kanji.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

Jinmeiyō kanji literally translates to "Chinese characters for use in personal names".

Hyōgaiji

Hyōgaiji (表外字 "unlisted characters"?) are any kanji not contained in the jōyō kanji and jinmeiyō kanji lists. .These are generally written using traditional characters, but extended shinjitai forms exist.^ Furigana : Hiragana characters written next to a kanji character to indicate Rōmaji : Literally, "Roman character"; the name for a number of systems used to write Japanese using the Latin alphabet generally used in the West.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Eventually, simplified forms of selected kanji were used, on an acronymic principle, to represent the basic syllables of Japanese, and these became the kana .
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Kaisho : The standard form of kanji characters, used in printed materials, etc.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Japanese Industrial Standards for kanji

.The Japanese Industrial Standards for kanji and kana define character code-points for each kanji and kana, as well as other forms of writing such as the Latin alphabet, Cyrillic alphabet, Greek alphabet, Hindu-Arabic numerals, etc.^ Kaisho : The standard form of kanji characters, used in printed materials, etc.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Furigana : Hiragana characters written next to a kanji character to indicate Rōmaji : Literally, "Roman character"; the name for a number of systems used to write Japanese using the Latin alphabet generally used in the West.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Eventually, simplified forms of selected kanji were used, on an acronymic principle, to represent the basic syllables of Japanese, and these became the kana .
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

for use in information processing. They have had numerous revisions. The current standards are:
  • JIS X 0208:1997, the most recent version of the main standard. It has 6,355 kanji.
  • JIS X 0212:1990, a supplementary standard containing a further 5,801 kanji. This standard is rarely used, mainly because the common Shift JIS encoding system could not use it. This standard is effectively obsolete;
  • JIS X 0213:2000, a further revision which extended the JIS X 0208 set with 3,625 additional kanji, of which 2,741 were in JIS X 0212. The standard is in part designed to be compatible with Shift JIS encoding;
  • JIS X 0221:1995, the Japanese version of the ISO 10646/Unicode standard.

Gaiji

.Gaiji (外字), literally meaning "external characters", are kanji that are not represented in existing Japanese encoding systems.^ Japanese name symbols with the literal meaning .

^ Kanji characters can be used to represent an entire object, idea or meaning.
  • 100% Accurate Kanji Translation 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.dsfy.com [Source type: General]

^ Furigana : Hiragana characters written next to a kanji character to indicate Rōmaji : Literally, "Roman character"; the name for a number of systems used to write Japanese using the Latin alphabet generally used in the West.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.These include variant forms of common kanji that need to be represented alongside the more conventional glyph in reference works, and can include non-kanji symbols as well.^ Eventually, simplified forms of selected kanji were used, on an acronymic principle, to represent the basic syllables of Japanese, and these became the kana .
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ When we do the Japanese symbol translation, we also apply different styles of Japanese kanji symbols to work with, each one unique and beautiful.

^ Lindsey For more information about Japanese symbols and kanji tattoo design pictures , please click the link.

Gaiji can be either user-defined characters or system-specific characters. .Both are a problem for information interchange, as the codepoint used to represent an external character will not be consistent from one computer or operating system to another.^ On this site, you will find a great information about Japanese writing system and calligraphy designs used as tattoo tribals and design.

^ Kanji characters can be used to represent an entire object, idea or meaning.
  • 100% Accurate Kanji Translation 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.dsfy.com [Source type: General]

^ Harmonices'' is the genitive singular of the Greek word ``harmonicê'' (``ê'' is used to represent a long Greek ee in Latin characters, i.e.
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Gaiji were nominally prohibited in JIS X 0208-1997, and JIS X 0213-2000 used the range of code-points previously allocated to gaiji, making them completely unusable.^ I completely agree with you St. When ever I e-mail my homestay mother, even if I don't know the kanji, I still make sure to use them for her sake.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

.Nevertheless, they persist today with NTT DoCoMo's "i-mode" service, where they are used for emoji (pictorial characters).^ I mean, yes, japanese could stop using characters, but in order to stop doing so they might as well make a different language.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ (She's from Taiwan where they still use traditional characters...
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Kanji : Literally, "Chinese character" (from "Han" for Chinese); the original characters used to write Japanese, they are derived from Chinese originals, and usually very similar (if not identical) to them.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Unicode allows for optional encoding of gaiji in private use areas, while Adobe's SING (Smart INdependent Glyphlets)[5][6] technology allows the creation of customized gaiji.^ Iro-ban or Colour-block : The blocks carved later in the process of creating a woodblock print; they are used to prints the areas of solid colour.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The Text Encoding Initiative uses a <g> element to encode any non-standard character or glyph, including gaiji.^ Kaisho : The standard form of kanji characters, used in printed materials, etc.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

[7] (The g stands for "gaiji".[8])

Types of Kanji: by category

A Chinese scholar Xu Shen (許慎), in the Shuōwén Jiězì (說文解字) ca. .100 CE, classified Chinese characters into six categories (Japanese: 六書 rikusho).^ Japan ese name for Chinese (Han) logographic characters used in writing Japanese.
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Kanji : Literally, "Chinese character" (from "Han" for Chinese); the original characters used to write Japanese, they are derived from Chinese originals, and usually very similar (if not identical) to them.
  • Woodblock Print Terms 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC mercury.lcs.mit.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Anyway, the decision to force the square peg of Chinese characters in the round hole of the existing Japanese language leads to some really janky situations!
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

.The traditional classification is still taught but is problematic and no longer the focus of modern lexicographic practice, as some categories are not clearly defined, nor are they mutually exclusive: the first four refer to structural composition, while the last two refer to usage.^ In Japanese, those Japanese symbols mean "Monster come out" or "Monster debut", and they are called "Kai Jyu De byu" The first 2 Japanese symbols are kanji, and the last 3 symbols are katakana.

^ In Modern German, the cluster of senses around `clever' stopped being expressed by the word karg, and the senses around `parsimonious' generalized so they no longer referred primarily to money.
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.(For a table of all the kyōiku kanji (教育漢字) broken down by category see this page, from which the above description has been extracted.^ So, what you can do is, look up that word in my dictionary, and right under the kanji, it'll tell you the radicals that compose every part of kanji , and tell you what page of the book all the radicals are on.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ PK means 'PRIMARY KANJI' : this is exactly what it sounds like - a kanji that can't be broken down into radicals.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

)

Shōkei-moji (象形文字)

.These characters are pictograms, sketches of the object they represent.^ Kanji characters can be used to represent an entire object, idea or meaning.
  • 100% Accurate Kanji Translation 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.dsfy.com [Source type: General]

^ Each Kanji character represents an entire object, idea, or meaning in a visually expressive way.
  • 100% Accurate Kanji Translation 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.dsfy.com [Source type: General]

^ I have two friends who teach the Japanese language and they confirmed your 100% accuracy on these characters.
  • 100% Accurate Kanji Translation 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.dsfy.com [Source type: General]

.For example, 目 is an eye, 木 is a tree, etc.^ For example, tree ؁Awater A and mountain R.As you'd expect, primary kanji are often radicals of other kanji - XA@ÁAD,etc.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

(Shōkei 象形 is also the Japanese word for Egyptian hieroglyphs). .The current forms of the characters are very different from the original, and it is now hard to see the origin in many of these characters.^ Many kanji characters are similar to each other, and some can have different meanings depending on context .
  • 100% Accurate Kanji Translation 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.dsfy.com [Source type: General]

It is somewhat easier to see in seal script. These make up a small fraction of modern characters.

Shiji-moji (指事文字)

.Shiji-moji are ideograms, often called "simple ideograms" or "simple indicatives" to distinguish and tell the difference them from compound ideograms (below).^ Languages that use a lot of different declensions often use a separate noun declension called the partitive to express the idea that English expresses by some or any .
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.They are usually simple graphically and represent an abstract concept such as 上 "up" or "above" and 下 "down" or "below". These make up a tiny fraction of modern characters.^ But, 1) The thought of 1,000 students spending 2,000 hours making up 3,000 stories each, and then forgetting them all after they learn/give up on Japanese, is just sad to me.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Below that is a list of all the radicals that make up the kanji.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

Kaii-moji (会意文字)

.These are compound ideograms, often called "compound indicatives", "associative compounds", or just "ideograms". These are usually a combination of pictograms that combine iconicly to present an overall meaning.^ And, the good news is that kanji is just the same: Jukugo (compound words) basically shriek their meaning at you.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Just try to associate the kanji with its meaning and its component radicals; if you can do that you are rad.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

An example is the kokuji 峠 (mountain pass) made from 山 (mountain), 上 (up) and 下 (down). Another is 休 (rest) from 人 (person) and 木 (tree). These make up a tiny fraction of modern characters.

Keisei-moji (形声文字)

.These phono-semantic or radical-phonetic compounds, sometimes called "semantic-phonetic", "semasio-phonetic", or "phonetic-ideographic" characters, are by far the largest category, making up about 90% of characters.^ Often, these simple-kanji-which-are-used-in-bigger-kanji are also SWELL RADICALS - kanji with a tree in them have to do with wooden things, kanji with fire in them are about fire, etc.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Then there is a list of the 2 radicals that make up sweat .
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Say all the radicals' keywords aloud a few times - maybe that'll make the mnemonic pop up in your memory.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

.Typically they are made up of two components, one of which suggests the general category of the meaning or semantic context, and the other approximates the pronunciation.^ The ONLY time the Total Cock kanji is used, is with a word that has a totally different meaning, or a totally different pronunciation, from all the other words of the kanji.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ KANJI THEMSELVES, even complex ones, can be radicals- if they wind up inside a bigger kanji!
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ But if you're READING two homophones, the kanji are really helpful in clearing up the meaning -@ (Chinese + Letter) can only mean 'chinese characters', while (main office+ action) means 'someone who does actions at the main office,' in other words, a secretary.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

.(The pronunciation really relates to the original Chinese, and may now only be distantly detectable in the modern Japanese on'yomi of the kanji.^ For example, Mandarin Chinese is only kanji.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ KUNyomi are the original, native Japanese words- what Japanese used to communicate before they imported kanji.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ All the short-cuts, 'only-in-Japanese' problems,and hidden patterns in kanji that I discovered.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

.The same is true of the semantic context, which may have changed over the centuries or in the transition from Chinese to Japanese.^ In other words, the homophones largely result from Japanese people trying to speak Chinese without tones - which I complained about earlier in the Historical Context Rant.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ According to Google, the shit came over in the 5th century, because Japanese traders needed to communicate with their Korean and Chinese counterparts.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

As a result, it is a common error in folk etymology to fail to recognize a phono-semantic compound, typically instead inventing a compound-indicative explanation.)
As examples of this, consider the kanji with the 言 shape: 語, 記, 訳, 説, etc. .All are related to word/language/meaning.^ The ONLY time the Total Cock kanji is used, is with a word that has a totally different meaning, or a totally different pronunciation, from all the other words of the kanji.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ According to this FAQ , The word Kia has origins in the Chinese language with the first syllable, ki , meaning to "arise or come up out of."
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ This and the French word coupe, the word copa in Spanish and Portuguese, and coppa in Italian all have about the same meaning and are all derived from the Late Latin word cuppa, also meaning `cup.'
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Similarly kanji with the 雨 (rain) shape (雲, 電, 雷, 雪, 霜, etc.^ This despite the fact that the upper-right part appears in exactly the same shape and position in over 10 other kanji (AABAAÁÁA@etc.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

) are almost invariably related to weather. .Kanji with the 寺 (temple) shape on the right (詩, 持, 時, 侍, etc.^ This despite the fact that the upper-right part appears in exactly the same shape and position in over 10 other kanji (AABAAÁÁA@etc.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

) usually have an .on'yomi of "shi" or "ji". Sometimes one can guess the meaning and/or reading simply from the components.^ I had read that many are "false" in that they do not truly mean what one is told they mean and so when I found your site, I was happy to read that you check your meanings carefully.
  • 100% Accurate Kanji Translation 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.dsfy.com [Source type: General]

^ More good news: Compound words are the MOST LOGICAL part of kanji: if you know the component kanji, you can easily guess both the pronunciation AND the meaning of a compound word .
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ STORY : a mnemonic, usually about your (adoptive) mother, which ties the MEANING of the kanji, its ON-YOMI, and all of its RADICALS all together in one sentence.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

However, exceptions do exist — for example, neither 需 nor 霊 have anything to do with weather (at least in their modern usage), and 待 has an on'yomi of "tai". That is, a component may play a semantic role in one compound, but a phonetic role in another.

Tenchū-moji (転注文字)

This group have variously been called "derivative characters", "derivative cognates", or translated as "mutually explanatory" or "mutually synonymous" characters; this is the most problematic of the six categories, as it is vaguely defined. .It may refer to kanji where the meaning or application has become extended.^ Even though some kanji meanings get distorted throughout the years they may not only have similar meanings, but also similar enunciations.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

For example, 楽 is used for 'music' and 'comfort, ease', with different pronunciations in Chinese reflected in the two different on'yomi, gaku 'music' and raku 'pleasure'.

Kasha-moji (仮借文字)

.These are rebuses, sometimes called "phonetic loans". The etymology of the characters follows one of the patterns above, but the present-day meaning is completely unrelated to this.^ These are what I call the 'duplicate kanji'for instance, dAłA and are all pronounced , and they all mean HARD. .
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ One hesitates to call these ``official epithets,'' because in an extreme totalitarian dictatorship, there is little space for the unofficial.
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ A Japan ese word that means: One of the characters in the Japanese syllabaries.
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.A character was appropriated to represent a similar sounding word.^ This is something like homograph ambiguity in English, except that the words that fail to be distinguished are not words with (probably) similar sound but words with similar meaning.
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Kanji also came to be used to represent native Japanese words with similar meanings (these are kun readings).
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Harmonices'' is the genitive singular of the Greek word ``harmonicê'' (``ê'' is used to represent a long Greek ee in Latin characters, i.e.
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.For example, 来 in ancient Chinese was originally a pictograph for "wheat". Its syllable was homophonous with the verb meaning "to come", and the character is used for that verb as a result, without any embellishing "meaning" element attached.^ According to this FAQ , The word Kia has origins in the Chinese language with the first syllable, ki , meaning to "arise or come up out of."
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ You know, even going through this, countries that use chinese characters have some of the highest literacy rates in the world.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ I mean, yes, japanese could stop using characters, but in order to stop doing so they might as well make a different language.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

.The character for wheat 麦, originally meant "to come", being a Keisei-moji having 'foot' at the bottom for its meaning part and "wheat" at the top for sound.^ Because then, sentences become like pictures and you just glance at them at understand the meaning of the word, rather than having to read each character if it's kana.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ According to this FAQ , The word Kia has origins in the Chinese language with the first syllable, ki , meaning to "arise or come up out of."
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ A kanji may have 4 or 5 KUNyomi, and it may be part of dozens and dozens of jukugo, but it will only have one bottom-radical, only one left-side radical, only one top-radical, and they only have one ONyomi.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

.The two characters swapped meaning, so today the more common word has the simpler character.^ If a word has only one or two jukugo, that means that in practice, it's only ever used with one or two jukugo!
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Thus, the single word kana must mean both `syllabary character' and `syllabary characters.'
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ (Yeah, I'm going by ghits of German pages, and yes, the more common forms appear on pages where the word is almost always a surname.
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.This borrowing of sounds has a very long history.^ Very conveniently, this letter has the same sound in Italian as "ch", and it tends to be used for words borrowed from foreign languages.
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Related symbols

.The iteration mark (々) is used to indicate that the preceding kanji is to be repeated, functioning similarly to a ditto mark in English.^ However below the basic translation was a "+" mark button that displayed a romaji (English character set) transliteration from the kanji.
  • translation English to Japanese Romaji - Google AJAX APIs | Google Groups 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC groups.google.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Just as Japanese people love to use English symbols and phrases on T-shirt, logo or tattoo design, westerners have started using Japanese Kanji Symbols for their own design needs.
  • 100% Accurate Kanji Translation 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.dsfy.com [Source type: General]

.It is pronounced as though the kanji were written twice in a row, for example 色々 (iroiro "various") and 時々 (tokidoki "sometimes").^ Even if I can't remember how to pronounce a kanji sometimes, I still know what it means.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Here is an example and what it looks like This is a family crest with name, oda, written in kanji symbols.

This mark also appears in personal and place names, as in the surname Sasaki (佐々木). .This symbol is a simplified version of the kanji 仝 (variant of 同 dō "same").^ If the number of kanji symbols in your translation is too long for your intended use, we will try to re-create a new design using fewer symbols with the same meaning.
  • 100% Accurate Kanji Translation 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.dsfy.com [Source type: General]

^ Although there are many ways to write the same word in Japanese kanji, today's Japanese kanji symbol is often used in books, or magazines, especially with the historical story.

.Another frequently used symbol is ヶ (a small katakana "ke"), pronounced "ka" when used to indicate quantity (such as 六ヶ月, rokkagetsu "six months") or "ga" in place names like Kasumigaseki (霞ヶ関).^ On this blog, you will see the Japanese symbols such as non smorking sign in Japan, button used in a elavator, Japanese symbols used in a Japanese books, magazines, and newspapers.

^ Words and names can also be spelled out using one of two different Japanese alphabets ( hiragana and Katakana ).
  • 100% Accurate Kanji Translation 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.dsfy.com [Source type: General]

^ PN - PROPER NOUN - this kanji is often used in names of people or places.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

This symbol is a simplified version of the kanji 箇.

Radical-and-stroke sorting

.Kanji, whose thousands of symbols defy ordering by convention such as is used with the Roman Alphabet, uses radical-and-stroke sorting to order a list of Kanji words.^ In other words, radicals are the ABCs of kanji.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Radicals , such as , are used in dozens of different kanji.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Check the list of radicals below the word.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

.In this system, common components of characters are identified; these are called radicals in Chinese and logographic systems derived from Chinese, such as Kanji.^ Often, these simple-kanji-which-are-used-in-bigger-kanji are also SWELL RADICALS - kanji with a tree in them have to do with wooden things, kanji with fire in them are about fire, etc.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Like a lot of students, I used to use random, slipshod metaphors with no system - if the same radical showed up in 3 different kanji, I'd use 3 different metaphors for it.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Radicals , such as , are used in dozens of different kanji.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

.Characters are then grouped by their primary radical, then ordered by number of pen strokes within radicals.^ Earlier I talked about kanji ATTRIBUTES - things like ON and KUN yomis, stroke number, and radicals.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ With the CORRECT Stroke Order , and meaning Vertically and Horizontally created images, Within 48 hours of confirmed payment .
  • 100% Accurate Kanji Translation 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.dsfy.com [Source type: General]

.When there is no obvious radical or more than one radical, convention governs which is used for collation.^ Still, there's no way to make bigger KB's from tools and parts, unless one of the tools is a blowtorch.
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ No matter how dreary and gray our homes are, we people of flesh and blood would rather live there than in any other country, be it ever so beautiful.
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ This multiple use is more natural in Japanese than in European languages, for a number of reasons.
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

For example, the Chinese character for "mother" (媽) is sorted as a thirteen-stroke character under the three-stroke primary radical (女) meaning "woman".

Kanji education

This image lists all joyo-kanji, with kyo-iku kanji in red, according to Halpern's KLD indexing system.
.Japanese school children are expected to learn 1,006 basic kanji characters, the kyōiku kanji, before finishing the sixth grade.^ P Xhilononi234 かんじはたのしいです。かじで読むのとかなで読むのとでは、かなで読むよりかんじで読む方がやさしいです。でも、もしかんじは分からないのなら、このかんじはつかいません。 Also, according to the Wakan program (electronic dictionary/learning tool for Chinese and Japanese), There have been 6,355 kanji found and 18,522 traditional Chinese characters found.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Ehhhh クリス Don't know how many are used in Japanese, but the book I'm using to study kanji provides 1,945 commonly used characters, 1,006 of which are the ones taught in the six years of elementary school.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Eventually, simplified forms of selected kanji were used, on an acronymic principle, to represent the basic syllables of Japanese, and these became the kana .
  • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

The order in which these characters are learned is fixed. .The kyōiku kanji list is a subset of a larger list of 1,945 kanji characters known as the jōyō kanji, characters required for the level of fluency necessary to read newspapers and literature in Japanese.^ Ehhhh クリス Don't know how many are used in Japanese, but the book I'm using to study kanji provides 1,945 commonly used characters, 1,006 of which are the ones taught in the six years of elementary school.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ I read somewhere (the Yookoso textbook, I think) that by high school graduation, a Japanese person must know at least (almost 2,000 kanji).
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ They're listed first as kanji (so you can read 'em), then as hiragana (so you can write 'em).
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

This larger list of characters is to be mastered by the end of the ninth grade.[9] Schoolchildren learn the characters by repetition and radical.
.Students studying Japanese as a foreign language are often required to acquire kanji without having first learned the vocabulary associated with them.^ It's a cool language and I'm glad to have learned it first!
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Don't get me wrong, Japanese as it stands today couldn't get by without Kanji.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ For instance, when I started studying, I didn't learn ON yomis for the whole first year, which caused catastrophic problems for me when it was test time.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

.Strategies for these learners vary from copying-based methods to mnemonic-based methods such as those used in James Heisig's series Remembering the Kanji.^ Put another way, ifyou know the 'balls' and 'box' radicals, you can easily make a mnemonic using them to help you remember the kanji for country: "A country is a big box where the citizens keep all their balls."
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Not only that, if you have learned those 3 radicals, you can use them to help figure out dozens of other kanji too!
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Because every foreign kanji book I have read copies the Japanese method.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

.Other textbooks use methods based on the etymology of the characters, such as Mathias and Habein's The Complete Guide to Everyday Kanji and Henshall's A Guide to Remembering Japanese Characters.^ Ehhhh クリス Don't know how many are used in Japanese, but the book I'm using to study kanji provides 1,945 commonly used characters, 1,006 of which are the ones taught in the six years of elementary school.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The ONLY time the Total Cock kanji is used, is with a word that has a totally different meaning, or a totally different pronunciation, from all the other words of the kanji.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Not only that, I deleted a gang of next-to-seldom-used pronunciations for kanji which most textbooks are cluttered with.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

Pictorial mnemonics, as in the text Kanji Pict-o-graphix, are also seen.
.The Japanese government provides the Kanji kentei (日本漢字能力検定試験 Nihon kanji nōryoku kentei shiken; "Test of Japanese Kanji Aptitude") which tests the ability to read and write kanji.^ Reading and Writing Japanese - 3rd Ed.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ I read somewhere (the Yookoso textbook, I think) that by high school graduation, a Japanese person must know at least (almost 2,000 kanji).
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

^ They're listed first as kanji (so you can read 'em), then as hiragana (so you can write 'em).
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

.The highest level of the Kanji kentei tests about 6,000 kanji.^ Think about it like this: if kanji really DID elook like the things' that they describe, you'd have to memorize 2,000 complicated drawings that had nothing in common with each other.
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ I took the two most common sets of kanji used by students: the JLPT kanji, levels 1-4 (which are used in the Japanese Proficiency Test), and the JOYO kanji (which are the 2,000-ish kanji that Japanese students have to memorize in high school).
  • i teach you the kanji real good: schultz's Japanese �����@ page 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.hellodamage.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In reference to how many kanji there are, i know that one of the most elite tests on Japanese, the Kanji Kentei on level 1, tests 6000.
  • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ gold seal from Han emperor, 57 CE, discovered in 1758[citation needed]
  2. ^ James H. Buck, Some Observations on kokuji, in The Journal-Newsletter of the Association of Teachers of Japanese, Vol. 6, No. 2 (Oct. 15, 1969), pp. 45-49.
  3. ^ Rogers, Henry. Writing Systems: A Linguistic Approach. Oxford: Blackwell, 2005. Print.
  4. ^ [1]
  5. ^ http://www.adobe.com/support/downloads/detail.jsp?ftpID=2437 "Introducing the Adobe SING Gaiji architecture"
  6. ^ http://www.adobe.com/devnet/opentype/ "Adobe OpenType Technology Center"
  7. ^ "Representation of Non-standard Characters and Glyphs", Guidelines for Electronic Text Encoding and Interchange.
  8. ^ Reference documentation of <g> element, Guidelines for Electronic Text Encoding and Interchange.
  9. ^ J. Halpern, The Kodansha Kanji Learner's Dictionary, p. 38a (2006).

References

  • DeFrancis, John (1990). The Chinese Language: Fact and Fantasy. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press. ISBN 0-8248-1068-6.
  • Hadamitzky, W., and Spahn, M., (1981) Kanji and Kana, Boston: Tuttle.
  • Hannas, William. C. (1997). Asia's Orthographic Dilemma. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press. ISBN 0-8248-1892-X (paperback); ISBN 0-8248-1842-3 (hardcover).
  • www.japan-guide.com
  • Kaiser, Stephen (1991). .Introduction to the Japanese Writing System.^ On this site, you will find a great information about Japanese writing system and calligraphy designs used as tattoo tribals and design.

    ^ The system of writing that utilizes the Japanese syllabaries.
    • SBF Glossary: K. to kiwi, Kiwi 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.plexoft.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    In Kodansha's Compact Kanji Guide. Tokyo: Kondansha International. .ISBN 4-7700-1553-4.
  • Morohashi Tetsuji, 大漢和辞典/Daikanwajiten (Comprehensive Chinese-Japanese Dictionary) 1984-1986. Tokyo: Taishukan (generally regarded as the most authoritative kanji dictionary)
  • Mitamura, Joyce Yumi and Mitamura, Yasuko Kosaka (1997).^ P Xhilononi234 かんじはたのしいです。かじで読むのとかなで読むのとでは、かなで読むよりかんじで読む方がやさしいです。でも、もしかんじは分からないのなら、このかんじはつかいません。 Also, according to the Wakan program (electronic dictionary/learning tool for Chinese and Japanese), There have been 6,355 kanji found and 18,522 traditional Chinese characters found.
    • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In reference to how many kanji there are, i know that one of the most elite tests on Japanese, the Kanji Kentei on level 1, tests 6000.
    • 6 Reasons Why Kanji is Necessary 16 January 2010 10:28 UTC www.tofugu.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Regards, Rick Vermette Sacramento, California If you are interested in Japanese kanji symbols as a tattoo design, you can see many of our customer's Kanji tattoo design photo .

    Let's Learn Kanji. Tokyo: Kondansha International. ISBN 4-7700-2068-6.
  • Unger, J. Marshall (1996). Literacy and Script Reform in Occupation Japan: Reading Between the Lines. ISBN 0-19-510166-9

External links

.

Glyph conversion


Study guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

Simple English

File:Japanese word "Kanji" (Mincho typeface).png
The kanji for the word "kanji".

Kanji is one of the three forms of Japan writing. A kanji is an ideogram: that is, a kind of simple picture. It is a symbol of an idea such as an object, thing or quality.

Kanji ideograms (or “characters”) were taken about 2000 years ago from Chinese characters, and many were gradually changed. The word “kanji” means “Han characters” (i.e. “Chinese characters”).

There are two other systems used to write in Japanese. These systems are called Hiragana and Katakana (together they are called “Kana”). They show how a word is pronounced because each character stands for a syllable (a, ka, sa, ta etc). Each kanji could also be written in kana, indeed they are in children’s books or books for foreigners learning Japanese.

Many words in Japanese can have more than one meaning, e.g. “hana” can mean “nose” or “flower”, but the kanji character for each is quite different. However, each kanji character can have several different pronounciations, according to which meaning (which “reading”) is intended.

Kanji was originally written to look like what it means, thus the Japanese symbol for mouth is 口 (which is said as "koo-chi"), and looks like a mouth. Another word, 山 (said as "ya-ma") means mountain. The Japanese have Kanji for many words. Many can be shown with just one Kanji, but sometimes two Kanji characters are combined to make new words, such as 山口 (yamaguchi), "mountain-mouth", meaning a cave. (That is also the surname of Olympic figure skater Kristi Yamaguchi, and the name of a prefecture).

Kanji is often combined with hiragana to show the grammatical meaning of the word. In English this would be done with endings (e.g. “act” (the verb), “action” (the noun) etc.

Many kanji characters can be pronounced in two different ways according to whether the word stands alone (this is called the “kun” reading, or “kun-yomi”), or whether it is combined with another word (this called the “on” reading or “on-yomi”). The kun reading is based on Japanese pronounciation, the on reading is based on Chinese pronounciation. For example, 山on its own is "yama" (the Japanese word for “mountain”). When it is combined with another word or name, it is pronounced "san" e.g. “Fuji-san” (“Mount Fuji”).

Kanji characters are classed on the basis of how many brush strokes they are made of. The simplest kanji have one stroke and the most complex may have up to 23 strokes.

There are many different Kanji, the exact number is not known but it is around 50,000. However, not all 50,000 are taught in schools. The government of Japan has set up a 1945 basic Kanji list (Jōyō Kanji) that those learning the language ought to know. They are the ones most commonly used in newspapers and magazines, along with street signs and store signs. Kanji takes many years to learn. By the end of his school years a pupil should know about 1.850 Kanji. A university graduate would need to know about 3000. If someone does not know the Kanji for a word, they can write it in Kana and it will be understood, but it is not the proper way to write it.

Other websites



Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 29, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on Kanji, which are similar to those in the above article.








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