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Kate Winslet
A young woman with shoulder-length, wavy, blonde hair and wearing a low-cut blue gown, is looking to the right with her mouth open as if speaking.
Winslet at the Palm Springs Film Festival, 2007
Born Kate Elizabeth Winslet
5 October 1975 (1975-10-05) (age 34)
Reading, Berkshire, England, UK
Occupation Actress/Singer
Years active 1991 – present
Spouse(s) Jim Threapleton (m. 1998–2001) «start: (1998)–end+1: (2002)»"Marriage: Jim Threapleton to Kate Winslet" Location: (linkback:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kate_Winslet)
Sam Mendes (m. 2003–present) «start: (2003)»"Marriage: Sam Mendes to Kate Winslet" Location: (linkback:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kate_Winslet)

Kate Elizabeth Winslet (born 5 October 1975) is an English actress and occasional singer. She is highly regarded for her performances in several films and has received multiple award nominations. She is the youngest person to accrue six Academy Award nominations, and won the Academy Award for Best Actress for The Reader (2008). Winslet has been acclaimed for both dramatic and comedic work in projects ranging from period to contemporary films, and from major Hollywood productions to less publicised indie films. She has won awards from the Screen Actors Guild, British Academy of Film and Television Arts, and the Hollywood Foreign Press Association among others, and has been nominated for an Emmy Award for television acting.

Raised in Berkshire, Winslet studied drama from childhood, and began her career in British television in 1991. She made her film debut in Heavenly Creatures (1994), for which she received her first notable critical praise. She achieved recognition for her subsequent work in a supporting role in Sense and Sensibility (1995) and for her leading role in Titanic (1997), the highest grossing film for more than 12 years until 2010.

Since 2000, Winslet's performances have continued to draw positive comments from film critics, and she has been nominated for various awards for her work in such films as Quills (2000), Iris (2001), Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004), Finding Neverland (2004), Little Children (2006), The Reader (2008) and Revolutionary Road (2008). Her performance in the latter prompted New York magazine to describe her as "the best English-speaking film actress of her generation".[1] The romantic comedy The Holiday and the animated film Flushed Away (both 2006) were among the biggest commercial successes of her career.

Winslet was awarded a Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album for Children in 2000. She has been included as a vocalist on some soundtracks of works she has performed in, and the single "What If" from the soundtrack for Christmas Carol: The Movie (2001), was a hit single in several European countries. Winslet has a daughter with her former husband, Jim Threapleton, and a son with her current husband, Sam Mendes, from whom she is separated. She lives in New York City.

Contents

Early life

Born in Reading, Berkshire, Winslet is the daughter of Sally Anne (née Bridges), a barmaid, and Roger John Winslet, a swimming-pool contractor.[2] Her parents were "jobbing actors", which led Winslet to comment that she "didn't have a privileged upbringing" and that their daily life was "very hand to mouth".[3] Her maternal grandparents, Linda (née Plumb) and Archibald Oliver Bridges, founded and operated the Reading Repertory Theatre,[3] and her uncle, Robert Bridges, appeared in the original West End production of Oliver!. Her sisters, Beth and Anna Winslet, are also actresses.[3]

Raised in an Anglican household, Winslet began studying drama at the age of 11 at the Redroofs Theatre School, a co-educational independent school in Maidenhead, Berkshire, where she was head girl.[4] At the age of 12, Winslet appeared in a television advertisement directed by filmmaker Tim Pope for Sugar Puffs cereal. Pope said her naturalism was "there from the start".[5]

Career

1991–1997

Winslet's career began on television, with a co-starring role in the BBC children's science fiction serial Dark Season in 1991.[6] This role was followed by appearances in the made-for-TV movie Anglo-Saxon Attitudes in 1992, the sitcom Get Back for ITV and an episode of medical drama Casualty in 1993, also for the BBC.[6]

In 1992, Winslet attended a casting call for Peter Jackson's Heavenly Creatures in London. Winslet auditioned for the part of Juliet Hulme, a teenager who assists in the murder of the mother of her best friend, Pauline Parker (played by Melanie Lynskey). She won the role over 175 other girls.[7] The film included Winslet's singing debut, and her a capella version of "Sono Andata", an aria from La Bohème,[8] was featured on the film's soundtrack.[9] The film was released to favourable reviews in 1994 and won Jackson and partner Fran Walsh a nomination for an Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay.[10] Winslet was awarded an Empire Award and a London Film Critics Circle Award for British Actress of the Year for her performance.[11] The Washington Post writer Desson Thomson commented: "As Juliet, Winslet is a bright-eyed ball of fire, lighting up every scene she’s in. She's offset perfectly by Lynskey, whose quietly smoldering Pauline completes the delicate, dangerous partnership."[12] Speaking about her experience on a film set as an absolute beginner, Winslet noted: "With Heavenly Creatures, all I knew I had to do was completely become that person. In a way it was quite nice doing [the film] and not knowing a bloody thing."[13]

The following year, Winslet auditioned for the small but pivotal role of Lucy Steele in the adaptation of Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility, featuring Emma Thompson, Hugh Grant, and Alan Rickman.[14] She was instead cast in the second leading role of Marianne Dashwood.[14] Director Ang Lee admitted he was initially worried about the way Winslet had attacked her role in Heavenly Creatures and thus required her to exercise tai chi, read Austen-era Gothic novels and poetry, and work with a piano teacher to fit the grace of the role.[14] Budgeted at US$16.5 million ($23.6 million in current year dollars) the film became a financial and critical success, resulting in a worldwide box office total of US$135 million ($192.7 million) and various awards for Winslet, winning her both a BAFTA and a Screen Actors Guild Award, and nominations for both an Academy Award and a Golden Globe.[11][15]

In 1996, Winslet starred in both Jude and Hamlet. In Michael Winterbottom's Jude, based on the Victorian novel Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy, she played Sue Bridehead, a young woman with suffragette leanings who falls in love with her cousin, played by Christopher Eccleston. Acclaimed among critics, it was not a success at the box office, barely grossing US$2 million ($2.8 million) worldwide.[16][17] Richard Corliss of Time magazine said "Winslet is worthy of [...] the camera's scrupulous adoration. She's perfect, a modernist ahead of her time [...] and Jude is a handsome showcase for her gifts."[18] Winslet played Ophelia, Hamlet's drowned lover, in Kenneth Branagh's all star-cast film version of William Shakespeare's Hamlet. The film garnered largely positive reviews and earned Winslet her second Empire Award.[11][19]

In mid-1996, Winslet began filming James Cameron's Titanic (1997), alongside Leonardo DiCaprio.[20] Cast as the sensitive seventeen-year-old Rose DeWitt Bukater, a fictional first-class socialite who survives the 1912 sinking of the RMS Titanic, Winslet's experience was emotionally demanding.[21] "Titanic was totally different and nothing could have prepared me for it. We were really scared about the whole adventure. Jim [Cameron] is a perfectionist, a real genius at making movies. But there was all this bad press before it came out, and that was really upsetting."[21] Against expectations, the film went on to become the highest-grossing film of all time, grossing more than US$1.843 billion ($2.6 billion) in box-office receipts worldwide,[22] and transformed Winslet into a commercial movie star.[23] Subsequently, she was nominated for most of the high-profile awards, winning a European Film Award.[24][11]

1998–2003

Shot prior to the release of Titanic, Hideous Kinky, a low-budget hippie romance, was Winslet's sole film of 1998.[25] Winslet had rejected offers to play the leading roles in Shakespeare in Love (1998) and Anna and the King (1999) in favour of the role of a young English mother named Julia who moves with her daughters from London to Morocco hoping to start a new life.[25][26] The film garnered generally mixed reviews and received only limited distribution,[27] resulting in a worldwide gross of US$5 million ($6.5 million).[28] Despite the success of Titanic, the next film Winslet opted to star in was Holy Smoke! (1999), featuring Harvey Keitel, another low-budget project—much to the chagrin of her agents, who felt "miserable" about her preference of arthouse movies.[13][21] Feeling pressured, Winslet has said she "never saw Titanic as a springboard for bigger films or bigger pay cheques", knowing that "it could have been that, but would have destroyed [her]."[29] The same year, she voiced Brigid in the computer animated film Faeries.[30]

In 2000, Winslet appeared in the period piece Quills with Geoffrey Rush and Joaquin Phoenix, a film inspired by the life and work of the Marquis de Sade. The actress served as somewhat of a "patron saint" of the film for being the first big name to back it, accepting the role of a chambermaid in the asylum and the courier of the The Marquis' manuscripts to the underground publishers.[31] Well-received by critics, the film garnered numerous accolades for Winslet, including nominations for SAG and Satellite Awards.[11] The film was a modest arthouse success, averaging US$27,709 ($35,004) per screen its debut weekend, and eventually grossing US$18 million ($22.7 million) internationally.[32]

In 2001's Enigma, Winslet played a young woman who finds herself falling for a brilliant young World War II code breaker, played by Dougray Scott.[33] Her first war film, Winslet regarded "making Enigma a brilliant experience" as she was five months pregnant at the time of the shoot, forcing some tricky camera work from the director Michael Apted.[33] Generally well-received,[34] Winslet was awarded a British Independent Film Award for her performance,[11] and A. O. Scott of The New York Times described Winslet as "more crush-worthy than ever."[35] In the same year she appeared in Richard Eyre's critically acclaimed film Iris, portraying Irish novelist Iris Murdoch. Winslet shared her role with Judi Dench, with both actresses portraying Murdoch at different phases of her life.[36] Subsequently, each of them was nominated for an Academy Award the following year, scoring Winslet her third nomination.[11] Also in 2001, she voiced the character Belle in the animated motion picture Christmas Carol: The Movie, based on the Charles Dickens classic novel. For the film, Winslet recorded the song "What If," which was released in November 2001 as a single[37] with proceeds donated to two of Winslet's favourite charities, the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children and the Sargeant Cancer Foundation for Children.[37][38] A Europe-wide top ten hit, it reached number one in Austria, Belgium, and Ireland,[39] number six on the UK Singles Chart,[40] and won the 2002 OGAE Song Contest.[41]

Her next film role was in the 2003 drama The Life of David Gale, in which she played an ambitious journalist who interviews a death-sentenced professor, played by Kevin Spacey, in his final weeks before execution. The film underperformed at international box offices, garnering only half of its US$50,000,000 budget,[42] and generating mostly critical reviews,[43] with Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times calling it a "silly movie."[44]

2004–2006

Following The Life of David Gale, Winslet appeared alongside Jim Carrey in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004), a neosurrealistic indie-drama by French director Michel Gondry. In the film, she played the role of Clementine Kruczynski, a chatty, spontaneous and somewhat neurotic woman, who decides to have all memories of her ex-boyfriend erased from her mind.[45] The role was a departure from her previous roles, with Winslet revealing in an interview with Variety that she was initially upended about her casting in the film: "This was not the type of thing I was being offered [...] I was just thrilled that there was something he had seen in me, in spite of the corsets, that he thought was going to work for Clementine.”[46] The film was a critical and financial success.[47] Winslet received rave reviews for her Academy Award-nominated performance, which Peter Travers of Rolling Stone described as "electrifying and bruisingly vulnerable."[48]

Her final film in 2004 was Finding Neverland. The story of the production focused on Scottish writer J. M. Barrie (Johnny Depp) and his platonic relationship with Sylvia Llewelyn Davies (Winslet), whose sons inspired him to pen the classic play Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up. During promotion of the film, Winslet noted of her portrayal "It was very important for me in playing Sylvia that I was already a mother myself, because I don’t think I could have played that part if I didn’t know what it felt like to be a parent and have those responsibilities and that amount of love that you give to a child [...] and I've always got a baby somewhere, or both of them, all over my face."[49] The film received favourable reviews and proved to be an international success, becoming Winslet's highest-grossing film since Titanic with a total of US$118 million worldwide.[50][51]

In 2005, Winslet appeared in an episode of BBC's comedy series Extras as a satirical version of herself. While dressed as a nun, she was portrayed giving phone sex tips to the romantically challenged character of Maggie.[52] Her performance in the episode led to her first nomination for an Emmy Award.[11] In Romance & Cigarettes (2005), a musical romantic comedy written and directed by John Turturro, she played the character Tula, described by Winslet as "a slut, someone who’s essentially foulmouthed and has bad manners and really doesn’t know how to dress."[53] Hand-picked by Turturro, who was impressed with her display of dancing ability in Holy Smoke!, Winslet was praised for her performance,[53] which included her interpretation of Connie Francis's "Scapricciatiello (Do You Love Me Like You Kiss Me)".[54] Derek Elley of Variety wrote: "Onscreen less, but blessed with the showiest role, filthiest one-liners, [and] a perfect Lancashire accent that's comical enough in the Gotham setting Winslet throws herself into the role with an infectious gusto."[55]

After declining an invitation to appear in Woody Allen's film Match Point (2005), Winslet stated that she wanted to be able to spend more time with her children.[56] She began 2006 with All the King's Men, featuring Sean Penn and Jude Law. Winslet played the role of Anne Stanton, the childhood sweetheart of Jack Burden (Law). The film was critically and financially unsuccessful.[57][58] Todd McCarthy of Variety summed it up as "overstuffed and fatally miscast [...] Absent any point of engagement to become involved in the characters, the film feels stillborn and is unlikely to stir public excitement, even in an election year."[59]

Winslet fared far better when she joined the cast of Todd Field's Little Children, playing Sarah Pierce, a bored homemaker who has a torrid affair with a married neighbour, played by Patrick Wilson. Both her performance and the film received rave reviews; A.O. Scott of The New York Times wrote: "In too many recent movies intelligence is woefully undervalued, and it is this quality—even more than its considerable beauty—that distinguishes Little Children from its peers. The result is a movie that is challenging, accessible and hard to stop thinking about. Ms. Winslet, as fine an actress as any working in movies today, registers every flicker of Sarah’s pride, self-doubt and desire, inspiring a mixture of recognition, pity and concern that amounts, by the end of the movie, to something like love. That Ms. Winslet is so lovable makes the deficit of love in Sarah’s life all the more painful."[60] For her work in the film, she was honored with a Britannia Award for British Artist of the Year from BAFTA/LA, a Los Angeles-based offshoot of the BAFTA Awards.[61] and nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress, and at 31, became the youngest actress to ever garner five Oscar nominations.[62]

She followed Little Children with a role in Nancy Meyers' romantic comedy The Holiday, also starring Cameron Diaz, Jude Law, and Jack Black. In it she played Iris, a British woman who temporarily exchanges homes with an American woman (Diaz). Released to a mixed reception by critics,[63] the film became Winslet's biggest commercial success in nine years, grossing more than US$205 million worldwide.[64] Also in 2006, Winslet provided her voice for several smaller projects. In the CG-animated Flushed Away, she voiced Rita, a scavenging sewer rat who helps Roddy (Hugh Jackman) escape from the city of Ratropolis and return to his luxurious Kensington origins. A critical and commercial success, the film collected US$177,665,672 at international box offices.[65]

2007–present

A young woman with blonde hair, pulled back from her face wears diamond earrings and formal gown. She looks to her right and waves and smiles.
Winslet at the 81st Academy Awards in February 2009

In 2007, Winslet reunited with Leonardo DiCaprio to film Revolutionary Road (2008). Directed by husband Sam Mendes, it was Winslet who suggested that both should work with her on a film adaptation of the 1961 novel of the same name by Richard Yates after reading the script by Justin Haythe.[66] Resulting in both "a blessing and an added pressure" on-set, the reunion was her first experience working with Mendes.[67] Portraying a couple in a failing marriage in the 1950s, DiCaprio and Winslet watched period videos promoting life in the suburbs to prepare themselves for the film,[67] which earned them favorable reviews.[68] In his review of the film, David Edelstein of New York magazine stated that "[t]here isn’t a banal moment in Winslet’s performance—not a gesture, not a word. Is Winslet now the best English-speaking film actress of her generation? I think so."[1] Winslet was awarded a Golden Globe Award for Best Actress for her performance, her seventh nomination from the Golden Globes.[11]

Also released in fall 2008, the film competed against Winslet's other project, a film adaptation of Bernhard Schlink's 1995 novel The Reader, directed by Stephen Daldry and featuring Ralph Fiennes and David Kross in supporting roles. Originally the first choice for her role, she was initially not able to take on the role due to a scheduling conflict with Revolutionary Road, and Nicole Kidman replaced her.[69] A month after filming began, however, Kidman left the role due to her pregnancy, enabling Winslet to rejoin the film.[69] Employing a German accent, Winslet portrayed a former Nazi concentration camp guard who has an affair with a teenager (Kross) who, as an adult, witnesses her war crimes trial.[70] She later said the role was difficult for her, as she was naturally unable "to sympathise with an SS guard."[71] While the film garnered mixed reviews in general,[72] Winslet received favorable reviews for her performance.[72] The following year, she earned her sixth Academy Award nomination and went on to win the Best Actress award, the BAFTA Award for Best Actress, a Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress, and a Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actress.[11]

Winslet is set to headline the HBO miniseries Mildred Pierce, a five-hour remake of the 1945 film of the same name, with production slated to begin in April 2010.[73] She was cast in the Steven Soderbergh disaster film, Contagion which is scheduled to film in the fall of 2010.[74]

Personal life

While on the set of Dark Season, Winslet met actor-writer Stephen Tredre, with whom she had a nearly five-year relationship.[20][75] He died of bone cancer soon after Winslet completed filming Titanic, causing her to miss the film's premiere in order to attend his funeral in London.[75] She and Titanic co-star Leonardo DiCaprio have remained good friends since the filming.[76]

Winslet was later in a relationship with Rufus Sewell,[20] but on 22 November 1998 she married director Jim Threapleton, whom she met while on the set of Hideous Kinky.[77] They have a daughter, Mia Honey, who was born on 12 October 2000 in London.[77] Winslet and Threapleton divorced in 2001,[78] Winslet began a relationship with Sam Mendes, whom she married on 24 May 2003 on the island of Anguilla in the Caribbean.[77] Their son, Joe Alfie Winslet Mendes, was born on 22 December 2003 in New York City.[77] Mendes and Winslet announced a separation in March 2010, stating that "The split is entirely amicable and is by mutual agreement."[79]

Mendes and his production company, Neal Street Productions, purchased the film rights to the long-delayed biography of circus tiger tamer Mabel Stark.[80] The couple's spokesperson said, "It's a great story, they have had their eyes on it for a while. If they can get the script right, it would make a great film."[80]

The media have documented her weight fluctuations over the years.[75][77] Winslet has been outspoken about her refusal to allow Hollywood to dictate her weight.[76][81] In February 2003, British GQ magazine published photographs of Winslet which had been digitally enhanced to make her look dramatically thinner than she really was.[77] Winslet issued a statement that the alterations were made without her consent, saying "I just didn't want people to think I was a hypocrite and that I'd suddenly lost 30 lbs. or whatever".[82] GQ subsequently issued an apology.[81] She won a libel suit in 2009 against British tabloid The Daily Mail after it printed that she lied about her exercise regime.[83] Winslet said she had always expressed the opinion that women should be encouraged to accept their appearance with pride, and therefore "was particularly upset to be accused of lying about my exercise regime, and felt that I had a responsibility to request an apology in order to demonstrate my commitment to the views that I have always expressed about body issues, including diet and exercise."[83]

Winslet and Mendes reside in Greenwich Village in New York City.[84] They also own a Grade II-listed five-bedroom house, set in 22 acres in the village of Church Westcote in Gloucestershire, England.[85] After purchasing the house for £3 million, they have reportedly spent a further £1 million in renovations, as the house had fallen into disrepair after the death of its former owner, the equestrian artist Raoul Millais in 1999.[85]

Mendes was scheduled to fly on American Airlines Flight 77, which was hijacked on 11 September 2001 and subsequently crashed into the Pentagon.[86] In October 2001, Winslet was seven hours into a London-Dallas flight with her daughter Mia when a passenger who claimed to be a terrorist, later charged with creating mischief, stood up and shouted "We are all going to die."[86] As a result of these incidents, Winslet and Mendes never fly together on the same aircraft, as they fear leaving their children parentless. [86]

Awards and nominations

Winslet won an Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance in The Reader (2008). She won two Golden Globe Awards in the same year: Best Actress (Drama) for Revolutionary Road and Best Supporting Actress for The Reader. She has won two BAFTA Awards: Best Actress for The Reader, and Best Supporting Actress for Sense and Sensibility (1995). She has earned a total of six Academy Award nominations, seven Golden Globe nominations, and seven BAFTA nominations.[81][87][88]

She has received numerous awards from other organisations, including the Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress for Iris (2001) and the Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role for Sense and Sensibility and The Reader. Premiere magazine named her portrayal of Clementine Kruczynski in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004) as the 81st greatest film performance of all time.[89]

Academy Award nomination milestones

Winslet was 26 when she received her third Academy Award nomination, for Iris, just missing the mark of Natalie Wood, who received her third nomination at age 25.[90] She set the mark as the youngest actor to receive five nominations, at age 31, for Little Children (2006). She surpassed Bette Davis, who was 33 when she received her fifth nomination for her performance in The Little Foxes (1941).[91] With her Best Actress nomination for The Reader, Winslet became the youngest actor to receive six Oscar nominations. At age 33, Winslet passed the mark Davis, one year older, set with Now, Voyager (1942).[92]

Winslet received Academy Award nominations as the younger versions of the characters played by fellow nominees Gloria Stuart, as Rose, in Titanic (1997)[93] and Judi Dench, as Iris Murdoch, in Iris.[94] These are the only instances of the younger and older versions of a character in the same film both yielding Academy Award nominations.[93]

When she was not nominated for her work in Revolutionary Road, Winslet became only the second actress to win a Golden Globe for Best Actress (Drama) without getting an Oscar nomination for the same performance (Shirley MacLaine was the first for Madame Sousatzka [1988], and she won the Golden Globe in a three-way tie). Academy rules allow an actor to receive no more than one nomination in a given category; as the Academy nominating process determined that Winslet's work in The Reader would be considered a lead performance—unlike the Golden Globes, which considered it a supporting performance—she could not also receive a Best Actress nomination for Revolutionary Road.[95]

Awards for other work

In 2000, Winslet won a Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album for Children for Listen To the Storyteller.[96][97] She was nominated for an Emmy Award for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series for playing herself in a 2005 episode of Extras.[98]

Filmography

Year Film Role Notes
1991 Dark Season Reet (TV series)
1992 Get Back Eleanor Sweet (TV series)
1994 Heavenly Creatures Juliet Hulme Empire Award for Best British Actress
London Film Critics Circle Award for British Actress of the Year
New Zealand Film and TV Award for Best Foreign Performer
1995 A Kid in King Arthur's Court Princess Sarah
Sense and Sensibility Marianne Dashwood BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role
Evening Standard British Film Award for Best Actress also for Jude
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role
Nominated–Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated–Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture
Nominated–Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
1996 Jude Sue Bridehead Evening Standard British Film Award for Best Actress also for Sense and Sensibility
Hamlet Ophelia Empire Award for Best British Actress
Nominated–Satellite Award for Best Supporting Actress - Motion Picture
1997 Titanic Rose DeWitt Bukater Blockbuster Entertainment Award for Favorite Actress – Drama
Empire Award for Best British Actress
European Film Awards – Jameson Audience/People's Choice Award for Best British Actress
Golden Camera – Germany – Film – International (Exceptional work in a non-German production)
Nominated–Academy Award for Best Actress
Nominated–Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama
Nominated–London Film Critics Circle Award for British Actress of the Year
Nominated–MTV Movie Award for Best Performance
Nominated–MTV Movie Award for Best Kiss shared with Leonardo DiCaprio
Nominated–MTV Movie Award for Best On-Screen Duo shared with Leonardo DiCaprio
Nominated–Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Nominated–European Film Awards – Outstanding Achievement in World Cinema
Nominated–Satellite Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Drama
Nominated–Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
Nominated–Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
1998 Hideous Kinky Julia
1999 Faeries Brigid (voice)
Holy Smoke! Ruth Barron
2000 Quills Madeleine 'Maddy' LeClerc Evening Standard British Film Award for Best Actress also for Enigma and Iris
Las Vegas Film Critics Society Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated–Blockbuster Entertainment Awards – Favorite Actress – Drama
Nominated–London Film Critics Circle Award for British Actress of the Year
Nominated–Satellite Award for Best Supporting Actress - Motion Picture Drama
Nominated–Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role
2001 Enigma Hester Wallace Evening Standard British Film Award for Best Actress also for Iris and Quills
Nominated–British Independent Film Award for Best Actress
Christmas Carol: The Movie Belle (voice)
Iris Young Iris Murdoch Empire Award for Best British Actress
Evening Standard British Film Award for Best Actress also for Enigma and Quills
European Film Awards – Jameson Audience/People's Choice Award for Best British Actress
Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated–Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated–BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role
Nominated–Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture
Nominated–Satellite Award for Best Supporting Actress - Motion Picture
2003 The Life of David Gale Bitsey Bloom
2004 Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind Clementine Kruczynski Empire Award for Best British Actress
International Cinephile Society Award for Best Actress
Las Vegas Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress also for Finding Neverland
London Film Critics Circle Award for British Actress of the Year tied with Eva Birthistle for Ae Fond Kiss...
Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Santa Barbara International Film Festival – Outstanding Performance of the Year Award also for Finding Neverland
Nominated–Academy Award for Best Actress
Nominated–BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role
Nominated–Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated–Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Nominated–People's Choice Awards – Favorite Leading Lady
Nominated–People's Choice Awards – Favorite On-Screen Chemistry shared with Jim Carrey
Nominated–Satellite Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Nominated–Saturn Award for Best Actress
Nominated–Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
Finding Neverland Sylvia Llewelyn Davies Las Vegas Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress also for Eternal Sunshine
Santa Barbara International Film Festival – Outstanding Performance of the Year Award also for Eternal Sunshine
Nominated–Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated–Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
Nominated–BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role
Nominated–Teen Choice Awards – Choice Movie Actress – Motion Picture Drama
2005 Romance & Cigarettes Tula
2006 All the King's Men Anne Stanton
Little Children Sarah Pierce The Britannia Award for British Artist of the Year
Gotham Awards – Tribute Award
Palm Springs International Film Festival – Desert Palm Achievement Award
Nominated–Academy Award for Best Actress
Nominated–BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role
Nominated–Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated–Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated–Golden Globe Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Drama
Nominated–London Film Critics Circle Award for British Actress of the Year
Nominated–Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Nominated–Satellite Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Drama
Nominated–Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
Flushed Away Rita (voice)
The Holiday Iris Simpkins
Deep Sea 3D Narrator (voice)
2008 The Fox and the Child Narrator (voice)
The Reader Hanna Schmitz Academy Award for Best Actress
BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role
Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
European Film Award for Best Actress
Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress - Motion Picture
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role
Las Vegas Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress also for Revolutionary Road
London Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress also for Revolutionary Road
RopeofSilicon Movie Award for Best Supporting Actress
San Diego Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Vancouver Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress also for Revolutionary Road
Nominated–London Film Critics Circle Award for British Actress of the Year
Nominated–MTV Movie Award for Best Performance
Nominated–Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated–Satellite Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Drama
Revolutionary Road April Wheeler Alliance of Women Film Journalists – Best Actress
Detroit Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Golden Globe Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Drama
Las Vegas Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress also for The Reader
London Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress also for The Reader
Palm Springs International Film Festival – Best Cast Performance
St. Louis Film Critics Association Awards – Best Actress
Vancouver Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress also for The Reader
Santa Barbara International Film Festival – Montevito Award
Nominated–BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role
Nominated–Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Nominated–Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role

References

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  54. ^ Holden, Stephen (2007-09-07). "Blue Collar Guy Loses His Heart and Ruins His Lungs". The New York Times. http://movies.nytimes.com/2007/09/07/movies/07roma.html. Retrieved 2009-12-03. 
  55. ^ Elley, Derek (2007-09-05). "Romance & Cigarettes". Variety. http://www.variety.com/review/VE1117928084.html?categoryid=31&cs=1&p=0. Retrieved 2009-02-07. 
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External links


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

Kate Elizabeth Winslet (born October 5, 1975, in Reading, Berkshire, England) is an English actress most famous for her role of Rose DeWitt Bukater in the 1997 blockbuster movie Titanic.

Attributed

  • “Plastic surgery and breast implants are fine for people who want that, if it makes them feel better about who they are. But, it makes these people, actors especially, fantasy figures for a fantasy world. Acting is about being real being honest.
  • I'm a 'bit famous now. It's a 'bit strange.

NBC Morning (1998)

  • I don't believe in, sort of, holding back. Life isn't a dress rehearsal.

NBC Morning (1998)

  • My older sister Anne and I used to do a lot of theatre and sometimes we missed school because we were too tired. And my mum sort of didn’t mind because she knew that we loved what we were doing. And I remember arriving one day at school and a girl said: ‘My mum thinks that it’s really bad that your mum doesn’t send you to school. What about your education!’ And I remember saying…I was ten years old…I remember saying: 'What about my career!'

The Clive James Show (1998)

  • Since I was 13 or 14, I've always felt older than I actually am.
  • I was on the tube just before Christmas. and this girl turned round to me and said, 'Are you Kate Winslet?'. And I said, 'Well, yes. I am actually'. And she said, 'And you're getting the tube?' And I said, 'Yes'. And she said, 'Don't you have a big car that drives you around?' And I said, 'No'. And she was absolutely stunned that I wasn't being driven round in some flash car all the time. It was ludicrous.
  • People say to me, 'You seem to have made this conscious decision to do independent films'. In reality, I haven't. After each movie, I always think, how different can it possibly be?... Is this going to challenge me, is this going to inspire me, and is this going to make me love my job more than I already do?
  • Every time I go to work now, I go through this suicidal saga of, 'I'm terrible,' 'I'm fat,' 'I'm ugly,' 'I can't do it anymore.' I get paranoid. It's so incredibly encouraging when people say they like me and my work, but it almost frightens me because I think, 'Oh shit! I have to live up to it, not disappoint them.'
  • Ultimately, you just have one life. You never know unless you try. And you never get anywhere unless you ask.
  • I always seem to end up in hospital somewhere along the line. It's very funny, but it's true I don't really feel I have done my job properly unless I come out feeling that I've suffered in some way.
  • I am who I am. I’m healthy. I swim a mile every day. I’ll never be a stick insect, and I wouldn’t want to be either because it seems to me that a lot of people who are very thin are just really unhappy.
  • I am insecure. If you ask me, everybody is.
  • I wouldn't dream of working on something that didn't make my gut rumble and my heart want to explode.
  • Don't act, be.
  • I do believe in God. Well, actually, I suppose I don't, really. If there is a God for me, it's in the elements — the fresh air, trees... some sort of elemental God.
  • Mum and dad were very much friends, and up to life. There was no anxiety for anything when I was growing up, they just taught me to be me.
  • There are moments to indulge and enjoy, but I always know when it's time to go home and wash my knickers.
  • The whole concept of 'grounding' children is utterly stupid - they just go off and rebel and don't like you. When my kids eventually come along, I don't want them to not like me.
  • I have no regrets. If you regret things, you're sort of stepping backwards. I'm a believer in going forwards.
  • Life is short, and it is here to be lived.
  • I am happy the way that I am. I mean I’m not a model, I’m an actress.
  • I'd much rather be known as some curvy Kate than as some skinny stick.
  • There's more to life than cheek bones.
  • One thing that's very important to me in life is, through having a relationship with somebody and loving that person and being allowed to feel the whole emotion of love despite all the risks, you can find out who you are.
  • Loving someone is setting them free, letting them go.
  • When you're the mother of small children, life becomes a holiday.
  • I do think actually, particularly at the moment, (that) it seems to be quite disturbing all this stuff, this obsession with image and weight. It’s got really out of control. There isn’t a day that goes by when there isn’t another sort of ‘Look-who’s-the-thinnest-thing’. It really upsets me, it really does. […] What’s that telling people? Is that a good message? I don’t think so.

The Parkinson Show (2006)

  • With acting I never get to a point where I think: Ok I know how to do this. And I'm so glad I don't think that because actually I'm sure in some way it would be fatal for me to think:I know how to do it. I've got it all planned. Because the truth is about acting there is really no right or wrong way to do it. It's just about how the individual actor or actress feels in that one moment and what is truthfull and honest to them in terms of how they play that part. And you have to rely so much on your insticts and your confidence too. I've always said, (that) I really think that acting is 50% skill and 50% confidence.

The Travis Show (2006)

  • ‘As an actress all you can hope for is that you will be in presence of a challenge every day, you will be terrified every day and that you have to really push yourself though that level of fear in order to convey the honesty of emotion that you need to make a charecter come to life’

The Reader Premiere (2008)

External links

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about:

Simple English

Kate Winslet
File:Kate Winslet Palm Film
Born Kate Elizabeth Winslet
October 5, 1975 (1975-10-05) (age 35)
Reading, Berkshire, England, United Kingdom
Nationality British
Ethnicity White
Height 5' 8" (1.73 m)
Spouse Jim Threapleton (1998-2001)
Sam Mendes (2003-present)
Partner Stephen Tredre (?-1995)
Children Daughter and son
Parents Roger Winslet
Sally (née Bridges)
Relatives Anna Winslet, Beth Winslet (sisters)

Kate Elizabeth Winslet (born 5 October 1975, in Reading, Berkshire) is an English actress. She is best known for her starring role in the American movie, Titanic and for her starring turn in Peter Jackson's Oscar-nominated movie Heavenly Creatures (1994).

Films

  • Heavenly Creatures (1994) Juliet Hulme
  • A Kid in King Arthur's Court (1995) Princess Sarah
  • Sense and Sensibility (1995) Marianne Dashwood
  • Jude (1996) Sue Bridehead
  • Hamlet (1996) Ophelia
  • Titanic (1997) Rose DeWitt Bukater
  • Hideous Kinky (1998) Julie
  • Faeries (1999) Brigid
  • Holy Smoke! (1999) Ruth Barron
  • Quills (2000) Madeleine LeClerc
  • Enigma (2001) Hester Wallace
  • Christmas Carol: The Movie (2001) Belle
  • Iris (2001) Young Iris Murdoch
  • The Life of David Gale (2003) Bitsey Bloom
  • Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004) Clementine Kruczynski
  • Finding Neverland (2004) Sylvia Llewelyn Davies
  • Romance & Cigarettes (2005) Tula
  • All the King's Men (2006) Anne Station
  • Little Children (2006) Sarah Pierce
  • Flushed Away (2006) Rita Malone
  • The Holiday (2006) Iris Simpkins

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