Keke Rosberg: Wikis

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Keke Rosberg
Nationality Finland Finnish
Formula One World Championship career
Active years 1978 - 1986
Teams Theodore, ATS, Wolf, Fittipaldi, Williams, McLaren
Races 128 (114 starts)
Championships 1 (1982)
Wins 5
Podiums 17
Career points 159.5
Pole positions 5
Fastest laps 3
First race 1978 South African Grand Prix
First win 1982 Swiss Grand Prix
Last win 1985 Australian Grand Prix
Last race 1986 Australian Grand Prix

Keijo Erik Rosberg (About this sound pronunciation ) (born December 6, 1948 in Solna, Stockholm County, Sweden), nicknamed "Keke", is a Finnish former racing driver and winner of the 1982 Formula One World Championship. He was the first Finnish driver to compete regularly in the series. Rosberg grew up in Oulu and Iisalmi, Finland. He is the father of current Mercedes GP driver Nico Rosberg.

Contents

Minor teams

Rosberg in the Wolf pits in 1979.

Rosberg had a relatively late start to his F1 career, debuting at the age of 29 after stints in Formula Vee, Formula Atlantic and its antipodean counterpart Formula Pacific and Formula 2, then "feeder" series to F1. His first F1 drive was with the Theodore team during the 1978 season.[1] He immediately caught the attention of the F1 paddock with a superb drive in the non-Championship BRDC International Trophy at Silverstone in just his second race with the team, emerging victorious after many of the big names had been caught out by a tremendous downpour. Rosberg wasn't able to qualify for a race afterwards, and was signed by another uncompetitive team, ATS, for 3 races after the Theodore team scrapped its unreliable car design. He returned to Theodore after they acquired old chassis from the Wolf formula 1 team, but these were also uncompetitive and Rosberg returned to ATS to end the season.

He next emerged onto the F1 stage with the Wolf team, midway through the 1979 season. However, the team was having difficulty staying solvent, and Rosberg had problems in finishing races. Rosberg soon had to change teams again when Wolf left F1, and signed with Fittipaldi Automotive which had bought the remains of Walter Wolf's squad. He had his first two point-scoring results in the 1980 season - including a podium - but often failed to finish or qualify; 1981 was worse — he failed to score at all.

The sharp end

Rosberg's championship-winning Williams FW08 at the 2008 Silverstone Classic race meeting.
Rosberg won the 1984 Dallas Grand Prix in a Williams FW09.

Despite this, Williams was interested in Rosberg, with the retirement of former World Champion Alan Jones leaving a seat open for the 1982 season.[1] Given a competitive car, Rosberg was a revelation that year. Rosberg consistently scored points and earned his first victory in the Swiss Grand Prix at Dijon-Prenois late that year. Rosberg's first memorable season came in a year where no driver won more than two races, (though it must be said that the highly successful Ferrari season was damaged by the injuries to Didier Pironi and the tragic fatality of Gilles Villeneuve at Zolder, not to mention the astounding unreliability of the turbocharged Brabham-BMW and Renault cars) and consistency won Rosberg the Drivers' Championship, despite using the once ubiquitous Ford/Cosworth normally aspirated V8 against turbo-engined rivals.

Rosberg driving for Williams at the 1985 German Grand Prix.

Rosberg's post championship years would be hamstrung by both uncompetitive chassis from Williams, and the powerful but unreliable (until 1985) Honda turbo engine. Cruelly, the Honda engine began producing regular results just after Rosberg had signed for McLaren in mid-1985. Rosberg's pole position-winning lap at that year's British Grand Prix stood as the fastest single lap (at an average speed of 160.9 miles per hour (258.9 km/h)) in F1 history until 2001. The Williams-Honda team would go on to dominate grand prix racing through 1987- with both Nelson Piquet and Nigel Mansell benefitting from the work Rosberg had done to develop the engine in conjunction with Honda. At the time, Rosberg's move to McLaren for the 1986 season[1] had seemed a master stroke - the team was coming off back to back championships in 1984/85. However, Rosberg found himself in an underpowered McLaren and was soundly beaten by teammate Alain Prost (whose smoother driving style seemed to be more effective in the inherently-understeering MP4/2C chassis). On top of that, the fatal crash of Elio de Angelis while testing a Brabham in France deeply affected him (Rosberg and de Angelis were close friends) and he retired at the end of the season. He would later admit that he retired "too soon".

Racing after Formula One

In 1989 Rosberg made his comeback in the Spa 24 Hours in a Ferrari Mondial run by Moneytron (cf. Jean-Pierre Van Rossem and Onyx), the same team that gave Rosberg's protege JJ Lehto his debut in Formula One. Rosberg was a key element of Peugeot's extremely competitive sportscar squad in the early 1990s.[1] But after two years with the marque and varied successes (two victories and a failed attempt at the 24 Hours of Le Mans), he moved on to the German Touring Car Championship, the DTM, driving for Mercedes-Benz and Opel. Here he set up his own team, Team Rosberg, in 1995 and at the end of that year withdrew from driving to concentrate on running it.

Team Rosberg ran for another year in the DTM, until the series collapsed, and has been present in Formula BMW, German Formula Three, the Formula Three Euroseries and A1 GP since. Team Rosberg returned to the revived DTM in 2000, entering two Mercedes. Success, or even just scoring points, became harder with each passing season and Team Rosberg quit the series after their 2004 campaign, only to return in 2006, this time with Audi.

The next generation

Rosberg later spent a long time managing his countrymen Jyrki Järvilehto and future world champion Mika Häkkinen. Until 2008 he also managed his son Nico, who entered Formula One in 2006 driving for WilliamsF1.

Complete Formula One World Championship results

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position; races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 WDC Points
1978 Theodore Racing Hong Kong Theodore TR1 Cosworth V8 ARG
BRA
RSA
Ret
USW
DNPQ
MON
DNPQ
BEL
DNQ
ESP
DNPQ
NC 0
ATS Racing Team ATS HS1 SWE
15
FRA
16
GBR
17
Theodore Racing Hong Kong Wolf WR3 GER
10
AUT
NC
Wolf WR4 NED
Ret
ITA
DNPQ
ATS Racing Team ATS D1 USA
Ret
CAN
NC
1979 Olympus Cameras Wolf Racing Wolf WR8 Cosworth V8 ARG
BRA
RSA
USW
ESP
BEL
MON
FRA
9
GER
Ret
ITA
Ret
NC 0
Wolf WR7 GBR
Ret
Wolf WR9 AUT
Ret
NED
Ret
CAN
DNQ
Wolf WR8/9 USA
Ret
1980 Skol Fittipaldi Team Fittipaldi F7 Cosworth V8 ARG
3
BRA
9
RSA
Ret
USW
Ret
BEL
7
MON
DNQ
FRA
Ret
GBR
DNQ
10th 6
Fittipaldi F8 GER
Ret
AUT
16
NED
DNQ
ITA
5
CAN
9
USA
10
1981 Fittipaldi Automotive Fittipaldi F8C Cosworth V8 USW
Ret
BRA
9
ARG
Ret
SMR
Ret
BEL
Ret
MON
DNQ
ESP
12
FRA
Ret
GBR
Ret
GER
DNQ
AUT
NED
DNQ
ITA
DNQ
CAN
DNQ
CPL
10
NC 0
1982 TAG Williams Team Williams FW07C Cosworth V8 RSA
5
BRA
DSQ
USW
2
SMR
1st 44
Williams FW08 BEL
2
MON
Ret
DET
4
CAN
Ret
NED
3
GBR
Ret
FRA
5
GER
3
AUT
2
SUI
1
ITA
8
CPL
5
1983 TAG Williams Team Williams FW08C Cosworth V8 BRA
DSQ
USW
Ret
FRA
5
SMR
4
MON
1
BEL
5
DET
2
CAN
4
GBR
11
GER
10
AUT
8
NED
Ret
ITA
11
EUR
Ret
5th 27
Williams FW09 Honda V6 (t/c) RSA
5
1984 Williams Grand Prix Eng. Williams FW09 Honda V6 (t/c) BRA
2
RSA
Ret
BEL
4
SMR
Ret
FRA
6
MON
4
CAN
Ret
DET
Ret
DAL
1
8th 20.5
Williams FW09B GBR
Ret
GER
Ret
AUT
Ret
NED
8
ITA
Ret
EUR
Ret
POR
Ret
1985 Canon Williams Team Williams FW10 Honda V6 (t/c) BRA
Ret
POR
Ret
SMR
Ret
MON
8
CAN
4
DET
1
FRA
2
GBR
Ret
GER
12
AUT
Ret
NED
Ret
ITA
Ret
BEL
4
EUR
3
RSA
2
AUS
1
3rd 40
1986 Marlboro McLaren Int. McLaren MP4/2C TAG V6 (t/c) BRA
Ret
ESP
4
SMR
5
MON
2
BEL
Ret
CAN
4
DET
Ret
FRA
4
GBR
Ret
GER
5
HUN
Ret
AUT
9
ITA
4
POR
Ret
MEX
Ret
AUS
Ret
6th 22

References

Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Heikki Ikola
Finnish Sportspersonality of the year
1982
Succeeded by
Tiina Lillak
Preceded by
first winner
Autosport
International Racing Driver Award

1982
Succeeded by
Nelson Piquet
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Mikko Kozarowitzky
Formula Vee Finland
1973
Succeeded by
Harry Nurminen
Preceded by
James Hunt
BRDC International Trophy winner
1978
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Preceded by
Nelson Piquet
Formula One World Champion
1982
Succeeded by
Nelson Piquet
Preceded by
Gilles Villeneuve
Brands Hatch Race of Champions winner
1983
Succeeded by
Incumbent
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