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The Khan Academy is a not-for-profit educational organisation created and sustained by former businessman Salman Khan. With the stated mission "of providing a high quality education to anyone, anywhere", the Academy supplies a free online collection of more than 1,200 videos[1] on mathematics, science, and economics.[2]

Salman Khan was born and raised in New Orleans. His parents were immigrants from what is now India and Bangladesh. Khan holds three degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology: a BS in mathematics, a BS in electrical engineering and computer science, and an MS in electrical engineering and computer science. He also holds an MBA from Harvard Business School. In late 2004, Khan began tutoring his niece in mathematics using Yahoo!'s Doodle notepad. When other relatives and friends sought his tutorage, he decided it would be more practical to distribute the tutorials on YouTube.[3][4] Their popularity there and the testimonials of appreciative students prompted Khan to quit his job in finance in 2008 and focus on the Academy full-time.[4]

As of December 2009, Khan's YouTube-hosted tutorials receive a total of more than 35,000 views per day.[4] Each video runs for approximately ten minutes, and is produced using video capture on Microsoft Paint. Khan eschewed a format that would involve a person standing by a whiteboard, desiring instead to present the content in a way "akin to sitting next to someone and working out a problem on a sheet of paper": "If you're watching a guy do a problem [while] thinking out loud, I think people find that more valuable and not as daunting".[5] Offline versions of the videos have been distributed by not-for-profit groups to rural areas in Asia, Latin America, and Africa.[3][6] While the Khan Academy's current content is mainly concerned with pre-college mathematics and physics, Khan states that his long-term goal is to provide "tens of thousands of videos in pretty much every subject" and to create "the world's first free, world-class virtual school".

The Khan Academy also provides a mathematics program that generates problems for students based on skill level and performance. Khan believes his academy points to an opportunity to overhaul the traditional classroom by using software to create tests, grade assignments, highlight the challenges of certain students, and encourage those doing well to help struggling classmates.[4]

In 2009, the Khan Academy received the Microsoft Tech Award for education.[6]

References

  1. ^ Spencer Michels (February 22, 2010). "Khan Academy: How to Calculate the Unemployment Rate". www.pbs.org. Public Broadcasting Service. http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2010/02/khan-academy-how-to-calculate-the-unemployment-rate.html. Retrieved February 22, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Khanacademy official website". http://www.khanacademy.org/. Retrieved 2009-12-23. 
  3. ^ a b "Frequently asked questions". Khanacademy.org. http://www.khanacademy.org/faq.jsp. Retrieved 2009-12-14. 
  4. ^ a b c d "Salman Khan, math master of the Internet". sfgate.com. 2009-12-14. http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2009/12/13/BUKV1B11Q1.DTL&tsp=1. Retrieved 2009-12-23. 
  5. ^ "Need a tutor? YouTube videos await". USA Today. 2008-12-12. http://www.usatoday.com/news/education/2008-12-11-youtube-tutoring_N.htm. Retrieved 2009-12-23. 
  6. ^ a b "2009 Education Award Laureate: Salman Khan". Techawards.org. http://www.techawards.org/laureates/stories/index.php?id=220. Retrieved 2009-12-14. 

External links

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The Khan Academy is a not-for-profit educational organization created and sustained by Salman Khan. With the stated mission "of providing a high quality education to anyone, anywhere", the Academy supplies a free online collection of more than 2,000 videos on mathematics, science, history, and economics.[1]

Contents

History

Salman Khan is a Bangladeshi American born and raised in New Orleans, Louisiana.[2] His father hails from Barisal, Bangladesh.[2][3] Khan holds three degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology: a BS in mathematics, a BS in electrical engineering and computer science, and an MS in electrical engineering and computer science. He also holds an MBA from Harvard Business School. In late 2004, Khan began tutoring his cousin in mathematics using Yahoo!'s Doodle notepad. When other relatives and friends sought his tutorage, he decided it would be more practical to distribute the tutorials on YouTube.[4][3] Their popularity there and the testimonials of appreciative students prompted Khan to quit his job in finance in 2009 and focus on the Academy full-time.[3]

As of December 2009, Khan's YouTube-hosted tutorials receive a total of more than 35,000 views per day.[3] Each video runs for approximately ten minutes. Drawings are made with SmoothDraw, which are recorded and produced using video capture from Camtasia Studio. Khan eschewed a format that would involve a person standing by a whiteboard, desiring instead to present the content in a way akin to sitting next to someone and working out a problem on a sheet of paper: If you're watching a guy do a problem [while] thinking out loud, I think people find that more valuable and not as daunting.[5] Offline versions of the videos have been distributed by not-for-profit groups to rural areas in Asia, Latin America, and Africa.[4][6] While the Khan Academy's current content is mainly concerned with pre-college mathematics and physics, Khan states that his long-term goal is to provide "tens of thousands of videos in pretty much every subject" and to create "the world's first free, world-class virtual school".

The Khan Academy also provides a web-based exercise system that generates problems for students based on skill level and performance. Khan believes his academy points to an opportunity to overhaul the traditional classroom by using software to create tests, grade assignments, highlight the challenges of certain students, and encourage those doing well to help struggling classmates.[3]

Several people have made $10,000 contributions; Ann and John Doerr gave $100,000; total revenue is about $150,000 in donations, and $2,000 a month from ads on the Web site.[7] As of September 2010, Google announced they would be providing the Khan Academy with $2 million to support the creation of more courses and to enable the Khan Academy to translate their core library into the world’s most widely spoken languages, as part of their Project 10^100.[8]

Vision

Major components:[9]

  • Video library (already over 1800 videos and counting in various topic areas - logging over 17 million visits[citation needed])
  • Automated exercises with continuous assessment (already over 70 modules mainly in math)
  • Peer-to-peer tutoring based on objective data collected by the system (future projected)
  • Khan Academy videos are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.[10]

Partner not-for-profit organizations are making the content available outside of YouTube. The Lewis Center for Educational Research, which is affiliated with NASA, is bringing the content into community colleges and charter schools around the country. World Possible is creating offline snapshots of the content to distribute in rural, developing regions with limited or no access to the Internet.[2][11]

He has a vision of turning the academy into a charter school:
This could be the DNA for a physical school where students spend 20 percent of their day watching videos and doing self-paced exercises and the rest of the day building robots or painting pictures or composing music or whatever.[7]

Recognition

References

  1. ^ Spencer Michels (February 22, 2010). "Khan Academy: How to Calculate the Unemployment Rate". www.pbs.org. Public Broadcasting Service. http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2010/02/khan-academy-how-to-calculate-the-unemployment-rate.html. Retrieved February 22, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c "Khan Academy". Khan Academy. http://www.khanacademy.org/faq.jsp. Retrieved 2010-07-06. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f Temple, James (2009-12-14). "Salman Khan, math master of the Internet". sfgate.com. http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2009/12/13/BUKV1B11Q1.DTL&tsp=1. Retrieved 2009-12-23. 
  4. ^ a b "Frequently asked questions". Khanacademy.org. http://www.khanacademy.org/faq.jsp. Retrieved 2009-12-14. 
  5. ^ "Need a tutor? YouTube videos await". USA Today. 2008-12-12. http://www.usatoday.com/news/education/2008-12-11-youtube-tutoring_N.htm. Retrieved 2009-12-23. 
  6. ^ a b "2009 Education Award Laureate: Salman Khan". Techawards.org. http://www.techawards.org/laureates/stories/index.php?id=220. Retrieved 2009-12-14. [verification needed]
  7. ^ a b Kowarski, Ilana (2010-06-06). "College 2.0: A Self-Appointed Teacher Runs a One-Man 'Academy' on YouTube - Technology - The Chronicle of Higher Education". Chronicle.com. http://chronicle.com/article/A-Self-Appointed-Teacher-Runs/65793/. Retrieved 2010-08-26. 
  8. ^ "$10 million for Project 10^100 winners". The Official Google Blog. 2010-09-24. http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2010/09/10-million-for-project-10100-winners.html. Retrieved 2010-09-24. 
  9. ^ "Khan Academy Vision and Social Return". http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wRf6XiEZ_Y8. Retrieved 2010-04-10. 
  10. ^ "Khan Academy". Khan Academy. http://www.khanacademy.org/. Retrieved 2010-07-06. 
  11. ^ "Partners". Worldpossible.org. http://www.worldpossible.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=26&Itemid=37. Retrieved 2010-07-06. 
  12. ^ "San Francisco Chronicle Article". Khan Academy. http://www.khanacademy.org/press/chronicle.html. Retrieved 2010-07-06. 
  13. ^ Author, Start (2010-02-22). "Khan Academy: How to Calculate the Unemployment Rate | The Rundown News Blog | PBS NewsHour". PBS. http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2010/02/khan-academy-how-to-calculate-the-unemployment-rate.html. Retrieved 2010-07-06. 
  14. ^ "Khan Academy". Khan Academy. http://www.khanacademy.org/faq.jsp#CNN. Retrieved 2010-07-06. 
  15. ^ David A. Kaplan (2010-08-24). "Bill Gates' favorite teacher". CNN. http://money.cnn.com/2010/08/23/technology/sal_khan_academy.fortune/index.htm. Retrieved 2010-09-25. 
  16. ^ "Project 10 to the 100". http://www.project10tothe100.com/index.html. Retrieved 2010-09-24. 

External links


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