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King Rat

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Bryan Forbes
Produced by James Woolf
Written by Bryan Forbes
James Clavell
Starring George Segal
Tom Courtenay
James Fox
Patrick O'Neal
Denholm Elliott
Music by John Barry
Cinematography Burnett Guffey
Editing by Walter Thompson
Distributed by Columbia Pictures
Release date(s) October 27, 1965
Running time 134 min
Country  United States
Language English

King Rat is a 1965 film version of the James Clavell novel King Rat. The film was directed by Bryan Forbes and starred George Segal as Corporal King. Among the supporting cast were John Mills, Tom Courtenay, James Fox and Leonard Rossiter.

The movie follows life in a POW camp in World War II. Some of the (mainly British) star cast are listed below.

Contents

Cast

Actor Role
George Segal Corporal Colin Henderson (aka "The King")
Tom Courtenay Lieutenant Robin Grey (camp provost marshal)
James Fox Peter Marlowe
Patrick O'Neal Top Sergeant Max (King's flunky)
Denholm Elliott Lieutenant G.D. Larkin
James Donald Doctor Kennedy
Todd Armstrong Tex
John Mills Colonel George Smedley-Taylor
Gerald Sim Lieutenant Colonel Jones (quartermaster)
Leonard Rossiter Major McCoy
Wright King Major Brough
John Standing Captain Daven
Alan Webb Colonel Brant
John Ronane Captain Hawkins
Sammy Reese Kurt
Michael Lees Stevens

Awards

It was nominated for Academy Awards for Cinematography (Burnett Guffey) and Art Direction (Robert Emmet Smith and Frank Tuttle). [1]

Trivia

George Segal's character is seen wearing the shoulder sleeve insignia of the U.S. Army's elite 34th Infantry Division, the feared Red Bulls. The 34ID fought the Germans during WWII, not the Japanese. It is highly unlikely that a member of the 34ID would have been transferred to the CBI or Pacific theater and seen action against the Japanese, and then get captured.

References

External links

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