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Kingsport, Tennessee (King's Port)
—  City  —
Nickname(s): The Model City
Location in the state of Tennessee
Coordinates: 36°32′13″N 82°32′32″W / 36.53694°N 82.54222°W / 36.53694; -82.54222Coordinates: 36°32′13″N 82°32′32″W / 36.53694°N 82.54222°W / 36.53694; -82.54222
Country United States
State Tennessee
Counties Sullivan, Hawkins
Mayor Dennis Phillips
Chartered; 1822
Rechartered: 1917
Area
 - City 45.0 sq mi (116.6 km2)
 - Land 44.1 sq mi (114.4 km2)
 - Water 0.9 sq mi (2.4 km2)
Elevation 1,211 ft (369 m)
Population (2000)[1]
 - City 44,905
 Density 1,018.9/sq mi (393.4/km2)
 Metro 480,091
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code(s) 423
FIPS code 47-39560[1]
GNIS feature ID 1303478[2]
Website http://www.ci.kingsport.tn.us

Kingsport is a city in Hawkins and Sullivan counties in the U.S. state of Tennessee. The majority of the city lies in Sullivan County. The population was 44,095 at the 2000 census.

The name is a simplification of "King's Port," originally referring to the area around Ross's Landing. Kingsport is a principal city of the Kingsport–BristolBristol, TN-VA Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), which had a population of 302,451 as of 2006.[3] The Metropolitan Statistical Area is a component of the Johnson City–Kingsport–Bristol, TN-VA Combined Statistical Area – commonly known as the "Tri-Cities" region. It is also commonly included in what is known as the "Mountain Empire," which includes a portion of southwest Virginia and the mountainous counties in Tennessee to the east.

Contents

History

Kingsport in 1937

The Long Island of the Holston River, today mostly within the corporate boundaries of Kingsport, was an important site for the Cherokee, colonial pioneers, and early settlers. Early settlements at the site were used as a staging ground for people taking the Wilderness Road leading to Kentucky through the Cumberland Gap. First chartered in 1822, Kingsport became an important shipping port on the Holston River. Goods originating for many miles from the surrounding countryside were loaded onto barges for the journey downriver to the Tennessee River at Knoxville. The young town lost its charter after a downturn its in fortunes precipitated by the Civil War. The name "Tennessee" originated from the old Yuchi Indian word, "Tana-see," meaning "The Meeting Place," which refers to The Long Island of the Holston River.

Re-chartered in 1917, Kingsport was an early example of a "garden city," designed by city planner and landscape architect John Nolen of Cambridge, Massachusetts. It carries the nickname The Model City from this plan, which organized the town into areas for commerce, churches, housing, and industry. The result included some of the earlier uses of traffic circles (roundabouts) in the U.S. Kingsport was among the first municipalities with a city manager form of government and a school system built on a model developed at Columbia University. Most of the land on the river was devoted to industry. Indeed, most of Long Island is now occupied by Eastman Chemical Company.

Geography

Kingsport is located at 36°32′13″N 82°32′32″W / 36.53694°N 82.54222°W / 36.53694; -82.54222 (36.536851, -82.542123)[4], at the intersection of U.S. highways 11 and 23. Kingsport is also the starting or ending point of Interstate 26.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 45.0 square miles (116.6 km²), of which, 44.1 square miles (114.1 km²) of it is land and 0.9 square miles (2.4 km²) of it (2.07%) is water.

Demographics

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 44,905 people, 19,662 households, and 12,642 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,018.9 people per square mile (393.4/km²). There were 21,796 housing units at an average density of 494.6/sq mi (191.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 93.32% White, 4.22% African American, 0.24% Native American, 0.79% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.34% from other races, and 1.06% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.05% of the population.

There were 19,662 households out of which 26.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.5% were married couples living together, 12.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.7% were non-families. 32.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.22 and the average family size was 2.80.

In the city the population was spread out with 21.7% under the age of 18, 6.5% from 18 to 24, 26.2% from 25 to 44, 25.3% from 45 to 64, and 20.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 84.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 79.4 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $30,524, and the median income for a family was $40,183. Males had a median income of $33,075 versus $23,217 for females. The per capita income for the city was $20,549. About 14.2% of families and 17.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.9% of those under age 18 and 13.0% of those age 65 or over.

Education

Residents of Kingsport are serviced by the Kingsport City Schools public school system, which operates seven elementary schools, two middle schools, and one high school. Kingsport is also home to eight private academies. The city is also part of Sullivan county which has 2 other high schools in Kingsport.

While no college or university houses its main campus within the city, Northeast State Technical Community College, East Tennessee State University, and University of Tennessee have branch campuses in Kingsport. List of Kingsport City Schools:

  • Andrew Jackson Elementary School
  • Andrew Johnson Elementary School
  • Abraham Lincoln Elementary School
  • Dobyns-Bennett High School
  • John F. Kennedy Elementary School
  • John Sevier Junior High School
  • Ross N. Robinson Junior High School
  • Theodore Roosevelt Elementary School
  • Thomas Jefferson Elementary School
  • George Washington Elementary School
  • John Adams Elementary School

The city is also home to the historic Douglass High School (Kingsport, Tennessee), the largest former African-American high school in upper East Tennessee, Southwest Virginia and Eastern Kentucky, at the time of its closing in 1966. The building that once housed the school, is, after an $8.1 million dollar renovation and expansion, now home to most of the city's non-profit agencies.[5]

Government

Board of Mayor and Alderman

Kingsport City uses the Council-Manager system which was established in 1917 when the city was re-chartered.

Kingsport is governed locally by a seven member Board of Mayor and Alderman (BMA). The citizens elect the mayor to a two year term and the 6 aldermen to four year terms. The elections take place on odd number years with the mayor and three aldermen elected every two years. New terms begin on the 1st of July. The Board then elects a Vice Mayor from the six aldermen. Currently the board is composed of Mayor Dennis Phillips, Vice Mayor Ben Mallicote, and Aldermen Ken Marsh, Larry Munsey, Pat Shull, Valerie Joh, and Jantry Shupe.[6] Tom Parham will replace Pat Shull on July 1 of 2009 [7]

State Government

The Sullivan County portion of Kingsport is represented in the Tennessee House of Representatives by the 1st and 2nd State Representative Districts, and the Hawkins County portion by the 6th district. Currently serving in these positions are Reps. Jon Lundberg, Tony Shipley, and Dale Ford respectively.[8] In the Tennessee State Senate, the Sullivan County portion of Kingsport is represented by the 2nd Senatorial District and the Hawkins County portion by the 4th district. Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey and State Senator Mike Faulk. All of these elected officials are members of the Republican Party.[9]

National Government

Kingsport as a whole is represented in the US House of Representatives by Republican Phil Roe of the 1st Congressional District.[10]

Civil War History

In the Battle of Kingsport (December 1864) during the American Civil War (1861–1865), a force of 300 Confederates under Colonel Richard Morgan CSA (b.1836, d.1918) stopped a larger Union force for nearly two days. An army of over 5,500 troops under command of Major General George Stoneman USA (b.1822, d.1894) had left Knoxville, Tennessee, to raid Confederate targets in Virginia: the salt works at Saltville, the lead works at Wytheville and the iron works in Marion. While Col. Morgan's small band held off a main Union force under Major General Cullem Gillem USA on the opposite side the Holston River, Col. Samuel Patton USA took a force of cavalry to a ford in the river 2.5 miles (4.0 km) north and came down behind the Confederates. Out-numbered, out-flanked and demoralised by the bitter winter weather, Col. Morgan surrendered. The Confederates suffered 18 dead, and 84 prisoners of war were sent to Union prison in Knoxville. (Source: Thomas R. Ramsey, Jr., "The Raid," (Kingsport Press, 1973))

Odd History

Kingsport residents demanded the death of Mary for her 1916 killing of Walter "Red" Eldridge.

On September 12, 1916, Kingsport residents demanded the death of circus elephant Mary (a five ton Asian elephant who performed in the Sparks World Famous Shows Circus) for her killing of a city hotel worker named Walter "Red" Eldridge, who was hired the day before as an assistant elephant trainer by the circus.

On the evening of September 12, Eldridge was killed by Mary in Kingsport, Tennessee while taking her to a nearby pond. There are several accounts of his death but the most widely accepted version is that he prodded her behind the ear with a hook after she reached down to nibble on a watermelon rind. She went into a rage, snatched Eldridge with her trunk, threw him against a drink stand and deliberately stepped on his head, crushing it. Mary was impounded by the local sheriff, and the leaders of several nearby towns threatened not to allow the circus to visit if Mary was included. The circus owner, Charlie Sparks, reluctantly decided that the only way to quickly resolve the situation was to hold a public execution. On the following day, she was transported by rail to Erwin, Tennessee where a crowd of over 2,500 people assembled in the Clinchfield Railroad yard to watch her hanging from a railroad crane.

Business

  • Pal's Sudden Service, a regional fast-food restaurant chain, opened its first location in Kingsport.

Military

  • The vessel SS Kingsport Victory, which later became USNS Kingsport, was named in honor of the city.

Notable natives and residents

Local media

Newspaper:

Television:

Radio:

Kingsport Police Department

Kingsport Police Department
Abbreviation KPD
Agency overview
Legal personality Governmental: Government agency
Jurisdictional structure
Operations jurisdiction* City of Kingsport in the state of Tennessee, United States
General nature
Operational structure
Sworn members 99
Unsworn members 57
Agency executive Gail Osborne, Chief
Website
http://police.kingsporttn.gov
Footnotes
* Divisional agency: Division of the country, over which the agency has usual operational jurisdiction.

Kingsport Police Department is the municipal law enforcement agency for Kingsport, Tennessee.[11] The current chief is Gail Osborne.[12]

As of 2006, The KPD consists of 104 sworn officers, 44 full-time non-sworn officers, and 17 part-time non sworn officers.[13] The budget for 2005 was $8,602,800.[14] The KPD has twelve SWAT members that train regularly. KPD SWAT responded to thirteen emergency calls during 2005.[15]

Sports

The Kingsport Mets of the Appalachian League, a rookie-level league, play in the city. An affiliate of the New York Mets, the team has competed in the city since 1969, with the exception of 1983. The Mets play in Hunter Wright Stadium named after Mayor Hunter Wright.

References

Further reading

  • Long, Howard. Kingsport: A Romance of Industry. Overmountain Press (October 1993) ISBN 0932807895
  • Spoden, Muriel Millar Clark. The Long Island of the Holston: Sacred Island of the Cherokee Nation. ASIN: B0006WOGAM
  • Wolfe, Margaret Ripley. Kingsport Tennessee: A Planned American City. University Press of Kentucky (November 1987) ISBN 0813116244

External links


Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010
(Redirected to Kingsport article)

From Wikitravel

Kingsport is a city in Eastern Tennessee.

Get in

By plane

Tri-Cities Regional Airport [1]

By car

Interstates I-81 and I-26. (I-26 may be shown as I-181 on older maps or GPS navigators.) U.S. Highways 11-W and 23

Get around

Kingsport has a public transit system with buses that resemble trolley cars. Routes cover downtown, major employers and major shopping areas.

Driving about is easy. Traffic is much lighter than in most cities. Residents do tend to be lax about using turn signals.

  • Up Against the Wall Gallery, 316 East Market St, +1 423 246-7210. One of the largest galleries in the Southeast features lamps, jewelry, pottery, and unique custom framing.
  • Meadowview Regional Art Collection, 1901 Meadowview Pkwy, +1 423 578-6600. A collection of original art by regional artists.
  • Exchange Place, 4812 Orebank Rd. A living history farm.
  • The Netherland Inn, The Nation's only registered historical site which was both a stage stop and a boatyard. The restored Netherland Inn and section of the Old Historic Boatyard depict an intimate study of a way of life that is intriguing part of America's heritage.
  • Hammond House, Visit this fully restored late-Victorian house on the National Register of Historic Places for a glimpse of the architecture and life-style of this era. See antique furnishings including a fainting couch, working foot-pump organ, working Edison phonograph, wood-burning heat stove and (electrified) wood-burning cook stove and others.
  • Daniel Boone Wilderness Trail, 2144 Netherland Inn Rd, [2]. One of the nation's most historic routes, the Wilderness Trail was blazed by Daniel Boone in 1775.
  • The DKA Gallery, 140 West Main St, +1 423 246-6550, [3]. The DKA Gallery is a non-profit contemporary fine art gallery created in partnership with the Madison Art Center in Nashville.
  • Bays Mountain Park [4]
  • Listen to free bluegrass concerts on Broad Street on summer Friday evenings.
  • Listen to free blues/rock/gospel concerts on Broad Street on summer Thursday evenings.
  • There is a playhouse in nearby Bristol, which also has the famous racetrack hosting major NASCAR and NHRA events.
  • The Kingsport Rennaissance Center has periodic plays.
  • Visit Boat Yard/Riverfront Park, Netherland Inn Rd, Kingsport, TN 37660, 423-229-9457,

This section of the Greenbelt Linear Park includes a swinging bridge, picnic area, playground, jogging/bicycle path, fishing and historical markers.

  • Ride horses at Warriors' Path Riding Stables, 490 Hemlock Park, Kingsport, TN 37663-2073, 423-323-8543,

Enjoy guided trail rides with beautiful woodland scenery.

  • Many events, shows, festivals of various types throughout the year. See the "GoTriCities" section of the Kingsport Times News on Thursdays for listings.

Buy

Most of the major retailers have outlets here, primarily along Stone Drive (US Route 11W) or at the Fort Henry Mall.

  • The Chop House, [5]. Kingsport's #1 restaurant for great steaks and chops in a warm, friendly environment.
  • Pal's, [6]. Malcolm Baldridge award-winner and great fast-food.

Many of the major national chain eateries are here also (Cheddars, Lone Star Steakhouse, Fatz, Perkins, etc.)

Drink

Clubs and bars with live entertainment in and around Kingsport include Acoustic Coffeehouse, Pickin' Porch, Bistro 105, River's Edge Restaurant, Bridges Cafe, Cahootenanny's, Gatsby's, Stir Fry Cafe, Nashville Sound, Country's Stateline Tavern, Picasso's.

  • Kaffe Blue, Broad Street. A wonderful little coffee house that serves great sandwiches and salads. Great seating in the windows! Serves lunch and breakfast.  edit
  • Kingsport Grocery Company, 453 E. Main St., [7]. The regions best craft-brewed beer selection (over 115) including high-gravities  edit
  • Holiday Inn Express Hotel & Suites, 1217 Stewball Cr, +1 423 723-2300, [8].
  • MeadowView Conference Resort & Convention Center, 1901 Meadowview Pkwy, +1 423 578-6600 (fax: +1 423 578-6630), [9].
  • Fox Manor Bed & Breakfast, [10] 1612 Watauga St.
This is a usable article. It has information for getting in as well as some complete entries for restaurants and hotels. An adventurous person could use this article, but please plunge forward and help it grow!

Simple English

Kingsport, Tennessee (King's Port)
—  City  —
Nickname(s): The Model City
Coordinates: 36°32′13″N 82°32′32″W / 36.53694°N 82.54222°W / 36.53694; -82.54222Coordinates: 36°32′13″N 82°32′32″W / 36.53694°N 82.54222°W / 36.53694; -82.54222
Country United States
State Tennessee
Counties Sullivan, Hawkins
Mayor Dennis Phillips
Chartered; 1822
Rechartered: 1917
Area
 - City 45.0 sq mi (116.6 km2)
 - Land 44.1 sq mi (114.4 km2)
 - Water 0.9 sq mi (2.4 km2)
Elevation 1,211 ft (369 m)
Population (2000)[1]
 - City 44,905
 Density 1,018.9/sq mi (393.4/km2)
 Metro 480,091
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code(s) 423
FIPS code 47-39560[1]
GNIS feature ID 1303478[2]
Website http://www.ci.kingsport.tn.us

Kingsport is a city in Hawkins and Sullivan counties in the U.S. state of Tennessee. The large part of the city is in Sullivan County. The population was 44,095 at the 2000 census.

The name is based on "King's Port" which referred to the area around Ross's Landing. It is part of what is known as the "Mountain Empire," which includes a portion of southwest Virginia and the mountainous counties in Tennessee to the east.

Contents

Geography

Kingsport is located at 36°32′13″N 82°32′32″W / 36.53694°N 82.54222°W / 36.53694; -82.54222 (36.536851, -82.542123)[3] where U.S. highways 11 and 23 meet. Kingsport is also the starting and ending point of Interstate 26.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 45.0 square miles (116.6 km²), of which, 44.1 square miles (114.1 km²) of it is land and 0.9 square miles (2.4 km²) of it (2.07%) is water.

Education

People who live in Kingsport use the Kingsport City Schools public school system. The system has seven elementary schools, two middle schools, and one high school. Kingsport is also home to eight private academies. The city is also part of Sullivan county which has 2 other high schools in Kingsport.

While no college or university houses its main campus within the city, Northeast State Technical Community College, East Tennessee State University, and University of Tennessee have branch campuses in Kingsport.

Notable natives and residents

  • Lisa Alther, American author, born and grew up in Kingsport
  • Edward L. Ayers, Bancroft Prize-winning historian and ninth president of the University of Richmond, raised in Kingsport
  • Barry Bales, Grammy Award winning musician with Alison Krauss and Union Station
  • Amy Dalley, country music artist
  • Bobby Dodd, College Football Hall of Fame inductee as both a football player (University of Tennessee) and coach (Georgia Institute of Technology)
  • Bobby Eaton, professional wrestler
  • Cliff Kresge, a PGA Tour player who splits his time between homes in Kingsport and Florida
  • Cripple Clarence Lofton, noted boogie-woogie pianist and singer, was born in Kingsport.
  • Brownie McGhee and Stick McGhee, brothers and blues musicians, grew up in Kingsport and other East Tennessee towns.
  • Ken Mellons, country music artist
  • John Palmer, former NBC News correspondent, born in Kingsport and a graduate of Dobyns-Bennett High School
  • George Sells, news anchor now working at WAFB in Baton Rouge, was born and raised in Kingsport.
  • John Shelton Reed, sociologist and essayist, author or editor of eighteen books, most of them dealing with the contemporary American South.
  • Gerald Sensabaugh, defensive back for the NFL team Dallas Cowboys
  • LeRoy Sprankle, high school multi-sport coach, author, and general manager of the Canton Independents
  • Steven Williams, actor who starred in 21 Jump Street and The Blues Brothers.

Sports

The Kingsport Mets of the Appalachian League, a rookie-level league, play in the city. They are an affiliate of the New York Mets. The team has competed in the city since 1969, with the exception of 1983. The Mets play in Hunter Wright Stadium named after Mayor Hunter Wright.

References

Further reading

  • Long, Howard. Kingsport: A Romance of Industry. Overmountain Press (October 1993) ISBN 0932807895
  • Spoden, Muriel Millar Clark. The Long Island of the Holston: Sacred Island of the Cherokee Nation. ASIN: B0006WOGAM
  • Wolfe, Margaret Ripley. Kingsport Tennessee: A Planned American City. University Press of Kentucky (November 1987) ISBN 0813116244

Other websites








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