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Klebsiella pneumoniae
Classification and external resources

K. pneumoniae on a MacConkey agar plate.
ICD-10 B96.1, J15.0
ICD-9 041.3, 482.0
DiseasesDB 7181
eMedicine med/1237
MeSH D007710

Klebsiella pneumonia is a form of bacterial pneumonia associated with Klebsiella pneumoniae.

It is typically due to aspiration by alcoholics, though it is more commonly implicated in hospital-acquired urinary tract and wound infections, particularly in immunocompromised individuals and diabetics.

Contents

Presentation

Patients with Klebsiella pneumonia tend to cough up a characteristic sputum that is said to resemble "red-currant jelly".

Klebsiella pneumonia tends to affect people with underlying diseases, such as alcoholism, diabetes and chronic lung disease.

Treatment

Treatment for Klebsiella pneumonia is by antibiotics such as aminoglycosides and cephalosporins, the choice depending upon the patient’s health condition, medical history and severity of the disease.[1]

However, Klebsiella possesses a chromosomal class A beta-lactamase giving it resistance to ampicillin. Many strains have acquired an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase with additional resistance to carbenicillin, amoxiciline, and increasingly to ceftazidime. The bacteria remain largely susceptible to aminoglycosides and cephalosporins. Varying degrees of inhibition of the beta-lactamase with clavulanic acid have been reported. Infections due to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens in the ICU have invoked the re-emergence of colistin, an antibiotic that had rarely been used for decades. However, colistin-resistant strains of K. pneumoniae have been reported in Greek ICUs.[2]

For Klebsiella in Taiwan, it is abnormally toxic and cause liver abscess in DM pateint. It also required 3rd generation cephalosporin empirically.

Eponym

Community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae may be called Friedländer's Pneumonia, after Carl Friedländer.

References

  1. ^ Buzzle --> Klebsiella Pneumoniae By Ningthoujam Sandhyarani. Published: 12/16/2008
  2. ^ Antoniadou, A. et al. (2006). Colistin-resistant isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae emerging in intensive care unit patients: first report of a multiclonal cluster. The Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. Retrieved on April 28, 2007 from http://jac.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/dkl562v1.
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