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Województwo krakowskie
Coat of Arms
Coat of Arms
Kraków Voivodeship
Historical region Volhynia

Kraków Voivodeship (Polish: województwo krakowskie) - a unit of administrative division and local government in Poland in years 1919–1939. Back then, it covered a big chunk of southern part of the country, including such cities as Kraków, Jaworzno and Tarnów. Capital city: Kraków.

Contents

Location and area

In early 1939, Voivodeship's area was 17 560 square kilometers. It was located in southern Poland, bordering Autonomous Silesian Voivodeship to the west, Kielce Voivodeship to the north, Lublin Voivodeship, Lwów Voivodeship to the east and Slovakia to the south. Landscape was hilly in the northern part and mountainous in south, with the Tatra Mountains located in the very south of the area. Forests covered 20.9%, with the national average 22.2% (as for January 1, 1937).

Population

According to the 1931 Polish census, the population was 2 300 100. Poles were 91.3% of the population, Jews - 5.6% and Ukrainians - 2.5%. The Jews preferred to live in the cities and towns; in 1931 they made 19.2% of Voivodeship's city inhabitants. Illiteracy (in 1931) was 13.7%, lower than the national average of 23.1%.

Industry

Kraków Voivodeship was very divided in industrial terms. Its western part, with such cities as Jaworzno, Chrzanów or Trzebinia, was to a large degree industrialized and urbanized, with some coalmines. Also Kraków and Tarnów were big industrial centers. Eastern part, on the other hand, was backward, with little industry and underdeveloped agriculture. In mid-1930s Polish government started a huge public works program, called Centralny Okręg Przemysłowy, which was a great boost to overpopulated and poor central and eastern counties.

Cities and administrative divisions

In 1938, it consisted of 18 powiats (counties). These were as follows:

  • Biala Krakowska county (area 635 km², population 139 100),
  • Bochnia county (area 877 km², population 113 800),
  • Brzesko county (area 849 km², population 102 200),
  • Chrzanów county (area 722 km², population 138 100),
  • Dąbrowa Tarnowska county (area 650 km², population 66 700),
  • Dębica county (area 1 141 km², population 110 900),
  • Gorlice county (area 1 082 km², population 104 800),
  • Jasło county (area 1 055 km², population 116 100),
  • city of Kraków county (powiat krakowski grodzki), (area 48 km², population 219 300),
  • Kraków county (area 884 km², population 187 500),
  • Limanowa county (area 944 km², population 87 300),
  • Mielec county (area 901 km², population 77 500),
  • Myślenice county (area 988 km², population 102 700),
  • Nowy Sącz county (area 1 572 km², population 183 900),
  • Nowy Targ county (area 2 069 km², population 131 800),
  • Tarnów county (area 881 km², population 142 400),
  • Wadowice county (area 1 109 km², population 145 100),
  • Żywiec county (area 1 337 km², population 130 900).

According to the 1931 census, biggest cities within the Voivodeship's boundaries were:

  • Kraków (pop. 219 300),
  • Tarnów (pop. 44 900),
  • Nowy Sącz (pop. 30 300),
  • Biala Krakowska (pop. 22 700),
  • Jaworzno (pop. 19 100),
  • Chrzanów (pop. 17 900),
  • Zakopane (pop. 16 300),
  • Bochnia (pop. 12 100),
  • Oświęcim (pop. 12 000).

Voivodes

  • Kazimierz Junosza-Gałecki 1 September 1921 – 19 December 1923
  • Karol Olpiński 6 November 1923 – 16 November 1923 (acting)
  • Władysław Kowalikowski 16 November 1923 – 7 July 1926 (acting till 19 December 1923 or 8 March 1924 ?)
  • Ludwik Darowski 1 July 1926 – 31 December 1928
  • Mikołaj Kwaśniewski 1 January 1929 – 25 June 1935
  • Władysław Raczkiewicz 10 August 1935 – 13 October 1935
  • Kazimierz Świtalski 3 December 1935 – 20 April 1936
  • Michał Gnoiński 22 April 1936 – 8 September 1937
  • Józef Tymiński 9 September 1937 – September 1939

See also

References

  • Maly rocznik statystyczny 1939, Nakladem Glownego Urzedu Statystycznego, Warszawa 1939 (Concise Statistical Year-Book of Poland, Warsaw 1939).

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