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Basketball current event.png For current information on this topic, see 2009-10 LSU Tigers men's basketball team.
LSU Tigers
LSU Tigers athletic logo

University Louisiana State University
Conference SEC
Location Baton Rouge, LA
Head coach Trent Johnson (1st year)
Arena Pete Maravich Assembly Center
(Capacity: 13,472)
Nickname Tigers
Colors Purple and Gold

             

Uniforms
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Home jersey
Team colours
Home
Kit body thingoldsides.png
Away jersey
Kit shorts thingoldsides.png
Team colours
Away
Pre-tournament era champions
1935
NCAA Tournament Final Four
1953, 1981, 1986, 2006
NCAA Tournament Elite Eight
1953, 1980, 1981, 1986, 1987, 2006
NCAA Tournament Sweet Sixteen
1953, 1954, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1986, 1987, 2000, 2006
NCAA Tournament appearances
1953, 1954, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006,2009
Conference tournament champions
1980
Conference regular season champions
1935, 1953, 1954, 1979, 1981, 1985, 1991, 2000, 2006, 2009

The Louisiana State Tigers basketball team represents Louisiana State University in NCAA Division I men's college basketball. The team is currently coached by Trent Johnson and has enjoyed recent success, including a Final Four run in the 2005–2006 season. Past coaches include John Brady, Press Maravich, Dale Brown and Harry Rabenhorst. They play their home games in the Pete Maravich Assembly Center located on the LSU campus in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The team participates in the West division of the Southeastern Conference.

Contents

History

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Early history (1909–1957)

In the days before the NCAA Tournament, the Tigers won a 1935 mythical national championship by winning the American Legion Bowl (one of several mythical championships awarded that year), under head coach Harry Rabenhorst. While this championship is not officially recognized by the NCAA since it did not sanction a tournament, LSU officially claims this championship and displays a banner in the Pete Maravich Assembly Center. Rabenhorst also led the Tigers to the 1953 Final Four with a team that included future NBA Hall of Famer Bob Pettit. LSU is the only school that officially claims an American Legion Bowl championship.

Tough times (1957–1966)

Maravich's in town (1966–1972)

Pistol Pete dominated the collegiate levels at LSU. Despite averaging over 44 points per game, Pete never won a championship (SEC, NIT, or NCAA) and never played in the NCAA Tournament.

Dale Brown era (1972–1997)

In September 2007, Lester Earl issued an apology to Brown, then-assistant head coach Johnny Jones, and LSU in general for his role in the NCAA investigation. Earl now claims that the NCAA pressured him into making false claims against Dale Brown or else he would lose years of NCAA eligibility."I was pressured into telling them SOMETHING. I was 19 years old at that time. The NCAA intimidated me, manipulated me into making up things, and basically encouraged me to lie, in order to be able to finish my playing career at Kansas. They told me if we don't find any dirt on Coach Brown you won't be allowed to play but one more year at Kansas. I caused great harm, heartache and difficulties for so many people. I feel sorriest for hurting Coach Brown. Coach Brown, I apologize to you for tarnishing your magnificent career at LSU."

The NCAA has declined any new comments on the situation. However, Brown says that he has forgiven Earl.

"The most interesting journey that a person can make is discovering himself. I believe Lester has done that, and I forgive him."

John Brady era (1997–2008)

In 1997, John Brady replaced the legendary Dale Brown as head coach at LSU. When Brady arrived, the program was under probation and stinging from a recruiting scandal. Brady's first two years were rough.

In 2000, the Tigers broke through, posting a 28–6 record and a NCAA Tournament Sweet 16 appearance. However, due to the loss of Stromile Swift and Jabari Smith to the 2000 NBA Draft, the Tigers could not carry their momentum to the next year, going 13-16 in 2001.

Brady's team entered the 2005–06 season unranked, but were coming off a solid season in which they went 20–10 and made the NCAA Tournament. Led by Glen "Big Baby" Davis and Tyrus Thomas, the Tigers won their first outright SEC regular season championship since 1985, and earned a #4 seed in the NCAA Tournament. After wins over Iona and Texas A&M, LSU defeated the #1 seed Duke and #2 seed Texas to make it to their first Final Four since 1986. Set at the RCA Dome in Indianapolis, Indiana, the 2006 Final Four was the first since 1980 to feature no #1 seeds (LSU, #2 UCLA, #3 Florida and #11 George Mason). Facing the #2 seed Bruins in the national semifinals, the Tigers were unable to solve UCLA's defense, losing 59-45, dropping LSU to 0-6 all-time in the men's Final Four (and 0-11 in all Final Four games, including an 0-5 mark in the women's Final Four). Despite the loss, the 2005-06 season will be remembered as one of the most successful in LSU men's basketball history. John Brady was fired in the middle of his 11th season as LSU's head basketball coach and just two seasons after the Tigers' latest Final Four appearance.

On February 8, 2008, Brady was fired from LSU. Earlier news reports stated that he would coach the Tennessee game on February 9th, but LSU officials stated that his termination is immediate. Brady's assistant coach, Butch Pierre, took over as the interim head coach.[1][2]

In 10 and a half seasons at LSU, Brady compiled a 192–139 record, including two SEC titles and four NCAA tournament appearances.

National Award winners

National Player of the Year

"Pistol" Pete Maravich, is still the all-time leading NCAA Division I scorer with 3,667 points scored and an average of 44.2 points per game.[3]
Year Player
1969 Pete Maravich
1970 Pete Maravich
1991 Shaquille O'Neal

National Coach of the Year

Year Coach
1981 Dale Brown

Prominent players

Members of the Basketball Hall of Fame

Player Position Years @ LSU Induction
Bob Pettit Power forward 1950–1954 1971
Pete Maravich Guard 1966–1970 1987

SEC Player of the Year

Player Year(s)
Pete Maravich 1968, 1969, 1970
Durand "Rudy" Macklin 1981
Chris Jackson 1989, 1990
Shaquille O'Neal 1991, 1992
Stromile Swift 2000
Brandon Bass 2005
Glen Davis 2006
Marcus Thornton 2009

Other prominent players

Player Position Years @ LSU
Tyrus Thomas Power forward 2005–2006
Shaquille O'Neal Center 1989–1992
Glen Davis Forward 2004–2007
Chris Jackson Guard 1989–1990
Stromile Swift Power forward 1998–2000
Brandon Bass Power forward
Jabari Smith Centre/Power forward 1998–2000
Jerry Reynolds
Frank Brian
Stanley Roberts 1988–1990
Randy Livingston 1995–1996
Geert Hammink Center 1989–1993
Durand "Rudy" Macklin
Ronald Dupree
Don Redden 1982–1986
Ricky Blanton 1984–1989
Howard Carter 1979–1983
John Sam Williams 1985–1986
Joe Dean Guard 1949–1952
Jordy Hultberg Guard 1976–1980
Darrell Mitchell Point Guard 2002–2006

Head coaches

Name Years Record
Edgar Wingard 1909–1909 5-2
John W. Mayhew 1909–1911 11-4
F.M. Long 1911–1913 6-9
C. C. Stroud 1913–1918 63-19
R.E. Edmonds 1918–1919 1-0
C. C. Stroud 1919–1920 19-2
Branch Bocock 1920–1921 19-4
Frank "Tad" Gormley 1921–1923 25-11
"Moon" Ducote 1923–1924 8-12
H.E. Gob Wilson 1924–1925 10-7
Harry Rabenhorst 1925–1942 181-134
Dale Morey 1942–1944 28-19
Jesse Fatheree 1944–1945 11-7
A.L. Swanson 1944–1945 4-2
Harry Rabenhorst 1945–1957 159-130
Jay McCreary 1957–1965 82-115
Frank Truitt 1965–1966 6-20
Press Maravich 1966–1972 76-86
Dale Brown 1972–1997 448-301
John Brady 1997–2008 167-111
Butch Pierre (interim) 2008 5-5
Trent Johnson 2008– 27-8

Year-by-year results

Season Coach Overall
Record
Conference
Record
Notes
Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association
1909 Edgar Wingard 5-2 2-0
1910 John W. Mayhew 3-1 2-0
1911 John W. Mayhew 8-3 6-1
1912 F.M. Long 4-6 2-3
1913 F.M. Long 2-3 1-3
1913-1914 C. C. Stroud 7-5 0-4
1914-1915 C.C. Stroud 10-1 3-1
1915-1916 C.C. Stroud 14-10 6-7
1916-1917 C.C. Stroud 20-2 11-0
1917-1918 C.C. Stroud 12-1 3-0
1919 R.E. Edmonds 1-0 0-0
1919-1920 C.C. Stroud 19-2 8-2
Southern Conference
1921 Branch Bocock 19-4 5-2
1922 Frank "Tad" Gormley 15-1 3-1
1922-1923 Frank "Tad" Gormley 10-10 0-6
1924 "Moon" Ducote 8-12 0-7
1925 H.E. Gob Wilson 10-7 1-4
1926 Harry Rabenhorst 9-9 4-5
1927 Harry Rabenhorst 7-9 3-5
1928 Harry Rabenhorst 14-4 7-3
1929 Harry Rabenhorst 8-13 5-9
1930 Harry Rabenhorst 10-11 6-7
1931 Harry Rabenhorst 7-8 4-4
1932 Harry Rabenhorst 11-9 8-8
Southeastern Conference
1933 Harry Rabenhorst 15-8 13-7
1934 Harry Rabenhorst 13-4 13-3
1935 Harry Rabenhorst 14-1 12-0 SEC Champions; National Champions
1935-1936 Harry Rabenhorst 10-10 9-6
1936-1937 Harry Rabenhorst 13-7 7-6
1937-1938 Harry Rabenhorst 10-10 7-6
1938-1939 Harry Rabenhorst 13-7 10-5
1939-1940 Harry Rabenhorst 10-8 8-4
1940-1941 Harry Rabenhorst 9-9 7-5
1941-1942 Harry Rabenhorst 8-7 8-3
1942-1943 Dale Morey 18-4 11-2
1943-1944 Dale Morey 10-15 0-4
1944-1945 Jesse Fatheree (first 18 games)
A.L. Swanson (last 6 games)
15-9 3-3
1945-1946 Harry Rabenhorst 18-3 8-0
1946-1947 Harry Rabenhorst 17-4 8-2
1947-1948 Harry Rabenhorst 8-18 4-8
1948-1949 Harry Rabenhorst 15-10 7-6
1949-1950 Harry Rabenhorst 13-12 5-8
1950-1951 Harry Rabenhorst 10-14 7-8
1951-1952 Harry Rabenhorst 17-7 9-6
1952-1953 Harry Rabenhorst 22-3 13-0 SEC Champions; NCAA Final Four
1953-1954 Harry Rabenhorst 20-5 14-0 SEC Champions
1954-1955 Harry Rabenhorst 6-18 3-11
1955-1956 Harry Rabenhorst 7-17 5-9
1956-1957 Harry Rabenhorst 6-19 1-13
1957-1958 Jay McCreary 7-18 3-11
1958-1959 Jay McCreary 10-15 2-12
1959-1960 Jay McCreary 5-18 3-11
1960-1961 Jay McCreary 11-14 6-8
1961-1962 Jay McCreary 13-11 7-7
1962-1963 Jay McCreary 12-12 5-9
1963-1964 Jay McCreary 12-13 8-6
1964-1965 Jay McCreary 12-14 7-9
1965-1966 Frank Truitt 6-20 2-14
1966-1967 Press Maravich 3-23 1-17
1967-1968 Press Maravich 14-12 8-10
1968-1969 Press Maravich 13-13 7-11
1969-1970 Press Maravich 22-10 13-5 NIT Final Four
1970-1971 Press Maravich 14-12 10-8
1971-1972 Press Maravich 10-16 6-12
1972-1973 Dale Brown 14-10 9-9
1973-1974 Dale Brown 12-14 6-12
1974-1975 Dale Brown 10-16 6-12
1975-1976 Dale Brown 12-14 5-13
1976-1977 Dale Brown 15-12 8-10
1977-1978 Dale Brown 18-9 12-6
1978-1979 Dale Brown 23-6 14-4 SEC Champions; NCAA Sweet Sixteen
1979-1980 Dale Brown 26-6 14-4 SEC Tournament Champions; NCAA Elite Eight
1980-1981 Dale Brown 31-5 17-1 SEC Champions; NCAA Final Four
1981-1982 Dale Brown 14-14 11-7 NIT First Round
1982-1983 Dale Brown 19-13 10-8 NIT First Round
1983-1984 Dale Brown 18-11 11-7 NCAA First Round
1984-1985 Dale Brown 19-10 13-5 SEC Champions; NCAA First Round
1985-1986 Dale Brown 26-12 9-9 NCAA Final Four
1986-1987 Dale Brown 24-15 8-10 NCAA Elite Eight
1987-1988 Dale Brown 16-14 10-8 NCAA First Round
1988-1989 Dale Brown 20-12 11-7 NCAA First Round
1989-1990 Dale Brown 23-9 12-6 NCAA Second Round
1990-1991 Dale Brown 20-10 13-5 SEC Champions; NCAA First Round
1991-1992 Dale Brown 21-10 12-4 NCAA Second Round
1992-1993 Dale Brown 22-11 9-7 NCAA First Round
1993-1994 Dale Brown 11-16 5-11
1994-1995 Dale Brown 12-15 6-10
1995-1996 Dale Brown 12-17 4-12
1996-1997 Dale Brown 10-20 3-13
1997-1998 John Brady 9-18 2-14
1998-1999 John Brady 12-15 4-12
1999-2000 John Brady 28-6 12-4 SEC Champions; NCAA Sweet Sixteen
2000-2001 John Brady 13-16 2-14
2001-2002 John Brady 19-15 6-10 NIT Second Round
2002-2003 John Brady 21-11 8-8 NCAA First Round
2003-2004 John Brady 18-11 8-8 NIT First Round
2004-2005 John Brady 20-10 12-4 NCAA First Round
2005-2006 John Brady 27-9 14-2 SEC Champions; NCAA Final Four
2006-2007 John Brady 17-15 5-11
2007-2008 John Brady (first 21 games)
Butch Pierre (last 10 games)
8-13
5-5
1-6
5-5
2008-2009 Trent Johnson 27-8 13-3 SEC Champions; NCAA Second Round

NCAA Tournament history & seeds

The NCAA began seeding the tournament with the 1979 edition.

Years → '79 '80 '81 '82 '83 '84 '85 '86 '87 '88 '89 '90 '91 '92 '93 '94 '95 '96 '97 '98 '99 '00 '01 '02 '03 '04 '05 '06 '07 '08 '09
Seeds → 3 1 1 - - 7 4 11 10 9 10 5 6 7 11 - - - - - - 4 - - 8 - 6 4 - - 8

Prior to seeding LSU appeared in the 1953 and 1954 NCAA Tournaments.

The 1986 team is the lowest-seeded team ever to advance to the Final Four, along with George Mason in 2006.

References

External links


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