The Full Wiki

More info on Laban Wheaton

Laban Wheaton: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Laban Wheaton


Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 9th district
In office
March 4, 1809 – March 3, 1815
Preceded by Josiah Dean
Succeeded by John Reed, Jr.

In office
1825 – 1825

In office
1803 – 1808

Chief Justice of the
Court of Sessions for Bristol County
In office
May 25, 1819 – 1820
Preceded by Josiah Dean[1]
Succeeded by Office Abolished

Chief Justice of
The Court of Common Pleas of Bristol County
In office
May 18, 1810 – May 25, 1819

Judge of the Bristol County Court

Born March 13, 1754
Mansfield, Massachusetts
Died March 23, 1846
Norton, Massachusetts
Resting place Norton Cemetery
Political party Federalist
Children Laban M. Wheaton[2]
Alma mater Harvard

Laban Wheaton (March 13, 1754 - March 23, 1846) was a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts.

Born in Mansfield, Massachusetts, Wheaton attended Wrentham (Massachusetts) Academy. He was graduated from Harvard College in 1774. He studied theology under private instructor at Woodstock, Connecticut. He also studied law. He was admitted to the bar in 1788 and commenced practice in Milton, Massachusetts. He served as judge of the Bristol County Court. He served as member of the State house of representatives 1803-1808 and again in 1825.

Wheaton was elected as a Federalist to the Eleventh and to the three succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1809-March 3, 1817). He was appointed chief justice of the court of common pleas of Bristol County May 18, 1810, which position he held until appointed chief justice of the court of sessions for Bristol County[3] on May 25, 1819, but this court was abolished in 1820.[4] He died in Norton, Massachusetts, March 23, 1846. He was interred in Norton Cemetery.

References

Notes

  1. ^ Davis, William Thomas (1895), Bench and bar of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Volume 2, Boston, MA: The Boson History Company, pp. 237–238.  
  2. ^ Davis, William Thomas (1895), Bench and bar of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Volume 2, Boston, MA: The Boson History Company, p. 336.  
  3. ^ Davis, William Thomas (1895), Bench and bar of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Volume 2, Boston, MA: The Boson History Company, pp. 237–238.  
  4. ^ Hurd, Duane Hamilton (1883), History of Bristol County, Massachusetts: with biographical sketches of Many of is Pioneers and Prominent Men, Part 2, Philadelphia, PA: J.W.Lewis & Co., p. 627.  
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Josiah Dean
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 7th congressional district

March 4, 1809 – March 3, 1815
Succeeded by
John Reed, Jr.
Political offices
Preceded by
'
Member of the
Massachusetts House of Representatives

1825-1825
Succeeded by
'
Preceded by
'
Member of the
Massachusetts House of Representatives

1803-1808
Succeeded by
'
Legal offices
Preceded by
'
Judge of the Bristol County Court Succeeded by
'
Preceded by
'
Chief Justice of the Court of Common Pleas of Bristol County
May 18, 1810 – May 25, 1819
Succeeded by
'
Preceded by
Josiah Dean
Chief Justice of the Court of Sessions for Bristol County
May 25, 1819 – 1820
Succeeded by
Office Abolished

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.

Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message