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Labial consonant: Wikis

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Places of
articulation

 • Labial
Bilabial
Labial-velar
Labial-alveolar
Labiodental

 • Bidental

 • Coronal
Linguolabial
Interdental
Dental
Denti-alveolar
Alveolar
Apical
Laminal
Postalveolar
Alveolo-palatal
Retroflex

 • Dorsal
Palatal
Labial-palatal
Velar
Uvular
Uvular-epiglottal

 • Radical
Pharyngeal
Epiglotto-pharyngeal
Epiglottal

 • Glottal

This page contains phonetic information in IPA, which may not display correctly in some browsers. [Help]

Labials are consonants articulated either with both lips (bilabial articulation) or with the lower lip and the upper teeth (labiodental articulation). English [m] is a bilabial nasal sonorant, [b] and [p] are bilabial stops (plosives), [v] and [f] are labiodental fricatives.

Bilabial fricatives and the bilabial approximant do not exist in standard English, but do occur in many languages. For example, the Spanish consonant spelt b or v is pronounced as a voiced bilabial approximant between vowels.

Lip rounding, or labialisation can also accompany other articulations. English /w/ is a labialised velar approximant.

Labial consonants are divided into two subplaces of articulation:

Very few languages, however, make a distinction on purely this basis. (One example is Ewe, with both kinds of fricatives.) For by far the most languages in the world, labial by itself is a sufficient phonemic specification. Whether the sounds will actually be bilabial or labiodental depends on the language, but the most common pattern is that exhibited in English: bilabial stops and nasals, labiodental fricatives. Neither purely labial approximant is as common as the labial-velar approximant /w/.

See also

References

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Simple English

Labials or labial consonants are consonants made with the lips. These sounds are made in two ways. Bilabial sounds use both lips (for example [p] as in pack). Labiodental sounds use the lower lip and teeth (for example [f] in food).


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