The Full Wiki

More info on Lady Literate in Arts

Lady Literate in Arts: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A Lady Literate in Arts or LLA qualification was offered by the University of St Andrews for more than a decade before women were allowed to graduate in the same way as men, and it became popular as a kind of external degree for women who had studied through correspondence, or by attendance at non-university classes.

Until 1892 women were not admitted to Scottish universities and the LLA was the nearest qualification to a degree which was open to women in Scotland, although the University of Edinburgh offered certificates recognising achievement in classes organised by the Edinburgh Association for the University Education of Women, and in Glasgow Queen Margaret College was offering a university-equivalent education and awards. To obtain an LLA candidates had to pass examinations at a university-approved centre, which might be in Scotland, elsewhere in the United Kingdom, or abroad.

Even after 1892, the LLA continued to be popular with women who wanted to study for an arts degree without needing to attend one particular institution for three or four years. Thousands of women received an LLA before it was discontinued in the 1930s.

William Knight (1836-1916), Professor of Moral Philosophy at St Andrews between 1876 and 1903, was a supporter of women's education and the main force behind the university's introduction of the LLA degree.

Helen Bannerman, the children's writer, and suffragette Margaret Nevinson both had LLAs.

References

  • Susan Sellers, Mischievous to the Public Interest: The Lady Literate in Arts Diploma and the Admission of Women to the University of St Andrews in Launch-Site for English Studies (1997) ed. Robert Crawford
  • R.N. Smart, Literate Ladies: a Fifty-Year Experiment in St Andrews University Alumnus Chronicle (1967)

External links

Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message