Lamb: Wikis

  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Lamb or The Lamb may refer to:

Contents

Music

Film, television and theatre

  • Lamb (film), a 1986 drama starring Liam Neeson
  • The Lamb (film), a 1918 short comedy starring Harold Lloyd
  • LaMB, an animated telefilm
  • The Lambs, an American theatrical organization
  • The Lamb, an uncompleted film project by Garth Brooks about the fictional musician Chris Gaines

Literature

  • The Lamb, a poem by William Blake
  • Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal, a novel by Christopher Moore

Religion

  • Lamb (liturgy), in the Orthodox Church, a cube of bread offered at the Divine Liturgy
  • The Lamb, a metaphorical reference to Jesus Christ, used primarily in the Book of Revelation

Other uses

See also


Source material

Up to date as of January 22, 2010
(Redirected to The Lamb article)

From Wikisource

Songs of Innocence by William Blake
The Lamb
The Lamb is a poem by William Blake, published in Songs of Innocence in 1789. Like many of Blake's works, the poem is about religion, specificially about Christianity. "We are called by his name" implies that God is present in each one of us. The lamb in the poem is meant to represent Jesus as a gentle, peaceful man. — Excerpted from The Lamb on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
Blake's plate of The Lamb

Little Lamb, who made thee?
Dost thou know who made thee?
Gave thee life & bid thee feed
By the stream & o’er the mead;
Gave thee clothing of delight,
Softest clothing, wooly, bright;
Gave thee such a tender voice,
Making all the vales rejoice?
Little Lamb, who made thee?
Dost thou know who made thee?

Little Lamb, I’ll tell thee,
Little Lamb, I’ll tell thee:
He is callèd by thy name,
For he calls himself a Lamb.
He is meek, & he is mild;
He became a little child.
I a child, & thou a lamb,
We are callèd by his name.
Little Lamb, God bless thee!
Little Lamb, God bless thee!

PD-icon.svg This work published before January 1, 1923 is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.

1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

LAMB (a word common to Teutonic languages; cf. Ger. Lamm), the young of sheep. The Paschal Lamb or Agnus Dei is used as a symbol of Jesus Christ, the Lamb of God (John i. 29), and "lamb," like "flock," is often used figuratively of the members of a Christian church or community, with an allusion to Jesus' charge to Peter (John xxi. 15). The "lamb and flag" is an heraldic emblem, the dexter fore-leg of the lamb supporting a staff bearing a banner charged with the St George's cross. This was one of the crests of the Knights Templars, used on seals as early as 1241; it was adopted as a badge or crest by the Middle Temple, the Inner Temple using another crest of the Templars, the winged horse or Pegasus. The old Tangier regiment, now the Queen's Royal West Surrey Regiment, bore a Paschal Lamb as its badge. From their colonel, Percy Kirke, they were known as Kirke's Lambs. The exaggerated reputation of the regiment for brutality, both in Tangier and in England after Sedgmoor, lent irony to the nickname.


<< Charles Lamb

Marie Lamballe >>


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010
(Redirected to lamb article)

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Contents

English

A sheep and lambs.

Etymology

From Old English lamb, from Proto-Germanic *lambaz. Cognate with German Lamm, Dutch lam, Swedish lamm.

Pronunciation

Noun

Singular
lamb

Plural
lambs

lamb (plural lambs)

  1. A young sheep, of up to one year of age.
  2. The flesh of a lamb used as food.
  3. (figuratively) A person who is meek, docile and easily led.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

Infinitive
to lamb

Third person singular
lambs

Simple past
lambed

Past participle
lambed

Present participle
lambing

to lamb (third-person singular simple present lambs, present participle lambing, simple past and past participle lambed)

  1. (intransitive) Of a sheep, to give birth.
  2. (transitive or intransitive) To assist (sheep) to give birth.
    The shepherd was up all night, lambing her young ewes.

Anagrams


Faroese

Etymology

From Old Norse lamb, from Proto-Germanic *lambaz.

Noun

lamb n.

  1. lamb (both the animal and meat)
  2. (cards, stýrivolt) seven of the chosen cards (trump seven)

Declension

n8 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative lamb lambið lomb lombini
Accusative lamb lambið lomb lombini
Dative lambi lambinum lombum lombunum
Genitive lambs lambsins lamba lambanna

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse lamb, from Proto-Germanic *lambaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA: /lamp/
    Rhymes: -amp

Noun

lamb n. (genitive singular lambs, plural lömb)

  1. lamb

Declension

Derived terms


Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *lambaz.

Noun

lamb n.

  1. lamb

Declension

Singular Plural
nominative lamb lambru
accusative lamb lambru
genitive lambes lambra
dative lambe lambrum

Descendants


Old Norse

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *lambaz.

Noun

lamb n.

  1. lamb

Descendants

  • Norwegian: lam
  • Swedish: lamm; (older and dialectal) lamb (Old Swedish lamb)

Wikispecies

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From Wikispecies

This taxon author may refer to:

James P. Lamb, an American palaeontologist

Ivan Mackenzie Lamb, a botanist, lichenologist


Bible wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From BibleWiki

  1. Heb. kebes, a male lamb from the first to the third year. Offered daily at the morning and the evening sacrifice (Ex 29:38-42), on the Sabbath day (Num 28:9), at the feast of the New Moon (28:11), of Trumpets (29:2), of Tabernacles (13-40), of Pentecost (Lev 23:18-20), and of the Passover (Ex 12:5), and on many other occasions (1Chr 29:21; 2Chr 29:21; Lev 9:3; 14:10-25).
  2. Heb. taleh, a young sucking lamb (1Sam 7:9; Isa 65:25). In the symbolical language of Scripture the lamb is the type of meekness and innocence (Isa 11:6; 65:25; Lk 10:3; Jn 21:15).

The lamb was a symbol of Christ (Gen 4:4; Ex 12:3; 29:38; Isa 16:1; 53:7; Jn 1:36; Rev 13:8).

Christ is called the Lamb of God (Jn 1:29, 36), as the great sacrifice of which the former sacrifices were only types (Num 6:12; Lev 14:12-17; Isa 53:7; 1Cor 5:7).

This entry includes text from Easton's Bible Dictionary, 1897.

what mentions this? (please help by turning references to this page into wiki links)








Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message