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Landslide victory: Wikis

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In politics, a landslide victory (or landslide) is the victory of a candidate or political party by an overwhelming margin in an election.

Contents

Australia

After the 2007 federal election some commentators referred to the Labor Party's win under Kevin Rudd as a ruddslide. By historical standards though, the victory was not unusually large. Some notable election results in Australia have been:

  • 1917 - Nationalist Party won 53 of the 75 seats in the House of Representatives (the Nationalists also attained the highest primary vote (54%) to date in a federal election)
  • 1925 - Nationalist-Country Coalition won 51 of the 75 seats in the House of Representatives
  • 1929 - Australian Labor Party won 46 of the 75 seats in the House of Representatives
  • 1943 - Australian Labor Party won 49 of the 74 seats in the House of Representatives
  • 1949 - Liberal-Country Coalition won 74 of the 121 seats in the House of Representatives
  • 1958 - Liberal-Country Coalition won 77 of the 121 seats in the House of Representatives
  • 1966 - Liberal-Country Coalition won 82 of the 124 seats in the House of Representatives
  • 1975 - Liberal-National Coalition won 91 of the 127 seats in the House of Representatives
  • 1983 - Australian Labor Party won 75 of the 125 seats in the House of Representatives
  • 1996 - Liberal-National Coalition won 94 of the 148 seats in the House of Representatives
  • The 1931 election stands as the greatest loss of seats for a government - 32 seats in a 74-seat parliament

Australian elections are characterised by few changes in government — since 1949 there have been only five elections where a new party has won government. When a new party is elected, however, it is generally by a landslide.

Some notable state election landslides include:

  • 1911 Western Australian state election - The Labor party, previously in opposition, won 34 of the 50 seats in the state Legislative Assembly.
  • 1933 Western Australian state election - The Labor party, previously in opposition, won 30 of the 50 seats in the state Legislative Assembly, reducing the previous party of government, the Nationalists, to minor party status.
  • 1974 Queensland state election - Country-Liberal Coalition won 69 of the 82 seats in the state parliament (the Coalition's win, while overwhelming, was exaggerated by the Bjelkemander in operation in the state's electoral divisions at the time)
  • 1981 New South Wales state election - Australian Labor Party won 69 of the 99 seats in the state Legislative Assembly.
  • 1993 South Australian state election - Liberal Party, previously in opposition, won 37 of the 47 seats in the state House of Assembly.
  • 2001 Queensland state election - Australian Labor Party won 66 of the 89 seats in the state Legislative Assembly.
  • 2002 Victorian state election - Australian Labor Party won 62 of the 88 seats in the state Legislative Assembly.

Canada

France

Germany

Hong Kong

Poland

Russia

South Korea

  • In the 2007 Presidential election, Lee Myung-bak beat his nearest rival Chung Dong-young by 22.6 percentage points, garnering 48.7% of the vote against Chung's 26.1% of the vote, while independent candidate Lee Hoi-chang came in third with 15.1% of the vote. Since the beginning of direct Presidential elections in South Korea, this election was won by the widest margin in South Korea history. However, the turnout was the lowest ever for a South Korean presidential election.

United Kingdom

In general, any British general election which results in a majority of over 100 seats tends to be described as a landslide. Landslide victories since the Reform Act 1884 (the first time a majority of adult males could vote) are:

Labour's general election victory in 2001 with an overall majority of 167 was dubbed "the quiet landslide" by the media. Though the Government did score a very high majority, public interest in the election was not excited and, unlike most of the landslide results listed above, there was little change from the previous election and no change of governing party.

Landslides are relatively common in British electoral history, and this is partly as a result of the first-past-the-post electoral system. Relatively small differences in numbers of popular votes cast be amplified by the eventual result. For instance, Labour achieved a 66-seat majority in the 2005 election despite securing only 35% of the vote. Conversely, parties can poll very highly and achieve disproportionately low numbers of MPs.

United States

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Presidential

Presidential elections in the United States are indirect; they are not determined by the "popular vote", but by the Electoral College. Each state is allocated as many "electors" as it has Senators and Representatives in the United States Congress, and, at present, all states but Nebraska and Maine hold a "winner take all" vote, in which the winner of the popular vote in a state wins all electoral votes the state is eligible to cast.

For this reason, many presidential victories appear to be huge landslide victories when examining the electoral vote, but much less so when examining the popular vote; for example, in the 1980 election, Ronald Reagan won 89.7% of the electoral vote but 50.7% of the popular vote to Jimmy Carter's 41.0%.

Popular votes

Electoral votes

The greatest modern landslides in the United States Presidential elections

  • 1920 - the greatest percentage point margin in the popular vote (Harding 60.3% to Cox 34.1%).
  • 1936 - the greatest electoral votes difference between winner and opponent (Roosevelt 523 to Landon 8).
  • 1964 - the highest percentage for winner (Lyndon Johnson 61.1%).
  • 1984 - the highest number of electoral votes (Reagan 525).

Notes


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