Laois–Offaly (Dáil Éireann constituency): Wikis

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Laois–Offaly
Dáil Éireann Parliamentary Constituency
Laois-Offaly (Dáil Éireann constituency).png
Laois–Offaly shown within Ireland
Created 1921 (1921)
TDs 5
Counties County Laois, County Offaly
EP constituency East

Laois–Offaly (formerly Leix–Offaly and Laoighis–Offaly) is a parliamentary constituency represented in Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Irish parliament or Oireachtas. The constituency elects five Teachtaí Dála (TDs). The method of election is the single transferable vote form of proportional representation (PR-STV).

It spans the entire area of County Laois (known before independence as Queen's County) and County Offaly (previously known as King's County). It includes the towns of Tullamore, Birr, Portarlington and Portlaoise.

Currently the most high-profile TD for the constituency is the Taoiseach, Brian Cowen.

Contents

History

Laois–Offaly is the oldest two-county constituency in Ireland, having been created under the Government of Ireland Act 1920, and used for the subsequent 1921 general election to the Second Dáil. It has been used at every subsequent general election.

The name of the constituency has been changed twice, to reflect different spellings of the name of County Laois:

  • At its creation in 1921, it was known as Leix–Offaly
  • In 1961, it was renamed Laoighis–Offaly
  • For the 2007 general election, it was renamed Laois–Offaly, which its current formal name.
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Chronology

1918–1921 
For the First Dáil (1919–1921), the Sinn Féin MPs elected in 1918 for the two single-member UK Parliament constituencies of King's County and Queen's County boycotted the British House of Commons and joined the revolutionary assembly in Dublin. In the Dáil the Queen's County constituency was known as Leix (as mentioned in the list of Deputies present read out in English on the second day of the session, and implied by the use of Co. Laoise in the Irish list used on the first day). King's County also seems to have been known by a different name. The Irish form used was Co. Uí Fáilghe, which seems close to the modern Irish language name for Offaly.
1921–1923 
The two counties were combined in a single four-member constituency for the House of Commons of Southern Ireland. The Sinn Féin candidates elected unopposed preferred to sit in the Second Dáil (1921–1922). In the Dáil the Irish form of the constituency name was Co. Laoighise agus Co. O bhFáilghe. Leix and Offaly seem to be the versions used in English. The four-seat constituency was also used for the Third Dáil (1922–1923). In the Irish Free State the official name in English of the constituency was undoubtedly Leix–Offaly (see the list of constituencies mentioned in the motion passed by the Second Dáil on 20 May 1922 and the Electoral Act 1923 (No. 12/1923)).
1923–1961 
The constituency was granted a fifth seat.
1961–2007 
In the Electoral (Amendment) Act 1961 (No. 19/1961) the constituency was renamed Laoighis–Offaly, but was otherwise unchanged.
2007– 
Under the Electoral (Amendment) Act 2005 (No. 16/205) the official name of the constituency is Laois–Offaly, but is otherwise unchanged.

Boundaries

Summary of seats won

Party 1937 1938 1943 1944 1948 1951 1954 1957 1961 1965 1969 1973 1977 1981 1982F 1982N 1987 1989 1992 1997 2002 2007
Fianna Fáil 2 3 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
Fine Gael 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 1 2 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 2 1 2
Labour 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Independent 1 1 1 1
Progressive Democrats 1

TDs

Teachtaí Dála (TDs) for Laois–Offaly 1921–[1]
Dáil Election Deputy
(Party)
Deputy
(Party)
Deputy
(Party)
Deputy
(Party)
Deputy
(Party)
2nd 1921 Francis Bulfin
(SF)
Joseph Lynch
(SF)
Patrick McCartan
(SF)
Kevin O'Higgins
(SF)
4 seats
1921–1923
3rd 1922 Francis Bulfin
(Pro-Treaty)
William Davin
(Lab)
Patrick McCartan
(Pro-Treaty)
Kevin O'Higgins
(Pro-Treaty)
4th 1923 Francis Bulfin
(CnaG)
Patrick Egan
(CnaG)
Seán McGuinness
(SF)
Laurence Brady
(SF)
1926 by-election James Dwyer
(CnaG)
5th 1927 (Jun) John Gill
(Lab)
Thomas Tynan
(FF)
Patrick Boland
(FF)
6th 1927 (Sep) William Aird
(CnaG)
Patrick Gorry
(FF)
7th 1932 Thomas F. O'Higgins
(CnaG)
Eugene O'Brien
(CnaG)
8th 1933 Eamon Donnelly
(FF)
Jack Finlay
(NCP)
9th 1937 Thomas F. O'Higgins
(FG)
Patrick Gorry
(FF)
Jack Finlay
(FG)
10th 1938 Daniel Hogan
(FF)
11th 1943 Oliver J. Flanagan
(Ind)
12th 1944
13th 1948 Tom O'Higgins, Jnr
(FG)
14th 1951 Peadar Maher
(FF)
15th 1954 Oliver J. Flanagan
(FG)
Nicholas Egan
(FF)
1956 by-election Kieran Egan
(FF)
16th 1957
17th 1961 Patrick Lalor
(FF)
18th 1965 Henry Byrne
(Lab)
19th 1969 Tom Enright
(FG)
Bernard Cowen
(FF)
Ger Connolly
(FF)
20th 1973 Charles McDonald
(FG)
21st 1977 Bernard Cowen
(FF)
22nd 1981 Liam Hyland
(FF)
23rd 1982 (Feb)
24th 1982 (Nov)
1984 by-election Brian Cowen
(FF)
25th 1987 Charles Flanagan
(FG)
26th 1989
27th 1992[2] Pat Gallagher
(Lab)
28th 1997[3] Tom Enright
(FG)
John Moloney
(FF)
Seán Fleming
(FF)
29th 2002[4] Olwyn Enright
(FG)
Tom Parlon
(PD)
30th 2007[5][6] Charles Flanagan
(FG)

Note: The columns in this table are used only for presentational purposes, and no significance should be attached to the order of columns. For details of the order in which seats were won at each election, see the detailed results of that election.

Elections

2007 general election

2007 General Election: Laois–Offaly[5][6]
Party Candidate 1st Pref  % Seat Count
Fianna Fáil Brian Cowen 19,102 26.7 1 1
Fine Gael Olwyn Enright 8,297 11.6 2 8
Fine Gael Charles Flanagan 9,067 12.7 3 9
Fianna Fáil Seán Fleming 8,064 11.3 4 9
Fianna Fáil John Moloney 7,242 10.1 5 11
Fianna Fáil John Foley 5,899 8.3
Progressive Democrats Tom Parlon 4,233 5.9
Sinn Féin Brian Stanley 3,656 5.1
Fine Gael Molly Buckley 2,196 3.1
Labour Party Jim O'Brien 1,278 1.8
Independent John Bracken 934 1.3
Green Party Máire McKay 812 1.1
Labour Party David Whelan 425 0.6
Christian Solidarity Colm Callanan 156 0.2
Independent Joseph McCormack 85 0.1
Independent Noel O'Gara 45 0.1
Electorate: 103,673   Valid: 71,491   Spoilt: 662   Quota: 11,916   Turnout: 69.6%

2002 general election

2002 General Election: Laois–Offaly[4]
Party Candidate 1st Pref  % Seat Count
Fianna Fáil Brian Cowen 12,529 19.80 1 1
Progressive Democrats Tom Parlon 9,088 14.36 2 5
Fine Gael Olwyn Enright 8,053 12.72 3 6
Fianna Fáil John Moloney 8,093 12.79 4 6
Fianna Fáil Seán Fleming 7,091 11.20 5 6
Fine Gael Charles Flanagan 6,500 10.27
Fianna Fáil Ger Killally 4,719 7.46
Sinn Féin Brian Stanley 2,600 4.11
Independent Molly Buckley 1,695 2.68
Labour Party John Dwyer 1,675 2.65
Green Party Christopher Fettes 520 0.82
Independent Joe McCormack 351 0.55
Independent John Kelly 236 0.37
Christian Solidarity Michael Redmond 142 0.22
Electorate: 95,373   Valid: 63,217   Spoilt: 671   Quota: 10,537   Turnout: 66.99%

See also

References

  1. ^ Walker, Brian M, ed (1992). Parliamentary election results in Ireland, 1918-92. Dublin: Royal Irish Academy. ISBN 0 901714 96 8.  
  2. ^ "General election 1992: Laois–Offaly". ElectionsIreland.org. http://www.electionsireland.org/result.cfm?election=1992&cons=150. Retrieved 2009-02-27.  
  3. ^ "General election 1997: Laois–Offaly". ElectionsIreland.org. http://www.electionsireland.org/result.cfm?election=1997&cons=150. Retrieved 2009-02-27.  
  4. ^ a b "General election 2002: Laois–Offaly". ElectionsIreland.org. http://www.electionsireland.org/result.cfm?election=2002&cons=150. Retrieved 2009-02-27.  
  5. ^ a b "General election 2007: Laois–Offaly". RTÉ News. http://www.rte.ie/news/elections2007/Laois-Offaly.html. Retrieved 2009-02-27.  
  6. ^ a b "General election 2007: Laois–Offaly". ElectionsIreland.org. http://www.electionsireland.org/result.cfm?election=2007&cons=150. Retrieved 2009-02-27.  

External links


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