Larry Robinson: Wikis

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Robinson as part of the 2008 Legends Classic game.
Born June 2, 1951 (1951-06-02) (age 58),
Winchester, ON, CA
Height
Weight
6 ft 5 in (1.96 m)
225 lb (102 kg; 16 st 1 lb)
Position Defence
Shot Left
Pro clubs Montreal Canadiens
Los Angeles Kings
Ntl. team  Canada
NHL Draft 20th overall, 1971
Montreal Canadiens
Career 1971 – 1992
Hall of Fame, 1995

Larry Clark Robinson (born June 2, 1951 in Marvelville, Ontario, Canada) is a former ice hockey player and coach in the National Hockey League. Robinson was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1995 and is currently a special assignment coach for the New Jersey Devils.

Contents

Playing career

Larry Robinson played Junior 'A' hockey with the Brockville Braves of the CJHL and Juniors with the Kitchener Rangers then turned professional, spending 1971 to 1973 with the Nova Scotia Voyageurs of the American Hockey League before making it to the National Hockey League with the Montreal Canadiens.

Nicknamed "Big Bird" for his blond hair and size (6'5" and 225 pounds), Robinson was a big and strong defenceman yet highly mobile. He played 17 seasons for the Montreal Canadiens and another three seasons for the Los Angeles Kings, until his retirement after the 1992 season. He won the James Norris Memorial Trophy twice as the league's most outstanding defenceman and won the Conn Smythe Trophy as the most valuable player of the 1978 playoffs. Robinson was a dominant player whose talent and leadership helped lead the Canadiens to six Stanley Cups.

Robinson was a member of Team Canada in the 1976, 1981 and 1984 World Cup of Hockey (then named Canada Cup) tournaments and was an international All-Star team selection in the 1981 IIHF World Championships. During his career, he played in ten of the league's All-Star games and ended his 20-year career having scored 208 goals, 750 assists and 958 regular-season points as well as 144 points in 227 playoff games, a remarkable achievement for a defenceman. He holds an impressive career rating of +730, the NHL career record, including an overwhelming +120 in 1976–77 (second only to Bobby Orr's record plus-124 in 1970–71). He won six Stanley Cups with the Canadiens 1973, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1986, and also has the NHL record for playing 20 consecutive seasons in the playoffs, 17 of them with the Canadiens. [1]

Robinson has been honoured for his playing career. In 1995, he was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame. In 1998, he was ranked number 24 on The Hockey News' list of the 100 Greatest Hockey Players. In 2000, he was inducted into the Ottawa Sports Hall of Fame. On November 19, 2007, the Canadiens retired Robinson's #19 jersey before a loss against the Ottawa Senators.[1] Larry Robinsons' name appears on the Stanley Cup 9 times, as a player/coach/scout.

Coaching

Following his retirement, Robinson was hired as an assistant coach with the New Jersey Devils in 1993. After winning the Stanley Cup in 1995 with the Devils, he was hired as head coach of the Los Angeles Kings, the same year he was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame. He left the Los Angeles team at the end of the 1998-99 season and signed on as an assistant coach with the New Jersey Devils once again. Named interim head coach of the New Jersey Devils on March 23, 2000, Robinson guided his team to the Stanley Cup. He stayed on as head coach for the next year and again guided the Devils to the finals, where they lost to the Colorado Avalanche in seven games. Interestingly, when the Devils won the Stanley Cup in 2000, they defeated a defending champion, Dallas Stars. He said that was his greatest day. He recounted to Scott Morrison:

Considering how long I played hockey and how many Cups I got to win as a defensemen with Montreal, it was my first Stanley Cup win as a head coach that is actually my greatest day in hockey.[2]

Robinson was fired during the 2001-02 season, but returned as an assistant coach just before the 2002-03 season to win his 9th Stanley Cup in 2003.

When Pat Burns suffered a recurrence of cancer, Robinson again assumed the mantle of head coach on July 14, 2005. This stint came to an end on December 19, 2005, when Robinson resigned, citing stress and other health problems.[3]

Robinson returned to the Devils prior to the 2007-08 season as an assistant coach under Brent Sutter. Prior to the 2008-09 season, Robinson left from behind the Devils' bench to become a special assignment coach between the organization's prospects in Lowell, Mass., and the Devils.[4]

Personal

Larry Robinson was raised on an Ontario farm and as a boy he grew up with a love of horses. While living in the rural area of St. Lazare outside of Montreal, Robinson became a co-founder with former teammate Steve Shutt and local veterinarian Dr. Gilbert Hallé of the Montreal Polo Club at Sainte-Marthe, Quebec.

Career statistics

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1970–71 Kitchener Rangers OHA 61 12 39 51 65
1971–72 Nova Scotia Voyageurs AHL 74 10 14 24 54 15 2 10 12 31
1972–73 Nova Scotia Voyageurs AHL 38 6 33 39 33
1972–73 Montreal Canadiens NHL 36 2 4 6 20 11 1 4 5 9
1973–74 Montreal Canadiens NHL 78 6 20 26 66 6 0 1 1 26
1974–75 Montreal Canadiens NHL 80 14 47 61 76 11 0 4 4 27
1975–76 Montreal Canadiens NHL 80 10 30 40 59 13 3 3 6 10
1976–77 Montreal Canadiens NHL 77 19 66 85 45 14 2 10 12 12
1977–78 Montreal Canadiens NHL 80 13 52 65 39 15 4 17 21 6
1978–79 Montreal Canadiens NHL 67 16 45 61 33 16 6 9 15 8
1979–80 Montreal Canadiens NHL 72 14 61 75 39 10 0 4 4 2
1980–81 Montreal Canadiens NHL 65 12 38 50 37 3 0 1 1 2
1981–82 Montreal Canadiens NHL 71 12 47 59 41 5 0 1 1 8
1982–83 Montreal Canadiens NHL 71 14 49 63 33 3 0 0 0 2
1983–84 Montreal Canadiens NHL 74 9 34 43 39 15 0 5 5 22
1984–85 Montreal Canadiens NHL 76 13 34 47 44 12 3 8 11 8
1985–86 Montreal Canadiens NHL 78 19 62 82 39 20 9 13 22 22
1986–87 Montreal Canadiens NHL 70 13 37 50 44 17 3 17 20 6
1987–88 Montreal Canadiens NHL 53 6 34 40 30 11 1 4 5 4
1988–89 Montreal Canadiens NHL 74 4 26 30 22 21 2 8 10 12
1989–90 Los Angeles Kings NHL 64 7 32 39 34 10 2 3 5 10
1990–91 Los Angeles Kings NHL 62 1 22 23 16 12 1 4 5 15
1991–92 Los Angeles Kings NHL 56 3 10 13 37 2 0 0 0 0
NHL totals 1384 208 750 958 793 227 28 116 144 211
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Coaching career statistics

Team Year Regular season Post season
G W L T OTL Pts Finish W L Win % Result
LA 1995–96 82 24 40 18 - 66 6th in Pacific - - - -
LA 1996–97 82 28 43 11 - 67 6th in Pacific - - - -
LA 1997–98 82 38 33 11 - 87 2nd in Pacific 0 4 .000 Conference Quarter-Finalist
LA 1998–99 82 32 45 5 - 69 2nd in Pacific - - - -
LA total 328 122 161 45 - .441 - 0 4 .000 1 playoff appearance
NJ 1999–00 8 4 4 0 0 (103) 2nd in Atlantic 16 7 .696 Won Stanley Cup
NJ 2000–01 82 48 19 12 3 111 1st in Atlantic 15 10 .600 Runner up
NJ 2001–02 51 21 20 7 3 (95) - - - - (fired)
NJ total 141 73 43 19 6 .606 - 31 17 .646 2 playoff appearances
1 Stanley Cup
NJ 2005–06 32 14 13 0 5 (101) - - - - (resigned)
NJ total 32 14 13 - 5 .516 - - - - -
Combined NJ total 173 87 56 19 11 .590 - 31 17 .646 2 playoff appearances
1 Stanley Cup
Total 501 209 217 64 11 .492 - 31 21 .596 3 playoff appearances
1 Stanley Cup

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Larry Robinson joins Canadiens legends with retirement of his No. 19 jersey". The Canadian Press. 2001-2007. http://canadianpress.google.com/article/ALeqM5gPjzNM7h8VL65E7g9JDC8k6hg0Xw. Retrieved 2007-11-22.  
  2. ^ Morrison, Scott (2008). Hockey Night in Canada: My Greatest Day. Toronto: Key Porter Books. p. 178. ISBN 978-1-55470-086-8.  
  3. ^ CBC Sports (2005-12-21). "Larry Robinson resigns as Devils coach". http://www.cbc.ca/sports/story/2005/12/19/larry-robinson051220.html. Retrieved 2007-11-21.  
  4. ^ Rich Chere/The Star-Ledger (2008-07-22). "Robinson won't be behind N.J. Devils' bench this season". http://www.nj.com/devils/index.ssf/2008/07/robinson_wont_be_behind_bench.html. Retrieved 2009-02-19.  

External links

Preceded by
Guy Lafleur
Winner of the Conn Smythe Trophy
1978
Succeeded by
Bob Gainey
Preceded by
Denis Potvin
Winner of the Norris Trophy
1980
Succeeded by
Randy Carlyle
Preceded by
Denis Potvin
Winner of the Norris Trophy
1977
Succeeded by
Denis Potvin
Preceded by
Rogatien Vachon
Head coaches of the Los Angeles Kings
19951999
Succeeded by
Andy Murray
Preceded by
Robbie Ftorek
Head coaches of the New Jersey Devils
20002002
Succeeded by
Kevin Constantine
Preceded by
Pat Burns
Head coaches of the New Jersey Devils
2005
Succeeded by
Lou Lamoriello

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